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DOG FIRST AID
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DOG FIRST AID MEDICINE VETERINARY
DOG and PUPPY FIRST MEDICAL HELP:
Medicine and Aid for wounded dogs
Dog Emergency First Aid Kit
Homehols Dog-Friendly Medicine List
Dog-Friendly Human Medicine
Blind Dog Care
Dog Poisons
Dog Parasites
Dog Veterinary: Paw Cut, Injures
Dog Teeth Trauma

Warning!!!
Always approach an injured animal with care. When in pain or shocked, even the most gentle of family pets can be unpredictable. Crouch or kneel to put yourself on the same level as the dog and approach him slowly and calmly. Do not make direct eye contact and talk to the dog in a calm, soothing voice.



DOG FIRST AID MEDICINE VETERINARY


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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
DOG EMERGENCY CASE
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

What is the reason for Dog First Aid?
saving life
reducing pain
relieving suffering
promoting recovery

dog and puppy infograms, infographics - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!!!

When should dog first aid be used?
Immediately following an accident or sudden illness. First aid should be restricted to what is necessary to save an animal's life, to reduce pain and therefore to stop suffering until the animal receives attention by a veterinary surgeon.

DOG-FRIENDLY HOME MEDICINE LIST

It is usually much better to take the dog to the vet, rather than calling the vet to your home as they will be better equipped at the surgery to carry out the correct treatment required.

PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE! - dog and puppy infograms, infographics

Never rush straight to your veterinary surgery without telephoning first
It may be that emergencies are seen at a different site/branch, or that the vet could give you vital advice before you travel with your dog. It may also possible that there is no vet at the surgery at that specific time.

Never give a sick or injured dog anything to eat or drink unless the vet tells you to do so

All Vets are required to provide an emergency 24 hour service, 365 days a year and your pet will always benefit from seeing a familiar vet. Always try your own vets first.


DOG FIRST AID, DOG MEDICINE, DOG VETERINARY

IN EMERGENCY SITUATIONS:
DO NOT PANIC! It does not help to save your dog.

Always have a first aid kit ready.

First ensure the safety of yourself and others. Keep calm and assess the situation before acting. Injured animals are frightened and in pain and may try to bite anyone who touches them.

Act cautiously. If your pet has been injured, remember that frightened or hurt dogs can bite the people they know and love. Small dogs that do not have fractured bones, can be wrapped snugly in an old towel.

Slow down external bleeding with manual compression or a compression bandage around the limbs. Tourniquets are generally not advisable because they can inadvertently cut the circulation from the limb.

Do not move your dog unnecessarily. Lift injured dogs with a board or blanket if they cannot walk.

Keep your dog warm, particularly if unconscious, wet or in shock from haemorrhaging or other trauma.

Contact the vet. Keep your vet's phone number to hand and know the name of the practice.

Always phone first, whatever the situation, as there may not always be a vet available but staff may be able to suggest immediate action you can take

Have a pen handy in case another number is given. Treatment can usually be provided more quickly if the dog is taken to the surgery, rather than if the vet is called out.

If there is a risk of biting, put a muzzle on the dog, or wrap tape around the nose and tie behind the ears, unless the dog has difficulty breathing. Small dogs may be restrained by putting a thick towel over their heads.

Never give human medicines to a dog, many will do more harm than good. Do not offer food or drink in case anaesthetic is needed.
Drive carefully when taking the patient to the surgery

If you do get bitten, see your doctor


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
You should phone the vet if:
your pet seems weak, is reluctant to get up, or is dull and depressed

there is difficulty breathing, or it is noisy or rapid, or if there is continual coughing causing distress

there is repeated vomiting, particularly with young or elderly animals. Diarrhoea is less serious, unless severe, bloody or the animal seems weak or unwell. Feed small amounts of a bland diet (boiled chicken or white fish) and see a vet if it persists for over a day.

your dog appears to be in severe pain or discomfort

your pet is trying to urinate or defecate and is unable to. Blockage of the bladder sometimes occurs, especially in males, and can kill if not treated urgently.

there are sudden difficulties with balance

a bitch with suckling puppies is agitated, shaking and shivering and will not settle. It could be eclampsia, which needs urgent treatment.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
DOG FIRST AID
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When your pet has an emergency, being prepared is very important. Before an emergency strikes, be sure you know how your veterinarian handles emergencies or where you should go if you have one. For example, some veterinarians always have someone on call, while others use special emergency hospitals for things that arise after hours. AAHA-accredited hospitals are required to provide 24-hour-a-day emergency care in one way or another. You can also stay prepared for emergencies by putting together a pet first-aid kit.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

MUZZLE YOUR DOG

We cannot stress enough that you SHOULD NOT get on-line during a pet emergency or when your pet is seriously ill. In an emergency, first aid is not a substitute for veterinary treatment. However, before you are able to get your pet to a veterinarian, knowing some basic first aid can help. Always seek veterinary care following first-aid attempts.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Please remember that your pet's likelihood of surviving with resuscitation is very low. However, in an emergency it may give your pet its only chance. Always remember that any first aid administered to your pet should be followed by immediate veterinary care. First aid care is not a substitute for veterinary care, but it may save your pet's life until it receives veterinary treatment.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Dog first aid - Basic procedures
Emergency treatment and first aid for pets should never be used as a substitute for veterinary care. But it may save your pet's life before you can get your pet to a veterinarian.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid: DOG POISONS

Poisoning & Exposure to Toxins

Pet poison hazards
Poisoning is a pet emergency that causes a great deal of confusion for pet owners. In general, any products that are harmful for people are also harmful for pets. Examples include cleaning products, rodent poisons and antifreeze. But you also need to be aware of common food items that may be harmful to your pet. The AVMA brochure Household Hazards offers a summary of what foods and common household items may pose a danger to your pet. Additional information and examples can be found on the other Web sites listed in this section.

dog and puppy infograms, infographics

If your pet's skin or eyes are exposed to a toxic product (such as many cleaning products), check the product label for the instructions for people exposed to the product; if the label instructs you to wash your hands with soap and water if you're exposed, then wash your pet's skin with soap and water (don't get any into its eyes, mouth or nose). If the label tells you to flush the skin or eyes with water, do this for your pet as soon as ossible (if you can do it safely), and call a veterinarian immediately.

Symptoms include vomiting, convulsions, diarrhea, salivation, weakness, depression, pain. Record what the pet ingested and how much. Immediately call your veterinarian or poison control center. Do not induce vomiting. In case of toxins or chemicals on the skin from oils, paints, insecticides and other contact irritants, request directions on if and how to wash the toxin off. If you know your pet has consumed something that may be harmful, or if the animal is having seizures, losing consciousness, is unconscious or is having difficulty breathing, telephone your veterinarian, emergency veterinary clinic or the Animal Poison Control Center hotline (888.426.4435 - available 365 days/year, 24 hours/day) immediately. There is a fee for the consultation.

If possible, have the following information available:
Species, breed, age, sex, weight & number of animals involved
Symptoms
Name/description of the substance that is in question; the amount the animal was exposed to; and the length of time of the exposure (how long it's been since your pet ate it or was exposed to it).
Have the product container/packaging available for reference.

Collect any material your pet may have vomited or chewed, and place it in a plastic sealable bag to take with you when you bring your animal in for veterinary treatment.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Additional Information on Animal Poisoning:

Animal Poison Control FAQs

Another resource is Killer Grapes and Other Concerns in Animal Poison Control, available on the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine's Web site.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Seizures / Convulsions
Symptoms include salivation, loss of control of urine or stool, violent muscle twitching, loss of consciousness. Move the pet away from any objects that could be harmful during the seizure. Use a blanket for padding and protection. Do not put yourself at risk by restraining the pet during the seizure. Time the seizure. They usually last only 2 to 3 minutes. Afterwards, keep the animal calm and quiet.

Keep your pet away from any objects, including furniture, that might hurt it. Do not try to restrain the pet.
Time the seizure - they usually last 2-3 minutes.
After the seizure has stopped, keep your pet as warm and quiet as possible and contact your veterinarian.

READ AN ARTICLE ABOUT HOW
TO GIVE A FIRST AID TO A SEIZURED DOG
at WWW.ANIMALS.HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM



Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Eye injuries
Injuries to the eye are always very painful and can threaten the eyesight. If a foreign body (grass awn, stick, etc.) can be seen, it may be possible to remove it by gently rinsing the eye with eyewash or contact lens saline solution. Do not allow the dog to rub the eye, either with its paws or against the furniture or carpet. Seek veterinary advice as soon as possible.

READ AN ARTICLE ABOUT HOW
TO GIVE A FIRST AID TO EYE-INJURED DOG
at WWW.ANIMALS.HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM



Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Ears
Bleeding: this is often the result of cuts, bites, scratches etc. They often look worse than they are, especially as the dog will shake its head and spread the blood around. Try and stop the bleeding (see above) and put a bandage on if possible. (photo 16) Prevent rubbing of the ear. A good way to prevent the ear flap being flapped around is by putting a cut up pair of tights on the dog's head. Aural haematomas are swellings of the ear flap, these are not an emergency. Foreign bodies are often seen in the ear, mostly grass seeds (awns) in the summer months. These are intensely painful and need to be removed, often under general anaesthetic, by your vet.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Epilepsy / Fitting
If a dog has an epileptic fit or similar, the best thing to do is to put the dog in a quiet and darkened room and prevent it from harming itself. Clear the mouth if necessary, but beware of biting! If the dog stays in a fit for more than five minutes (this is a very long time!) ring the vet. Most dogs will come out of a fit within a few minutes. Stay calm!


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Frostbite
When a dog is exposed to freezing temperatures for a long period of time, there is always the possibility of frostbite. The signs of frostbite include pain, pale skin in early stages, and red or black skin in advanced stages.

dog and puppy infograms, infographics - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!

The areas most likely to be frostbitten are those that have little or no hair and the ears and tail tip, which have a limited blood supply. Occasionally, if damage from frostbite is severe, part of the tail or ear tips may actually fall off. Professional attention should be sought before this happens. To provide proper care to a dog suffering from frostbite, use the following tips.
Step 1: Restrain the dog if necessary.
Step 1a: Approach the dog slowly, speaking in a reassuring tone of voice.
Step 1b: Slip a leash around the dog's neck, then place the leash around a fixed object. Pull the dog against this object and tie the leash so the dog cannot move its head.
Step 1c: Muzzle the dog to protect yourself, if necessary.
Step 2: Warm the area with moist towels. The water temperature should be warm but not hot (75 degrees Fahrenheit/24 degrees Celsius). DO NOT use ointment.
Step 3: If the skin turns dark, transport the dog to the veterinarian as soon as possible.Just as exposure to extreme cold can be harmful to your pet!


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Teeth
Fractures of teeth are not uncommon. If they are fresh, see the vet the same day if possible! If they happened some time ago, it is no longer an emergency. Loose teeth are normally the result of chronic periodontal disease and therefore not an emergency. Foreign bodies can be lodged in between the top molar teeth on the roof of the mouth, e.g. a stick or bone. If they can not be removed by gentle traction the vet may have to sedate the dog for successful removal.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Tongue / Lips
Foreign bodies will lead to salivation and extensive licking and sometimes bleeding and gagging. Try to remove the foreign body gently, but only if this can be done safely! Fish hooks should be left in place for the vet to remove. Ulcers are sometimes seen in the mouth as a result of the ingestion or licking of corrosive materials. Wounds are often the result of "stick injuries" where the dog has launched itself onto a stick, thrown by the owner. They can bleed heavily but often stop bleeding quite soon. These stick injuries can cause extremely serious complications and should be avoided at all cost!


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Anxiety
Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid - INFOGRAm, INFOGRAPHICS - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid - INFOGRAm, INFOGRAPHICS - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!


Diabetes
If your dog has been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and has a hypoglycaemic crisis (but is not unconscious), continually place sugar water or honey on the tongue until you can get to a vet and measure the blood glucose level.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Foot Injuries
The majority of foot injuries occur to the foot pad, which cannot be sutured. Apply pressure to the wound until all bleeding stops. Bandaging the foot is advisable, however, most dogs will chew the bandage off of the foot. Another method of protecting the injury is to apply Super Glue to the outer edges of the injury and hold the wound closed until the glue dries. Caution must be taken to avoid gluing yourself to the dog. Once the glue has dried, the dog may move about freely, allowing the wound to be protected. As the wound heals, the glue will wear off through normal walking.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Fractures
Muzzle your pet.
Gently lay your pet on a flat surface for support.
While transporting your injured pet to a veterinarian, use a stretcher - you can use a board or other firm surface as a stretcher, or use a throw rug or blanket as a sling. If possible, secure the pet to the stretcher (make sure you don't put pressure on the injured area or the animal's chest) for transport-this may be as simple as wrapping a blanket around them.
You can attempt to set the fracture with a homemade splint, but remember that a badly-placed splint may cause more harm than good. If in doubt, it is always best to leave the bandaging and splinting to a veterinarian.

Symptoms include pain, inability to use a limb, or limb at odd angle. Muzzle the pet and look for bleeding. If you can control bleeding without causing more injury, then do so. Watch for signs of shock. DO NOT TRY TO SET THE FRACTURE by pulling or tugging on the limb. Transport the pet to the veterinarian immediately, supporting the injured part as best you can.


DOG MEDICINE & VETERENARY
Birthgiving
A dog's normal length of pregnancy (gestation period) is 61 to 63 days. However, delivery 1 or 2 days earlier or later is not unusual and presents no cause for alarm as long as the general health of the dog is good.

A puppy may be born in one of three ways. The most common presentation is head and feet first. The second most common is rear legs and tail first, not to be confused with a true breech birth. In a true breech only the rump is presented, with the rear legs folded under the body of the puppy. In a small bitch, this type of presentation can cause problems and should be watched for carefully.

READ AN ARTICLE ABOUT HOW
TO GIVE A FIRST AID TO A BIRTHGIVING DOG
at WWW.ANIMALS.HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM



Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Fractured or pulled-off claws
These are often very painful and tend to become infected very quickly. Bleeding can often be profuse initially. Dogs will often lick at them constantly, which adds to the damage. If possible try to apply a bandage or at least cover the foot with a sock to prevent self-trauma. If there is a lot of bleeding apply a tighter bandage as for a cut foot. The foot should be checked by a vet as antibiotics are almost always necessary and sometimes the claw will need to be clipped back under sedation or anaesthetic.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Bleeding
External
Applying bandage to stop external bleeding
Muzzle your pet.
Press a clean, thick gauze pad over the wound, and keep pressure over the wound with your hand until the blood starts clotting. This will often take several minutes for the clot to be strong enough to stop the bleeding. Instead of checking it every few seconds to see if it has clotted, hold pressure on it for a minimum of 3 minutes and then check it.

Apply firm, direct pressure over the bleeding area until the bleeding stops. Hold the pressure for at least 10 straight minutes (continually releasing the pressure to check the wound will hamper the clotting). Avoid bandages that cut off circulation.
Call your veterinarian immediately.

If bleeding is severe and on the legs, apply a tourniquet (using an elastic band or gauze) between the wound and the body, and apply a bandage and pressure over the wound. Loosen the tourniquet for 20 seconds every 15-20 minutes. Severe bleeding can quickly be life-threatening get your animal to a veterinarian immediately if this occurs.

Internal
Symptoms: bleeding from nose, mouth, rectum, coughing up blood, blood in urine, pale gums, collapse, weak and rapid pulse.
Keep animal as warm and quiet as possible and transport immediately to a veterinarian.
If the bleeding is still severe, try to stop it. If bleeding is from a cut pad or paw, apply a dressing using a piece of absorbent bandage or clothing. If the bleeding persists and is soaking through the bandage, don't waste any more time, since this is a medical emergency. Most bleeding wounds will require medical or surgical treatment. If the wounds are treated within 4 hours, they can often be sutured. Deep cuts treated after four hours have increased risk of infection and complication, and require more extensive surgery.

READ AN ARTICLE ABOUT HOW
TO GIVE A FIRST AID TO A BLEEDING DOG
at WWW.ANIMALS.HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM



DOG MEDICINE & VETERENARY
Vomiting
Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Give the pet ice cubes for two hours after vomiting stops, then slowly increase the amount of water and foods given over a 24-hour period.
Call your veterinarian.
Step 1: Remove all food and water for at least 12 to 24 hours.
Step 2: If vomiting contains blood or is frequent, contact the veterinarian immediately. If not, proceed to Step 3.
Step 3: After 12 to 24 hours of no vomiting, introduce water gradually at 1 to 2 ounces at a time. If no vomiting occurs, offer a bland diet of boiled skinless chicken and rice (50:50 mixture). If this is held down, transition to regular diet over the next 2 days by mixing an increasing quantity of regular dog food with bland diet.
Step 4: Pepto-Bismol can be safely used for dogs. Call the veterinarian for recommended dose.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Paralysis
It is extremely important to immobilize the spine of a suddenly paralyzed pet before and during transportation.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Drowing
Suffocation by drowning is caused by lungs filling with water or other fluid. Some pets can seemingly recover from a near drowning incident, only to succumb to a collection of fluid in the lungs (known as pulmonary edema) hours later. This phenomenon is known as "dry drowning" and can be fatal. For this reason, all pets that have fallen into a pool or other body of water should be evaluated by a veterinarian and observed for complications.

Remove him from the water.
Place him on his side with his head and neck extended. It's preferable to have the head slightly lower than the body to promote drainage of water from the lungs and to avoid inhalation of stomach contents (aspiration).
To expel water from the lungs and stomach, pull the tongue forward and gently push on the chest wall and stomach. Take care to avoid being bitten. Begin CPCR, formerly called CPR, as required.
Cover the pet with a blanket to avoid further heat loss.
Seek veterinary help as soon as possible.
Secure the water source to prevent other pets and children from gaining access and falling in.

READ AN ARTICLE ABOUT HOW
TO GIVE A FIRST AID TO A DROWING DOG
at WWW.ANIMALS.HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM



Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Sunburn
Sunburn is damage to the tissues caused by exposure to the sun's rays and ultraviolet radiation. Animals are usually covered by hair, fur, or pigmented skin that protects them from the harmful rays of the sun. Any circumstance that removes this natural protection may allow the pet to receive enough ultraviolet radiation to burn. If your pet has a shaved or non-pigmented area, you may apply a sunscreen that contains PABA as the active ingredient. Some sunscreens contain other drugs (such as zinc) that may be harmful if ingested.

Prevention is much better than treatment. Keep your pets out of direct sunlight.
If your pet must be in the sun, apply sunscreen containing PABA as you would for yourself, and prevent your pet from licking it off.
If your pet has burned, apply liberal quantities of an aloe vera preparation and seek veterinary attention.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Hypothermia
When a pet's body temperature dips below 100.5 degrees, the pet is too cold and must be warmed.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Dehydration
Excess loss of water from the body or inappropriate intake of water into the body.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Burns
Burns to pets can occur from a variety of sources:
Thermal (heat-related) burns
Open flames
Electric heating pads
Hot-air dryers
Heat lamps
Hot metal surfaces such as woodstoves, engine mufflers and radiators
Boiling liquids
Hot semi-liquids such as tar
Electrical currents, primarily biting electric cords
Sunburn

Strong chemicals
Radiation
Therapeutic radiation therapy
Microwave ovens
Chemical
Muzzle the animal.
Flush burn immediately with large quantities of water.

Severe
Muzzle the animal.
Quickly apply ice water compress to burned area.

(Chemical, electrical, or heat including from a heating pad) Symptoms: singed hair, blistering, swelling, redness of skin. Flush the burn immediately with large amounts of cool, running water. Apply an ice pack for 15-20 minutes. Do not place an ice pack directly on the skin. Wrap the pack in a light towel or other cover. If the animal has large quantities of dry chemicals on its skin, brush them off. Water may activate some dry chemicals.

READ AN ARTICLE ABOUT HOW
TO GIVE A FIRST AID TO A BURNING DOG
at WWW.ANIMALS.HOWSTUFFWORKS.COM



Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Choking
Inspect oral cavity in choking emergencies
Symptoms: difficulty breathing, excessive pawing at the mouth, choking sounds when breathing or coughing, blue-tinged lips/tongue.
Use caution - a choking pet is more likely to bite in its panic.
If the pet can still breathe, keep it calm and get it to a veterinarian.
Look into the pet's mouth to see if a foreign object is visible. If you see an object, gently try to remove it with pliers or tweezers, but be careful not to push the object further down the throat. Don't spend a lot of time trying to remove it if it's not easy to reach don't delay, and get your pet to a veterinarian immediately.
If you can't remove the object or your pet collapses, place both hands on the side of your pet's rib cage and apply firm quick pressure, or lay your pet on its side and strike the rib cage firmly with the palm of your hand 3-4 times. The idea behind this is to sharply push air out of their lungs and push the object out from behind. Keep repeating this until the object is dislodged or until you arrive at the veterinarian's office.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Symptoms include difficulty breathing, excessive pawing at the mouth, blue lips and tongue. Be sure to protect yourself as well as the animal, as the pet will likely be frantic and may be more likely to bite. If the pet can still partially breathe, it's best to keep the animal calm and get to a veterinarian as quickly as possible. Look into the mouth to see if foreign object in throat is visible. If you can, clear the airway by removing the object with pliers or tweezers, being careful not to push it farther down the throat. If it is lodged too deep or if the pet collapses, then place your hands on both sides of the animal's rib cage and apply firm, quick pressure. Or place the animal on its side and strike the side of the rib cage firmly with the palm of your hand three or four times. Repeat this procedure until the object is dislodged or you arrive at the veterinarian's office.
Call your veterinarian immediately.


Parasites
Dog Parasites Infogram - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Constipation
Constipation - difficult, infrequent or absent bowel movements, is one of the most common health problems associated with a pet's digestive system. Telltale signs include dry, hard stools and straining when trying to defecate. Some dogs may also pass mucus when attempting to defecate. What Causes Constipation?

There are various reasons why a dog may be constipated:

Too much or too little fiber in his diet

Lack of exercise

Blocked or abscessed anal sacs
Enlarged prostate gland

Excessive self-grooming can cause large amounts of hair to collect in the stool

Matted hair around the anus from lack of grooming or from obesity

Ingested gravel, stones, bones, dirt, plants or pieces of toys, etc. caught in the intestinal tract

Masses or tumors on the anus or within the rectum, causing an obstruction

Side effect of medication

Trauma to the pelvis

Orthopedic problem that causes pain when a dog positions himself to defecate

Neurologic disorder

Dehydration due to other illness

If your dog has not had a bowel movement in over two days or if he strains, crouches or cries out when attempting to defecate, you should see your veterinarian right away.Note: These signs may be similar to those seen with a urinary tract problem, so it's important that you see your vet to determine the cause.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Diarrhea
Withhold food for 12-24 hours, but not water. Sometimes pets that appear to be straining are sore from diarrhea rather than from constipation. Your veterinarian can help you decide which it is and what will help. Trying at home treatments without knowing the real cause can just make things worse.
Call your veterinarian.

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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Heatstroke
Never leave your pet in the car on warm days. The temperature inside a car can rise very quickly to dangerous levels, even on milder days. Pets can succumb to heatstroke very easily and must be treated very quickly to give them the best chance of survival.

dog and puppy infograms, infographics - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!

If you cannot immediately get your pet to a veterinarian, move it to a shaded area and out of direct sunlight.

Place a cool or cold, wet towel around its neck and head (do not cover your pet's eyes, nose or mouth).

Remove the towel, wring it out, and rewet it and rewrap it every few minutes as you cool the animal.

Pour or use a hose to keep water running over the animal's body, especially the abdomen and between the hind legs, and use your hands to massage its legs and sweep the water away as it absorbs the body heat.

Transport the pet to a veterinarian as soon as possible.

dog and puppy infograms, infographics - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!

Symptoms include rapid or labored breathing, vomiting, high body temperature, collapse. Place the animal in a tub of cool water. Or, gently soak the animal with a garden hose or wrap it in a cool, wet towel. Do not overcool the animal. Stop cooling when rectal temperature reaches 103 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Sore Ears
If a dog suddenly develops a very sore ear on or after a walk, a grass seed will often be the culprit. If the problem comes on more gradually, an infection is more likely. In either case, try to stop the dog scratching at the ear and making things worse – an Elizabethan collar is most useful. Arrange to get the dog examined at the vets, as an emergency if you suspect a grass seed is the cause.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Cardiac arrest
In case of cardiac arrest resuscitation should be initiated immediately, regardless of cause! The steps of a standard resuscitation procedure: Respiration, ventilation, circulation and drugs (medicine).


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Broken bones
Deal with serious bleeding but do not apply a splint, it is painful and can cause the bone to break through the skin. Confine the patient for transport to the vet. Smaller dogs can be put in a box.

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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Smoke or Carbon Monoxide Inhalation
Fires are another possible threat to dogs. Do not risk your own life to save your dog. Leave that task to the firefighters or those trained in rescue. The signs of smoke or carbon monoxide inhalation include depression, lack of coordination, heavy panting, deep red gums, and possible convulsions. Also watch for signs of shock, which are pale or white gums, a rapid heartbeat, or rapid breathing. If suspect your pet is suffering from smoke or carbon monoxide inhalation, use the following tips to provide the dog with proper care.

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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Swollen tummy
If this happens suddenly, treat it seriously, especially if the dog is a deep chested breed such as a boxer or mastiff. There may also be gulping, dribbling of saliva and attempts to vomit. It could mean there is a life-threatening twist in the stomach. Phone the vet immediately, do not delay.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Coat contamination
If a substance such as paint or tar has got onto the coat or paws, prevent the dog from licking, as it may be toxic. Use an Elizabethan collar (obtainable from vets) if you have one. You may be able to clip off small areas of affected hair. Never use turpentine or paint removers on your dog. You can sometimes remove paint and other substances by bathing the dog in washing up liquid or swarfega, but if a large area is affected, see the vet.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Ball stuck in throat
Get to the vet quickly. Or you may be able to push the ball out by pushing on the throat/neck from the outside.
If the gums or tongue are turning blue or the dog has collapsed, try the following. You will need someone to help you. One person holds the mouth open, while the other reaches inside. Be careful not to get bitten. If you cannot pull the ball out, lay the pet on their side. Push down suddenly and sharply on the tummy just behind the last rib. The person holding the mouth should be ready to grab the ball as it reappears.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Fishhook removal
Fishhooks in the mouth may cause drooling, pawing at the mouth, or trouble swallowing. Fishhooks in the paw will cause your dog to limp. To remove a fishhook that has passed all the way through the flesh so the barb is visible, cut the hook with wire cutters and remove the pieces. If the barb is embedded, push the hook through the flesh in the direction the barb is pointed. When the barb is visible, cut the hook and remove it as described. If a hook is embedded deeply, embedded in the mouth or throat, or if it has been swallowed (even with line attached), seek veterinary assistance immediately.Most mouth wounds will heal quickly without much further care. Foot wounds should be cleaned and bandaged. If surgery was performed, keep the stitches clean and follow any diet and feeding schedules your veterinarian may want your dog to follow until the wounds are healed.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Bloated Dog
It is hard to accept the fact that a seemingly healthy dog can, within an hour, be fighting for its life. Bloat is an extremely serious, potentially fatal condition. Professional treatment is urgent and should not be delayed. Bloat seems to affect large, deep-chested dogs more than other breeds. The symptoms are dramatic and unmistakable and include excessive drooling, pacing, and agitation; an enlarged abdomen; and frequent attempts to vomit, which produces large amounts of white foam or nothing at all.

There is no satisfactory scientific explanation as to why bloat occurs. Basically, the stomach fills with gas, like a blown-up balloon. But with the balloon there is room for expansion. With the stomach there is none, so the gas places pressure on the spleen, liver, and other internal organs.

If you suspect your pet is suffering from bloat, transport the dog immediately to the veterinarian. Bloat is frequently followed by gastric torsion (turning of the stomach), which leads to shock and death in a matter of a few hours. To prevent bloat and subsequent torsion, feed the dog small meals several times a day rather than one large meal, and see that heavy exercise is avoided after meals.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Sprayed by a Skunk
Skunks are one of the major carriers of rabies in North America. Therefore, a dog's encounter with a skunk should be treated as more than just a stinky situation. Use the following suggestions to provide proper care for your pet.

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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Puncture Wound
A puncture wound on a dog may be difficult to see because it is often covered with hair. Since the most common location for a puncture wound is the bottom of the paw, the first sign may be a limp. Slightly blood tinged fur is a common sign of a puncture wound on other parts of the body. If you suspect your dog has a puncture wound, be sure to watch for signs of shock, which include pale or white gums, a rapid heartbeat, or rapid breathing. The following tips will help you treat your wounded pet.

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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Dog Bites
The problem with dog bites is that they are always infected and that there can often be internal damage underneath the wound - even if only a small puncture hole is visible on top. As a result it is always best to get them checked by a vet as an emergency if the dog is lethargic or in shock, and especially if the wounds are to the neck or body. If the dog is bright, clean the wound as for a cut and arrange an appointment with your vet.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Fits
A fit can be recognised by sudden uncontrolled, spasmodic movements, often with champing of the jaw and muscle twitches across the head and neck. The dog will often fall onto its side and will not be aware of its surroundings. Fits typically start while a dog is sleeping or resting. They may be aware that something is not quite right before hand and come to you for reassurance. Most fits only last a few minutes at the most. Afterwards the dog will be drowsy, disorientated but often hungry.

If your dog is having a fit, don't try to restrain it. You may make the fit worse and can often get bitten. Try to move or pad any furniture or hard objects on which the dog could hurt itself. Keep the room dark and quiet to reduce further stimulation. If a fit only lasts a minute or two, and the dog is coming around ok, then keep it quite and arrange a check up at the vets. If the fit lasts more than 10 minutes or the dog keeps having attacks one after another, it should be seen as an emergency.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Sore Eyes
These can be due to conjunctivitis, grass seeds or thorns in the eye, scratches to the eye or ulcers. The main thing is to stop the dog rubbing the eye or the problem will quickly worsen. If you are concerned that something like dust or bleach has got in the eye, try to flush the eye out with lukewarm water. In general, a sore eye should be seen by a vet, and as an emergency if the eye is very painful, weeping profusely or getting worse rapidly.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Unconscious Dog
Your first priority when dealing with an unconscious dog is to get the heart beating and the dog breathing. Also be sure to watch for signs of shock, which include pale or white gums, a rapid heartbeat, or rapid breathing. Use the following tips to provide proper treatment to a dog that has lost consciousness.

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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Lameness
A severe non-weight bearing lameness with a lot of pain could suggest a fracture - keep the dog as quiet as possible and contact a vet. In less severe cases, check the pads for thorns, embedded grit or a cut, and look for damaged nails. Normally dogs will lick at a sore foot so the problem will be higher up if they aren't worrying at it.

Sprains, strains and arthritis are often most obvious when the dog first gets up after resting. Keeping the dog quiet with restricted exercise for a few days, can work for mild cases, otherwise get your dog examined at the vets.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Shock
Symptoms include irregular breathing, dilated pupils. Shock may occur as a result of a serious injury or fright. Keep the animal gently restrained, quiet, and warm, with the lower body elevated.

Weak pulse, shallow breathing, nervousness, dazed eyes.

Usually follows severe injury or extreme fright.

Keep animal restrained, warm and quiet.

If animal is unconscious, keep head level with rest of body.

Another sympoms can include:

Gagging or drooling excessively (pay attention to whether the dog can swallow - if it can, a physical blockage is less likely
Standing in the "air hunger position" with its head and neck held low and in a straight line

Acting unusually agitated or frantic, pawing at its mouth, and whimpering

Coughing forcefully, wheezing, or gasping for breath

Having grey or blue gums

Having a visible object in the back of its throat

Displaying exaggerated chest movements

Collapsing

Losing consciousness

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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Bleeding Dog Nail
Nails can break off and cause pain and bleeding. The bleeding will usually stop within minutes. If this does not happen, you can try and stop the bleeding by holding cold wet cotton wool against the nail(bed). It is not really an emergency, but sometimes there is an unwanted bleeding comes out of nails and so to stop the bleeding:
Scraping a bar of soap on the nail.

Holding a wet tea bag to the point of bleeding.

I could have packed the area with a cornstarch/baking soda combination.

Since then I have spent more time researching how to cut your dog's nails and what to do if it goes wrong. I now know that my first aid was not the easiest or most effective; it was just the first method I could find that incorporated the "tools" at my disposal.

The quickest way to treat a bleeding dog nail is to use a styptic powder or styptic pencil. I now have these to hand whenever I cut Leonard's nails. To apply a styptic powder you can simply put some in the palm of your hand and then dip your dog's paw into it. This might give him or her a bit of pain so hold on tight. After that it is important to make sure there is no infection, so after the bleeding has stopped for 30 minutes you should wrap it in a bandage.

If the bleeding has not stopped within 30 minutes then you should take your dog to the vet. Also if the nail or paw area becomes swollen or inflamed in any way in the following days then again a visit to the vet will be needed.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Animal Bites
Keep an eye out for one or more small puncture wounds, tremors, nausea, vomiting, weakness, difficulty breathing, bleeding and bruising at the site of the wound.

Bites are usually inflicted on or around the head, neck and front legs

Take not of the colour and patterns on the snake

Do NOT attampt to catch the live snake

Snakes are protected and killing them is illegal

Keep your pet calm and quiet

Apply a pressure immobilisation bandage if possible

Carry your pet to the car, do not allow your pet to walk if you can help it

Transport your pet to a vet immediately

If you think your pet has been bitten by a snake, seek immediate medical attention.

Sometimes, injuries from being bitten by another animal seem minor; however, your pet should still see a vet to prevent infection and check for internal wounds.
If bleeding, apply gauze to the wound. Should the bleeding continue, apply new gauze without removing soaked gauze until you reach the veterinary hospital.



Approach the pet carefully to avoid getting bitten. Muzzle the animal. Check the wound for contamination or debris. If significant debris is present, then clean the wound with large amounts of saline or balanced electrolyte solution. If these are not available, then regular water may be used. Wrap large open wounds to keep them clean. Apply pressure to profusely bleeding wounds. Do not use a tourniquet. Wear gloves when possible.
Bite wounds often become infected and need professional care.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Stings and Insect Bites
Try to remove the sting if it is still present, although normally the first sign of a sting is a dog with a swollen muzzle or paw. If the swelling is severe and around the nose, mouth or throat it can cause breathing difficulties, so you should contact a vet. Otherwise, keep the dog quiet and cool, bathe the area with ice cold compresses if possible. If you catch the sting early you can reduce the swelling by giving your dog Piriton tablets - one human 4mg tablet to a small dog, two to three to a Labrador sized dog. Occasionally dogs can develop an "urticcarial" reaction to a sting or bite. Also known as "nettle rash", circular thickenings or plaques appear over the dog's body which can be quite uncomfortable. They will often need veterinary treatment.

Ant Bites
Ant bites will often cause pain at the site of the bite and often swelling can occur. Ant bites do not often cause severe allergic reaction however the area that has been bitten can be very irritating to the pet.

Signs:
Pet suddenly holds leg/paw up sometimes flicking and shaking the leg

Sudden redness between the toes

Licking or chewing at the site of the bite

First Aid:
Apply a cold compress to the site of the bite for 5-10 minutes

If the bite is on the foot, place the foot in a cold water bath for 5-10 minutes

Protect the area that has been bitten, the pet can cause self inflicted trauma by licking or chewing at the site of the bite. Your local vet can provide a special collar to protect the area if the pet is causing self inflicted trauma by licking or chewing

Wasp And Bee Stings
Bee stings can cause a mild or severe allergic reaction to some pets. In severe cases the airways in pets may close causing the pet to asphyxiate and the sting does not necessarily have to be near the face to cause this.

Signs:

Bees and wasps commonly sting around the mouth, lips and sometimes on the feet

Swelling at the site of the sting is often prominent

Drooling and vomiting may be present

Pain at the site of the sting

Itchiness at the site of the bite or over the whole body

Pawing at the mouth

Difficulty breathing

First Aid:

Remove the stinger if you can find it

Apply a cool face washer or wash the area with cool water

Contact your vet for further advice


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ALL THE INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY !!! No information on this website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The remedies here are submitted by numerous people from around the world, and it is impossible to verify every remedy. As such remedies should be used for academic and informational purposes only!
WARNING SYMPTOMS OF DOG POISONING
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The severity of poisoning symptoms depends largely on the type of toxin involved and how much of it entered the dog's body. Some toxins have a cumulative effect and take time to build up in a dog's system after repeated exposures. This means the earliest signs of poisoning might go undetected or attributed to a dog feeling "under the weather". In other cases, the reaction could be immediate and violent with the dog presenting obvious signs of distress.

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Warning Symptoms of Dog Poisoning

Loss of appetite: A change in a dog's eating habits is usually the first signal for many illnesses.

Drooling: This is typically a sign of nausea.

Vomiting: This can occur with or without the presence of blood since some toxins such as the rat poison Warfarin produce internal bleeding.

Diarrhea: This can occur with or without bleeding for the same reason listed above.

Rash or irritation at the contact site: This typically occurs when a toxin has entered the bloodstream via the skin.

Lethargy: This can be due to the general ill-effects of the toxin, but it might also be a sign that the toxin is affecting the heart muscle.

Loss of coordination: This symptom is typically an indication that the brain has been affected.

Tremors/seizures: This can be further sign of the brain's involvement with the toxin.

Labored breathing: Slowed heart function can cause a build up of fluid in the lungs that leads to breathing difficulty.

Sensitivity to light: Some poisons can make a dog photo-sensitive.

Onset of organ failure: Kidneys, liver, heart and other organs may begin to shut down as the toxin takes full effect.

Loss of consciousness: This is a fairly severe sign.

Non-responsive behavior: The dog may remain conscious, yet not appear to see or hear anything going on around him.

Coma: This is a most serious sign that could signal death is imminent.

Death: This is the last and final stage of a fatal poisoning.








DOG EYE TEAR DROPS
DOG PARASITES
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DOG EYE TEAR DROPS
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Tear Stains
Anyone who has a white pet knows exactly what tear stains are: a rust-colored problem that mars an otherwise cute face! What it actually is, scientifically speaking, is a discoloration of the hair under the eyes caused by excessive tearing mixed with the bacteria and yeast normally found on the skin surface thus producing a reddish-brown streak. This can occur in any breed but is most visible on white hair.

The causes of the excessive tearing of the eye falls under two main categories:

1. Irritation to the eye – this can be from allergies (environmental or food-borne), eye infections, glaucoma, or eyelash/eyelid irritation.

2. Improper draining of the tears – this can result from shallow eye sockets, eyelids turned inward, hair growth around the eye, or blocked drainage holes (puncta).

Tears usually drain into the puncta, found on the inner corner of each eye, and from there drain into a pathway in the nose. When this does not occur, the tears spill out onto the dog's face and create an ideal warm,moist environment for bacteria and yeast to flourish. This is when staining occurs.

DOG EYE TEAR DROPS

So what can we do to end this staining and restore our dog's cuteness?? Well, there are a few options, some more aggressive than others:

1. Treat your pet for allergies. This can include a prescription from your veterinarian, or something simple like a food change to see if the symptoms (tearing) is diminished.

2. Antibiotics. This will reduce the bacteria on your pet's skin so when your pet does tear, there is no bacteria to mix with and stain the hair. This is not usually a long-term solution due to the effects of antibiotics system-wide.

3. Surgery. If the problem stems from an inward-turned eyelid where the eyelashes are constantly aggrevating your pet's eyes, surgery can correct this problem. See your veterinarian for an exam to see if this is an issue in your pet. Unfortunately, there is no cure for shallow eye sockets.

4. There are many supplements on the market today to reduce or eliminate the tear staining. Some of these contain Tylosin, which is an antibiotic. These are typically the ones you want to stay away from, as we discussed earlier antibiotics are not a long-term solution. If you do choose to use a supplement, check with your veterinarian for safety information.

5. The easiest, least-risky solution is to simply allow your groomer to shave away the hair in the stained area so there is less hair to stain. Also, wash your pet's face daily to diminish the amount of tears and bacteria on the face. This will not cure the problem, but it will keep your pet looking cute and clean from day to day!








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
DOG HAS NO BREATHE
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

dog and puppy infograms, infographics

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Dyspnea, or difficulty breathing, is a serious sign.

Causes include:
Congestive heart failure
Asthma
Cancer
Fluid buildup in or around the lungs
Bronchitis
Pneumonia
Laryngeal paralysis (a condition usually seen in older pets in which they lose ability to open and close their airway)
Obstruction of the trachea
and many other conditions.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Check to see if the animal is choking on a foreign object. If an animal is not breathing, place it on a firm surface with its left side up. Check for a heartbeat by listening at the area where the elbow touches the chest. If you hear a heartbeat but not breathing, close the animal's mouth and breathe directly into its nose not the mouth until the chest expands. Repeat 12 to 15 times per minute. If there is no pulse, apply heart massage at the same time. The heart is located in the lower half of the chest, behind the elbow of the front left leg. Place one hand below the heart to support the chest.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Place other hand over the heart and compress gently. To massage the hearts of cats and other tiny pets, compress the chest with the thumb and forefingers of one hand. Apply heart massage 80-120 times per minute for larger animals and 100-150 per minute for smaller ones. Alternate heart massage with breathing.
Please note: Even in the hands of well-trained veterinary health professionals, the success of resuscitation is very low overall. Success may be slightly higher in the cases of drowning or electrical shock.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
What to do if your dog is not breathing

Stay calm

If possible, have another person call the veterinarian while you help your pet.

Check to see if your pet is unconscious.

Open your dog's airway by gently grasping its tongue and pulling it forward out of the mouth, until it is flat. Check the animal's throat to see if there are any foreign objects blocking the airway

Perform rescue breathing by closing your pet's mouth hold it closed with your hand and breathing with your mouth directly into its nose until you see the animal's chest expand. Once the chest expands, continue the rescue breathing once every 4 or 5 seconds.

If the pet has choked on a foreign body, perform the Heimlich maneuver and/or a finger sweep.

If the dog is overheated, moisten the feet and ears with cool not cold water to promote heat exchange.

Seek veterinary assistance as soon as possible.br>
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
DOG HAS NO HEARTBEAT
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
Dog Pulse and Heart Rate
The easiest place to locate a pulse is the femoral artery in the groin area. Place your fingers on the inside of the hind leg and slide your hand upward until the back of your fingers touches the abdomen. Gently move your fingers back and forth on the inside of the hind leg until you feel the pulsing blood. Count the number of pulses in 15 seconds and multiply that number by 4. This will give you the beats per minute (bpm). Pulse should be strong, regular and easy to locate.

Pulse:
Small dogs: 90-120 bpm
Medium dogs: 70-110 bpm
Large dogs: 60-90 bpm

Temperature
Normal temp. for dogs and cats: 100-102.5 degrees
Thermometer should be almost clean when removed.
Abnormalities are indicated by blood, diarrhea, or black, tarry stool.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
HOW TO CARE STRESSED DOG
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
DOG WOUND FIRST AID
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If your dog is involved in a fight or in a minor accident that results in visible wounds: cuts, puncture wounds, lacerations or torn ears etc. You will need to judge if the wounds are serious enough to need treatment by a vet or if they can be initially treated at home.

In all but the most minor of cases it is usually best that your furry friend sees the vet, if only for a quick check up the following day. With any wound there is always a real risk of infection and many seemingly minor wounds will also often require a few stitches to ensure a swifter recovery.

In cases where you are unable to stem the bleeding, and/or a wound is deep enough for you to see bone or soft tissue, or where you suspect there is any possibility of a broken bone or internal injuries, you should call the hospital immediately for emergency advice.

Superficial wounds and minor injuries as grazes, shallow cuts, minor injuries to the pads of the feet can generally be safely treated at home, but you might want to bring the dog in the next day for a check. In more severe cases it can often be helpful if you can apply some basic first aid before bringing your furry friend to the hospital. If you are not confident doing this, or uncertain what you are facing, the hospital always has an emergency on-call vet available to advise you.

Puncture wounds:
Beware of this type of wound, caused by deep bites or the penetration of a sharp foreign object such as a stick, a piece of fence wire or other items. Puncture wounds can be deceptive, usually closing up and appearing to heal quickly with minimal bleeding. In many cases, however, infection will set in beneath the surface, requiring opening up and draining. Puncture wounds should always be checked at the hospital.


Bleeding:
If your pet has been scratched bitten, or clawed, or has otherwise torn skin and tissue, you first need to stop the bleeding. Apply sterile cold compresses to the wound, several if necessary. Press firmly on the wound and check the rate of bleeding every few minutes. Bleeding from minor wounds should stop fairly quickly.

If bleeding is severe and on the legs, apply a tourniquet (using an elastic band or gauze) between the wound and the body, and apply a bandage and pressure over the wound. Loosen the tourniquet for 20-30 seconds every 15 minutes.

Note: If you cannot stop the bleeding, or the blood is bright red and spurting from the wound it can indicate arterial bleeding. This is always serious. You should call the hospital immediately.

Once the bleeding has stopped you can clean and disinfect the injured area. If you are dealing with a surface wound, for example, a severe graze, that has visible pieces of grit or other foreign material adhering to the skin, flush them away with clean cold water and gently clean the wound with an antibacterial soap to remove blood, dirt and debris. You may also need to cut the hair in and around the wound area. Pat the area dry before covering.If the wound is deep and you can see foreign objects embedded in the cut these need to be removed at the hospital. Don't attempt to remove anything deeply embedded in a wound yourself.


Infection:
The big problem with even minor wounds is the possibility of infection. Most dogs do not have a particularly "clean" lifestyle and the possibility of a wound becoming infected is high. Infections can lead to serious problems. To avoid them you need to change the dressing and re-apply anti-bacterial cream a couple of times a day. While you can apply anti-bacterial creams meant for human use as a temporary measure they're not as effective for dogs as the animal antibiotic medications/drugs we would prescribe.Monitor the wound for any signs of fever, redness or swelling and call the hospital if you notice any of these signs of infection. Those symptoms mean your dog will need an injection or more powerful oral antibiotics to combat the problem.








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
DOG FIRST AID KIT
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Making a Dog First Aid Kit

Phone numbers and your pet's medical record (including medications and vaccination history)

Veterinarian:

Emergency veterinary clinic:

Animal Poison Control Center:
888-4ANI-HELP (888-426-4435)
(there may be a fee for this call)
Know these numbers before you need them. If you do not know the number of the emergency clinic in your area, ask your veterinarian or go to the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society Web site for a searchable list of emergency clinics by state or visit MyVeterinarian.com, enter the zip code, and check the "emergency" box to get a listing of emergency providers in the area.
GauzeFor wrapping wounds or muzzling the injured animal
Nonstick bandages, towels, or strips of clean clothTo control bleeding or protect wounds
Adhesive tape for bandages

*do NOT use human adhesive bandages (eg, Band-Aids) on pets
For securing the gauze wrap or bandage
Milk of magnesia
Activated charcoal
To absorb poison
Always contact your veterinarian or local poison control center before inducing vomiting or treating an animal for poison
Hydrogen peroxide (3%) To induce vomiting
Always contact your veterinarian or local poison control center before inducing vomiting or treating an animal for poison
Digital Thermometer
you will need a "fever" thermometer because the temperature scale of regular thermometers doesn't go high enough for pets
To check your pet's temperature. Do not insert a thermometer in your pet's mouth the temperature must be taken rectally.
Eye dropper (or large syringe without needle) To give oral treatments or flush wounds
Muzzle (in an emergency a rope, necktie, soft cloth, nylon stocking, small towel may be used)To cover your pet's head.
If your pet is vomiting, do not muzzle it!
LeashTo transport your pet (if your pet is capable of walking without further injury)
Stretcher (in an emergency a door, board, blanket or floor mat may be used)To stabilize the injured animal and prevent further injury during transport

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First AidDogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

You can print out a copy of this checklist to use as a shopping list, and keep a copy on your refrigerator or next to your pet first aid kit for quick reference in emergencies.


Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid








BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES
CARE FOR BLIND DOG
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Caring for a blind dog does not have to be a burden to owners, as some may think. However, the most important thing to remember is that you should treat your dog normally and not pity him. You must ensure his safety by removing sharp object and then house train him by getting him used to verbal commands instead of the hand signals. Blind dogs can get depressed if they are ignored or if you do not show them affection (since they cannot see your expression), and that is why you should talk to them often, pet them and show them that they are not alone.

WWW.PURINA.COM - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES CARING TIPS

It has been proven that a dog owner's normal voice can be used as an effective therapy and training mechanism for blind dogs. Before touching the dog, it is highly advisable to use your normal voice so that the pet will know that you are approaching or planning to touch him or her. Also, you can also combine your voice and some heavy walking which will be more effective in alerting your dog through the vibrations made.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

Even if your dog is blind, nothing can dampen their adventurous, fun-loving spirit! Dogs cope well with the loss of their sight, and all it takes is certain changes to the way they are looked after to get them back on their paws. In fact, if allowances are made for the loss of their eyesight, your dog's life should be every inch as good as it was before. Dogs adapt quickly to visual impairment and since they are using their other senses such as hearing and smell the most, they start to rely on them even more after becoming blind.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES
Give him a halo !!!

A new product, called the Halo Vest, places a bumper between the dog and any obstacles. It is billed as the white cane for the blind dog.

One of the first things that you need to do is prepare the environment. Remove any sharp objects and make sure to keep your pet away from the stairs or places that he may fall from. Avoid moving the furniture because the dog would have to adapt each time to the new setting. You should also avoid leaving boxes and toys in walking paths. You can try marking the bottom of the stairs with a perfume and using rags of different texture in different rooms, so the dog can get used to his sense of touch and differentiate the rooms.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

You can create the "sniff" path by using various air fresheners, and your dog will get used to them quickly. After that you should place the barriers around the hot tubs, pools or any other dangerous places so you can forbid your dog from stepping into them. Additionally, you should keep your dog's water and food bowls in the same place. You can also cover the sharp corners and objects with the soft insulation, just like when people do with young children and babies.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

After that, you should adapt your dog to the new kind of house training, that means that you will have to engage other dog's senses more and reinforce commands by replacing the hand signals with the verbal signals and commands. It is similar to puppies since they have bad eyesight and they tend to rely on feel, smell and sounds. The next step is to condition your dog with words, since the dog cannot see your expressions or movements, you must teach your dogs to behave by touch or treats.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

You can teach your dog by praising him with your voice and saying "Good!" and giving him a pet or treat. The dog will remember that he has done a good thing and that he will be praised just as same the next time. If he does something that he should not, in that case raise your voice and say "Bad dog!", "No!", or "Stop!". Some people believe that blind dogs are not distracted as sighted dogs due to their impairment, so they will focus more on your voice and touch.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

You should also remember that you should never stair-train your blind dog because a blind dog should always be carried on stairs. A blind dog would be naturally afraid of heights and stairs and he can fall and tumble if he is forced to teach to go there by himself.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

Do not forget to use your voice even more and to talk often to your pet. You should do it in a normal or cheerful way. Your dog will feel less lonely and afraid of the dark. You should always let the dog know before you approach him by calling out his name. When you bring new people to the house or you meet them outside, you should always let your dog smell their hand or legs before they touch him. Some owners even attach tiny bells to them and other family members so the dog can be alerted when someone is approaching.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

You should place a unique scent on the toys or attach some noise makers to them, so the dog can find them. The squeaky toys can be a great choice too. There are also specific toys for blind dogs that can be bought at pet shops and that you can use to play hide and seek with them. Maintaining a normal routine is very important and that includes that only emotional support, but the physical too – take your dog on regular walks and let him take his time by smelling his surrounding and getting used to them.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

Blind dogs need more time adjusting and smelling around them than sighted dogs. However, you should never let your dog off leash because he can seriously hurt himself. That also means that you should never ever let him out of your sight when you are surrounded by new environments.

When it comes to indoor tips, the drinking water fountains are great, since the bubbling sounds they make can help your dog come to them more quickly. You can also keep your dog engaged and active inside by creating a crate to lounge where he can feel comfortable. If you have other animals and pets in your home, make sure to put bells on their collars or legs, so your dog can be warned beforehand and not get startled.

BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

When it comes to outdoor tips, older dogs that are usually blind cannot exercise and walk as much as younger animals. You know your dog's needs the most, so you should decide how much exercise is needed and where is the safest place for it. Your dog can get easily startled and frightened by unfamiliar sounds and especially animals, so you should not take him to the parks or places where he can get easily surrounded by strays.

If you decide to travel with your dog or simply take him for grooming, make sure to bring
BLINDNESS IN DOGS CAUSES - BLIND DOGS and PUPPIES

You should use treats and a short lead and take your dog on a tour. By using scents and rugs of different textures, your dog should pick up the clues and start adjusting. People tend to carry small dogs, but they will get very afraid and confused when the owner is not close, so they should be taught being on their own too. Do not forget that a dog always depends on his owner, and when the dog is blind, he needs to rely on his owner even more. A blind dog can live cheerfully if he is properly cared of and you can enjoy your dear furry friend's presence many years to come.

What about eyeglasses?
Although animals may have vision problems, pet eyes are not the same as human eyes. For example, dogs tend to be nearsighted. While humans can correct nearsightedness with prescription eyeglasses or contacts, dogs would never keep glasses on their face. Instead, dogs and cats with vision impairment learn to adapt to their surroundings. If you notice that your dog's vision is failing, discuss possible treatments with your vet. Sometimes vision loss is part of the aging process or can be caused by stroke, diabetes and other conditions. There are many ways you can help your pet with failing vision or blindness by providing them with a safe environment.

Helping your dog see better longer
As pet parents, we want to do everything we can to give our dogs the best lives possible. Unlike children who can grow to be self sufficient and can understand why things go wrong sometimes, domesticated dogs aren't that lucky. And when age or heredity catches up to them, as it did in the case of our dog Winnie, then it is up to us to do the very best we can to try and remedy what we can.

Keep Your Dog's Spirits High
Dogs occasionally fall into depression due to vision loss. If your dog seems unhappy and is behaving in an antisocial manner, assist him by being as upbeat and cheerful as possible. Take him on regular outdoor walks. Engage him in routine play sessions. Get him stimulating and interactive toys. Doggy toys that are equipped with scents and squeaky sounds can often be beneficial for blind dogs.








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
DOG CONSTIPATION
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Constipation - difficult, infrequent or absent bowel movements, is one of the most common health problems associated with a pet's digestive system. Telltale signs include dry, hard stools and straining when trying to defecate. Some dogs may also pass mucus when attempting to defecate. What Causes Constipation?

There are various reasons why a dog may be constipated:

Too much or too little fiber in his diet

Lack of exercise
Blocked or abscessed anal sacs
Enlarged prostate gland

Excessive self-grooming can cause large amounts of hair to collect in the stool

Matted hair around the anus from lack of grooming or from obesity

Ingested gravel, stones, bones, dirt, plants or pieces of toys, etc. caught in the intestinal tract

Masses or tumors on the anus or within the rectum, causing an obstruction

Side effect of medication

Trauma to the pelvis

Orthopedic problem that causes pain when a dog positions himself to defecate

Neurologic disorder

Dehydration due to other illness

If your dog has not had a bowel movement in over two days or if he strains, crouches or cries out when attempting to defecate, you should see your veterinarian right away.Note: These signs may be similar to those seen with a urinary tract problem, so it's important that you see your vet to determine the cause.


Please keep in mind that you should always consult your vet before making any changes to your dog's diet or administering medications (and also to be certain that he isn't exhibiting symptoms of a more serious illness or disorder).

Top 10 Dog Constipation Treatments
1. Pumpkin: Feeding your dog a little bit of pumpkin with his food is a great way to prevent and cure constipation. Pumpkin is high in water content and a great source of fiber. You can either puree fresh pumpkin or use canned pureed pumpkin. Take a look at our recipes for Pumpsicles, Pupkin pie and Howloween cupcakes.

2. Supplements: There are natural supplements available that will aid in curing a dog's constipation. They usually contain additives such as acidophilus, folic acid, and vegetable enzymes. Check with your vet for recommendations.

3. Laxatives: If your vet advises it, a mild laxative may do the trick. Of course the amount will depend on the size and weight of your dog.

4. Enema: Your vet will tell you if this is an option he wants to pursue.

5. Milk of Magnesia: A small amount of Milk of Magnesia may be all that he needs but again, check with your vet first!

6. Bran (wheat & oat): Bran works as a preventative (much like pumpkin), when added to your dog's food regularly. Ask your vet for advice on how much to add. Try our recipe for Digger's Dream Muffins with oat bran.

7. Powdered psyllium seed: Psyllium seed pull water into the stool and help move it along.

8. Mineral oil: Mineral oil helps lubricate the stool.

9. Aloe Ferox: Aloe Ferox has a beneficial effect on digestive functioning and acts as a natural system cleanser and remedy.

10. Increased exercise: Increased exercise will massage internal organs and increase blood flow in the colon.








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First AidDogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
HOW TO GIVE TO A DOG
ORAL MEDICINE and PILLS

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Whether you need to administer pain medication after a serious injury or it's just time for your pet's monthly heartworm pill, learning how to easily give oral medication to a dog is a helpful trick to know. Use the following tips to help you give either liquid or pill medication to your dog.

Liquids
Step 1: Restrain the dog. If the dog is hard to handle, you may need help restraining it.
Step 1a: Relieve the dog's apprehension by talking quietly and reassuringly.
Step 1b: Slip one arm under the dog's neck, holding its throat gently in the crook of your arm. Be sure the dog can breathe easily.
Step 1c: Pass the other arm over or under the middle of the dog, using gentle but firm pressure to hold its body against yours.
Step 1d: If necessary, apply a mouth-tie loosely so there is only slight jaw movement.
Step 2: Gently tip the dog's head slightly backward.
Step 3: Pull the dog's lower lip out at the corner to make a pouch.
Step 4: Using a plastic eyedropper or dose syringe, place the fluid a little at a time into the pouch, allowing each small amount to be swallowed before giving any more of the dose.
Step 5: Gently rub the dog's throat to stimulate swallowing.


Pills
Step 1: Restrain the dog. If the dog is hard to handle, you may need help restraining it.
Step 1a: Relieve the dog's apprehension by talking quietly and reassuringly.
Step 2: Grasp the dog's upper jaw with one hand over its muzzle.
Step 3: Press the dog's lips over the upper teeth by pressing your thumb on one side and your fingers on the other so the dog's lips are between its teeth and your fingers. Apply firm pressure to force its mouth open.
Step 4: Hold the pill between the thumb and index finger of your other hand, and place the pill as far back in the dog's mouth as possible.
Step 5: Gently rub the dog's throat to stimulate swallowing.

An alternate method is to hide the pill in cheese, peanut butter, or other yummy treat.

Blood on a dog can be a sign of a serious injury or just a slight nick to the paw. In the next section, we'll discuss how to spot the various signs and what to do to help a bleeding pet.








OLD DOG CANINE TEETH TRAUMA
DOG TEETH TRAUMA
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Of course not all dental problems are caused by disease, your dog's teeth could get broken or fractured by vigorous chewing on very hard objects or simply by an accidental injury when they are playing. Whenever you examine your dog's mouth, check for broken or worn teeth and encourage your pet to chew on dog chews and toys rather than stones or sticks. Prevent your dog from chewing on extremely hard substances, such as rocks, as this can damage the structure of the tooth or cause tooth breakage. Also, dogs that are allowed to roam freely are at a higher risk than those who are in a contained, safe environment.

OLD DOG CANINE TEETH TRAUMA
Traumatic Tooth Injury in Dogs
Tooth fractures refer to tooth injuries involving damage to the enamel, dentin and cement. These injuries occur either on the enamel-covered top portion of the tooth - the crown, or the part below the gum line - the root. Dogs are susceptible to traumatic tooth injuries. The most common complication involving a tooth fracture is inflammation and infection. In some instances, the tooth's crown may be missing, blood or pink tissue may also be present on or around the affected area. Otherwise, dogs with root fractures display constant discomfort and pain. The most common cause of a tooth fracture is a traumatic event or injury. A tooth may be broken, for instance, by chewing on a hard object, a blunt force trauma to the face, or a minor automobile collision.

OLD DOG CANINE TEETH TRAUMA
Tooth discoloration: the result of a pulpal hemorrhage, pulpitis and pulpal necrosis secondary to tooth trauma. Other causes include hematogenous infection of the pulp, excessive orthodontic or occlusal forces or any event causing long term disruption to the blood supply to the tooth. Dental, oral and maxillofacial trauma often exists in combination. If one injury is found there are frequently other injuries which may be less obvious.

OLD DOG CANINE TEETH TRAUMA
TREATMENT
The treatment will depend on the extent and severity of dog's trauma. Crowns and other additive dental work can be applied to repair the damaged tooth, including the use of surgery when the damage is severe. Extraction may be recommended if the tooth or root cannot be repaired, followed by a sealing of the affected area with a restorative material or lining. It is important to monitor your dog's progress following treatment, and to continue with regular tooth care and cleaning.

OLD DOG CANINE TEETH TRAUMA

Any damage or irritation to the gums can be detected during routine brushing or cleaning of the teeth. The most common complications are infection or the need for a follow-up root canal. In many cases, restricting the dog's activities is recommended until it is fully recovered. During this time, the dog's diet should mainly consist of moist food items.

OLD DOG CANINE TEETH TRAUMA
WARNING:
Improperly diagnostics and dental restorative treatment may doom the pet to continued pain and infection because symptoms of dental pain in dogs and cats are not noted in most cases. The radiographic signs of teeth that are non-vital or endodontically infected can be very subtle or non-existent, taking years to develop in some cases. Abscessed teeth rarely swell up or have any associated drainage. A dog with an improperly treated fractured limb will continue to limp and show obvious signs of the ineffective treatment. A dog with an improperly treated fractured tooth that is non-vital or has abscessed rarely show signs of pain. They continue to eat, drink and play, but live with chronic subclinical pain and infection. This will be illustrated dramatically in next month's case report.










Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
HOW TO RAISE WOUNDED DOG
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DOG FIRST AID, DOG MEDICINE, DOG VETERINARY
How to Raise a small dog.
Grasp the dog so that one hand was under her rib cage, and the second - the belly. Hold the wrist for yourself and make sure the dog is securely in your hand. Do not push it too hard. Carefully lift the dog off the ground. Make sure that your hands do not overlap dog airways.

DOG FIRST AID, DOG MEDICINE, DOG VETERINARY
How to Raise the average dog.
The average dog can pick up almost exactly the same as the small one. Grasp it as written before, but instead of having to take yourself by the wrist, keep your dog under the breasts and ass. Keep the animal firmly, shifting his weight on his hands. Do not attempt to raise a dog if you think that the animal is too heavy for you, and may fall.

DOG FIRST AID, DOG MEDICINE, DOG VETERINARY
How to Raise a large dog.
If the dog is big, do not lift it alone. Take a blanket and with the help of others gently lay it on the dog. Then grasp the corners of the blanket and together with the other start transportation.








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
HOW TO TRANSPORT
AN INJURED DOG

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Once you've restrained the injured dog, you'll want to get it to a veterinarian as soon as possible. Try not to move a hurt dog more than necessary, and have someone call the veterinarian to be certain he or she is prepared for your arrival. In the meantime, use the following tips to help you transport your pet with the utmost care.

If the Dog Can Be Lifted
Step 1: If the dog is small:
Step 1a: Grasp its collar with one hand and place your other arm over its back and around its body.
Step 1b: At the same time, pull forward on the collar and lift the dog's body, cradling it against your body.

Step 2: If the dog is large:
Step 2a: Slip one arm under its neck, holding its throat in the crook of your arm. Be sure the dog can breathe easily.
Step 2b: Place your other arm under the dog's stomach. Lift with both arms.

Step 3: If the dog is very large, slip one arm under its neck, holding its chest in the crook of your arm. Be sure the dog can breathe easily. Place your other arm under the dog's rump and, pressing your arms toward one another, lift the dog.
Step 4: Transport the dog to the veterinarian.


If the Dog Needs a Stretcher
Step 1a:A flat board must be used if a broken back is suspected.
Step 1: Use a blanket or flat board as a stretcher. If you are using a board proceed to Step 2. If you are using a blanket:
Step 1a: Place one hand under the dog's chest and the other under its rear; carefully lift or slide the dog onto the blanket.
Step 1b: Transport the dog to the veterinarian.


Step 2: If you are using a flat board:
Steps 2b and 2c
Step 2a:
Depending on the size of the dog, use a table leaf, an ironing board, a large cutting board, or a removable bookshelf. Make sure whatever you use will fit in your car.
Step 2b: Place 2 or 3 long strips of cloth or rope equidistant under the board, avoiding the area where the dog's neck will rest.
Step 2c: Place one hand under the dog's chest and the other under its rear; carefully lift or slide the dog onto the board.
Step 2d: Tie the dog to the board.
Step 2e: Transport the dog to the veterinarian.








Dog Muzzles and Harnesses
HOW TO MUZZLE
AN INJURED DOG

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Whenever you approach an injured dog, always start by protecting yourself from being bitten, which means muzzling the dog first thing. If a dog is in severe pain and is afraid, even your canine best friend may bite the hand that feeds her.

Dog Muzzle Types, Sizes, Uses, Prices - Buy Online Dog Muzzle

Make a temporary muzzle out of a length of bandage, a belt, a shoelace, or some pantyhose. If it turns out the muzzle was not necessary because your dog responded to your examination and treatment well, your dog will forgive you for having used one. If it was necessary, you'll be glad you had the foresight to protect yourself.

Approach the dog slowly, using a soothing tone of voice. If you are calm and composed, the dog may react with less anxiety.

Bring the bandage or other muzzle material, up under the dog's chin about halfway between the leather of the nose and her eyes.

Tie the two ends in one loop on top of the dog's nose.

Bring the bandage back under the dog's chin and tie another single knot under the chin.

Make sure you're not pinching the dog's tongue in the clasped mouth.

Bring the two ends of the bandage to the back of the dog's neck behind her ears and tie them in a bow.

Tie the loops of the bow into another single knot to keep the muzzle securely fastened.

The muzzle should be fairly tight, enough that the dog cannot open her mouth, but not so tight that it impedes breathing.








Dog Muzzles and Harnesses
HOW TO MAKE DOG E-COLLAR
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
HOW TO TREAT
A DOG WITH A SNAKEBITE

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Various injuries may cause unconsciousness in a dog. Poisonous snakebites are rare in North America. Most snakes are nonpoisonous, and neither poisonous nor nonpoisonous snakes will attack a dog unless provoked. But many pets are curious, and bites will occur.

If you live in or visit a snake-inhabited area, you can expect problems if you let your dog run loose. Be prepared by reading the following tips for treating snakebites.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid - Dog Snake Bite

Poisonous
The signs of a poisonous snakebite are two fang marks, pain, swelling, vomiting, difficulty breathing, and possible paralysis and convulsions. Be sure to watch for sings of shock, which include pale or white gums, a rapid heartbeat, or rapid breathing.

Treatment must begin as soon as possible after the bite. If the snake was killed, bring it to the veterinarian for identification. Otherwise, try to remember identifying marks.
Step 1: Restrain the dog if necessary.
Step 1a: Approach the dog slowly, speaking in a reassuring tone of voice.
Step 1b: Slip a leash around the dog's neck, then place the leash around a fixed object. Pull the dog against this object and tie the leash so the dog cannot move its head.
Step 1c: Muzzle the dog to protect yourself if necessary.
Step 2: Clip the hair from the bite area.
Step 3: Flush thoroughly by pouring 3% hydrogen peroxide directly on the bite.
Step 4: Transport the dog immediately to the veterinarian.

Non-Poisonous
The signs of a nonpoisonous snakebite are a U-shape bite and pain in the bite area. If you are not sure the snake is nonpoisonous, treat as poisonous. See above.

Step 1: Restrain the dog if necessary.
Step 1a: Approach the dog slowly, speaking in a reassuring tone of voice.
Step 1b: Slip a leash around the dog's neck, then place the leash around a fixed object. Pull the dog against this object and tie the leash so the dog cannot move its head.
Step 1c: Muzzle the dog to protect yourself, if necessary.
Step 2: Clip the hair from the bite area.
Step 3: Flush thoroughly by pouring 3% hydrogen peroxide directly on the bite.








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
STRONGEST DOG POISONS
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Prescription medications for people.
Drugs that might be beneficial or even lifesaving for people can have the opposite effect in pets. And it doesn't always take a large dose to do major damage. Some of the most common and harmful medications that poison dogs include:

Prescription anti-inflammatory and pain medications can cause stomach and intestinal ulcers or kidney failure.
Antidepressants can cause vomiting and, in more serious instances, serotonin syndrome a dangerous condition that raises temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure, and may cause seizures.
Blood pressure medications.

Over the counter medications.
This group contains acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen and naproxen (Advil, Alleve), as well as herbal and nutraceutical products (fish oil, joint supplements).

Pet medications.
Just as we can be sickened or killed by medications intended to help us, cases of pet poisoning by veterinary drugs are not uncommon. Some of the more commonly reported problem medications include painkillers and de-wormers.

Household products, from cleaners to fire logs.
Just as cleaners like bleach can poison people, they are also a leading cause of pet poisoning, resulting in stomach and respiratory tract problems. Not surprisingly, chemicals contained in antifreeze, paint thinner, and chemicals for pools also can act as dog poison. The pet poisoning symptoms they may produce include stomach upset, depression, and chemical burns.

People food.
Your canine companion may look so cute as he sits there begging for a bite of your chocolate cake or a chip covered in guacamole, but not giving him what he wants could save his life. Animals have different metabolisms than people. Some foods and beverages that are perfectly safe for people can be dangerous, and sometimes fatal, for dogs.

Chocolate. Though not harmful to people, chocolate products contain substances called methylxanthines that can cause vomiting in small doses, and death if ingested in larger quantities. Darker chocolate contains more of these dangerous substances than do white or milk chocolate. The amount of chocolate that could result in death depends on the type of chocolate and the size of the dog. For smaller breeds, just half an ounce of baking chocolate can be fatal, while a larger dog might survive eating 4 ounces to 8 ounces. Coffee and caffeine have similarly dangerous chemicals.
Alcohol. Symptoms of alcohol poisoning in animals are similar to those in people, and may include vomiting, breathing problems, coma and, in severe cases, death.
Avocado. You might think of them as healthy, but avocadoes have a substance called persin that can act as a dog poison, causing vomiting and diarrhea.
Macadamia nuts.Dogs may suffer from a series of symptoms, including weakness, overheating, and vomiting, after consumption of macadamia nuts.
Grapes and raisins.Experts aren't sure why, but these fruits can induce kidney failure in dogs. Even a small number may cause problems in some dogs.
XylitolThis sweetener is found in many products, including sugar-free gum and candy. It causes a rapid drop in blood sugar, resulting in weakness and seizures. Liver failure also has been reported in some dogs.

Plants.
They may be pretty, but plants aren't necessarily pet friendly. Some of the more toxic plants to dogs include:
Lilies Easter, day, tiger, Japanese and Asiatic varieties can cause kidney failure in cats. Lilies of the valley can cause heart rhythm problems and death in dogs and cats. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe
Jimson weed - also known as devil's trumpet, can cause restlessness, drunken walking and respiratory failure in dogs and cats. Toxicity Ranking: moderate.
Azaleas and rhododendrons. These pretty flowering plants contain toxins that may cause vomiting, diarrhea, coma, and potentially even death.
Tulips and daffodils. The bulbs of these plants may cause serious stomach problems, convulsions, and increased heart rate.
Sago palms. Eating just a few seeds may be enough to cause vomiting, seizures, and liver failure.
Rodenticides,if ingested by dogs, can cause severe problems.
The symptoms depend on the nature of the poison, and signs may not start for several days after consumption. In some instances, the dog may have eaten the poisoned rodent, and not been directly exposed to the toxin.

Lawn and garden products.
Products for your lawn and garden may be poisonous to pets that ingest them.

Insecticides - including sprays, bait stations, and spot on flea/tick treatments.
Ingestion of insecticides and pesticides, especially those that contain organophosphates (e.g., disulfoton, often found in rose-care products), can be life-threatening to dogs, even when ingested in small amounts. While spot-on flea and tick treatments work well for dogs, they can be very toxic to cats when not applied appropriately. Cat owners should read labels carefully, as those that contain pyrethrins or pyrethroids (a derivative of the Chrysanthemum flower), are severely toxic if directly applied or ingested.

Antidepressant human drugs - such as Prozac, Paxil, Celexa and Effexor.
Of all prescription medications, antidepressants account for the highest number of calls to Pet Poison Helpline. When ingested, they can cause neurological problems in dogs like sedation, incoordination, agitation, tremors and seizures.

Fertilizers - including bone meal, blood meal and iron-based products.
While some fertilizers are fairly safe, certain organic products that contain blood meal, bone meal, feather meal and iron may be especially tasty and dangerous to dogs. Large ingestions can cause severe pancreatitis or even form a concretion in the stomach, obstructing the gastrointestinal tract.

Amphetamine human drugs - ADD/ADHD medications like Adderall and Concerta.
Medications used to treat ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) and ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) contain potent stimulants, such as amphetamines and methylphenidate. Even minimal ingestions by dogs can cause life-threatening tremors, seizures, elevated body temperatures and heart problems.

Veterinary pain relievers - specifically COX-2 inhibitors like Rimadyl, Dermaxx and Previcox.
Carprofen, more commonly known by its trade name Rimadyl, is a veterinary-specific, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. While it is commonly used for osteoarthritis, inflammation, and pain control in dogs, if over-ingested in large amounts, it can result in severe gastric ulceration and acute kidney failure in dogs.

Batteries
Batteries can be toxic to dogs, leading to ulcers in the mouth, esophagus and stomach. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Kerosene, gasoline and tiki
Torch fluids can cause drooling, drunken walking and difficulty breathing in dogs and cats. If these products contain antifreeze, they are even more problematic. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe (potentially life threatening).

Mothballs
Especially if they contain naphthalene, can be toxic to dogs and cats, resulting in vomiting, diarrhea, increased drinking and urination, and seizures. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe (potentially life threatening).

Tobacco
Can be toxic to dogs! Ingestion of nicotine in the tobacco plant or in cigarettes or patches can lead to vomiting, tremors, collapse and death. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Unbaked bread dough
Can expand in the stomach. If the stomach twists, cutting off the blood supply, emergency surgery is needed. The yeast in the dough can also produce alcohol, leading to seizures and respiratory failure. Toxicity Ranking: mild to severe.

Windshield wiper fluid
Can contain methanol or ethylene glycol. Ingestion of methanol can cause low blood sugar and drunken walking in dogs and cats. Toxicity Ranking: mild to moderate.








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
DOG CAR ACCIDENT FIRST AID
This article proudly presented by
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Accidents involving dogs often threatened her in mortal danger. There are some simple steps that can save the life of a dog.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Finding a dog involved in the incident, first make sure that you can help her without compromising yourself. Making sure do not find yourself in danger, carefully approach the dog, giving her the opportunity to see you. Do not make any sudden movements, and do not make noise: the animal is already in shock, so do not make it worse.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Going to the dog, inspect for any visible damage to the eye. If the dog is not breathing, you may have to give her first aid. The main thing here - do not overdo it. If your dog or another dog is hurt in a traffic accident, knowing what to do can make the difference between helping the dog or making things worse (for either you, the dog, or both of you). Here is how to help a dog hurt in a traffic accident.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Move the dog must be very careful. Take the time to build a makeshift muzzle it: even the best bred dog can bite you if it becomes painful.

To make an emergency muzzle: Use whatever you have to hand, such as a piece of gauze, a torn off jacket sleeve, a piece of blanket, a tie, a sock, etc. Wrap the fabric or gauze around the dog's nose, close to its eyes, and tie firmly under its jaw. This will prevent the dog from opening its mouth.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Approach the dog cautiously and with care. Even if it is your dog and you know him well, the pain may cause him to react aggressively, which could result in injury to you from a bite or an unexpected lashing out. Talk softly, approach slowly, and if you have a restraint such as a dog muzzle, be prepared to use it. Avoid making any sudden movements and continue to speak softly. If the dog appears too frightened or aggressive, stop before moving on, and keep stopping/starting as needed until you can get close enough to help.

The dog may be in a state of shock and will probably be frightened. A frightened dog prefers to run away and hide; if the dog is still able to move, it may try to run off, so be prepared for this possibility and keep an on eye on where he heads to.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Move the dog as little as possible and with great care. Clearly you will need to get the dog off the road or street to get him out of harm's way. However, as with injured people, less movement is best in case you cause more damage. Try to enlist the help of others and find a blanket, large coat, tarpaulin, or other item which you can use to transfer the dog onto for removal.

If the dog appears to have a back injury, moving is likely to worsen things. Try to use a firm moving surface such as a board or flat, hard surface and do not bend the dog's back in any way.

Gently slide the blanket, board, or other item under the dog. Have the other helpers lift the dog with you and carry to safety or the car for transport to the vet.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Check the dog's vitals. Check for a heartbeat, breathing, fractures, etc. Look to see if there are any signs of hemorrhaging. If there is excessive bleeding, attempt to stem it by placing a clean bandage, cloth, or handkerchief on the wound and winding it around tightly. Clip it into place.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

If the dog is in shock (feels cold, weak and rapid pulse, shallow and rapid breathing, pale or muddy gums), keep the dog warm, keep the airways clear, talk to him softly and get him to the vet as quickly as possible. If he is unconscious, keep his head lower than his body; you could also try massaging his legs and body muscles to encourage blood flow.

Call, or have someone call, the vet to warn them that you're coming. Get there as calmly and quickly as you can. While transporting your dog, keep your voice calm and reassuring. If it is possible, have someone sit with the dog or be near him to reassure him. Don't add to the stress of the dog's senses by crying loudly, shouting, cursing, etc.

Listen to the vet's advice. You may need to make some very difficult decisions so try to remain logical about the situation and do what is best for your pet. Call other family members or relevant people as needed to come and be with your pet or to help make decisions.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

If you can splint a broken leg for travel to the vet, this can help immobilize it to prevent the dog from thrashing it around. Use anything firm and straight for a splint.

Always remember that any first aid administered to your pet should be followed by immediate veterinary care. First aid care is not a substitute for veterinary care, but it may save your pet's life until it receives veterinary treatment.


dog veterinary first aid help
Reanimation
If the dog is not breathing, open her mouth and make sure the airway is not obstructed. If they are loose, place the dog on one side and start rhythmically press on her chest, making two pressure in the second. If this does not help straighten a dog's neck, close to her mouth and gently blow her nose as she begins to breathe by herself.

If you confirmed that there's no heartbeat or that your pet isn't breathing, follow these steps as demonstrated here:


1. Open your pet's airway by gently extending his neck and clearing any obstructions.
2. Check for a heartbeat by placing your hands on both sides of your pet's chest, right behind the elbow/armpit area. Feel for a beat for 10 seconds before moving to step 3.
3. If there is no heartbeat, begin chest compressions and mouth-to-muzzle breathing.

To start chest compressions, follow these steps:
1. Put your dog or cat on their side.
2. Interlock your fingers with both palms facing down to administer compressions. Give 1-2 compressions per second (100-120 beats per minute) for 30 seconds.
(If your dog is < 30 pounds, make sure to do the chest compressions directly over the area of his heart.
If your dog is > 30 pounds, do the chest compressions on the widest part of his chest cavity as demonstrated here.)
3. Next, you need to give a "mouth-to-snout" breath. Do this by wrapping both of your hands tightly around your dog's muzzle so no air can escape. Give five breaths of five seconds each by blowing directly and steadily into his nose.
4. Repeat steps 1 and 2 until your pet's heart starts beating on its own.
5. Most importantly, get to a veterinarian right way. Ideally, have someone drive you so you can continue CPR.
6. Ideally, call ahead on your cell phone to the veterinary hospital, so they're prepared for your arrival.

Hopefully, by knowing how to perform, you can help save your pet's life. Keep in mind that the likelihood of getting a pet back with CPR is < 10% - even if a veterinary specialist in emergency critical care does it. When in doubt, note the warning signs that warrant an immediate trip to the vet to avoid having to do CPR to begin with.


DOG FIRST AID, DOG MEDICINE, DOG VETERINARY
Airway clearance
For this operation required two persons. The first is to keep the dog's jaws open and get the most out doggy language. The second is to carefully remove the obstacle, using pliers or a similar tool.

You will need as quickly as possible to deliver the dog to the vet.
If the dog can not move on their own, you'll have to take her in his arms. How exactly do you do this depends on its size. If the dog is very bad, do not try to pick it up, call your vet at the scene.


DOG FIRST AID, DOG MEDICINE, DOG VETERINARY

When you deliver the dog to the vet, a doctor must conduct a comprehensive inspection of the animal to determine what exactly is wrong with him. You have to be there to calm your dog, because it will still be scared.

DOG FIRST AID, DOG MEDICINE, DOG VETERINARY

DOG FIRST AID, DOG MEDICINE, DOG VETERINARY






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