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DOG POISONS & DANGEROUS FOOD
Dog Poisons, Hazardous & Dangerous Food & Toxic Plants
Common Dog Poison Control & Protection
Chocolate is deathly for dogs!
Poisonous Dog Treats and Ivy
Poisoned Dog Symptoms, Control
How to know if my Dog got Poisoned
How to prevent Poisoning of Dog
First Aid for Poisoned Dog
How to Treat Poisoned Dog?
Garlic is poisonous for dogs!
List Of Toxic Plants


DOG PUPPY FOOD

WARNING!!!
ALL THE INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY !!!
No information on this website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The remedies here are submitted by numerous people from around the world, and it is impossible to verify every remedy. As such remedies should be used for academic and informational purposes only!




ALL THE INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY !!! No information on this website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The remedies here are submitted by numerous people from around the world, and it is impossible to verify every remedy. As such remedies should be used for academic and informational purposes only!


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POISONOUS & DANGEROUS
DOG FOOD TYPES LIST

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DOG PUPPY DANGEROUS POISONOUS FOOD

DOG POISONS

DOG FOOD POISON - DOG CAN NOT EAT THIS FOOD!

DANGEROUS DOG FOOD POISON

DOG FOOD POISON

Poison dog food, treats, control the poison, dangerous dog food

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ALL THE INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY !!! No information on this website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The remedies here are submitted by numerous people from around the world, and it is impossible to verify every remedy. As such remedies should be used for academic and informational purposes only!
WARNING SYMPTOMS
OF DOG POISONING

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The severity of poisoning symptoms depends largely on the type of toxin involved and how much of it entered the dog's body. Some toxins have a cumulative effect and take time to build up in a dog's system after repeated exposures. This means the earliest signs of poisoning might go undetected or attributed to a dog feeling "under the weather". In other cases, the reaction could be immediate and violent with the dog presenting obvious signs of distress.

Dog Poisons

Warning Symptoms of Dog Poisoning

Loss of appetite: A change in a dog's eating habits is usually the first signal for many illnesses.

Drooling: This is typically a sign of nausea.

Vomiting: This can occur with or without the presence of blood since some toxins such as the rat poison Warfarin produce internal bleeding.

Diarrhea: This can occur with or without bleeding for the same reason listed above.

Rash or irritation at the contact site: This typically occurs when a toxin has entered the bloodstream via the skin.

Lethargy: This can be due to the general ill-effects of the toxin, but it might also be a sign that the toxin is affecting the heart muscle.

Loss of coordination: This symptom is typically an indication that the brain has been affected.

Tremors/seizures: This can be further sign of the brain's involvement with the toxin.

Labored breathing: Slowed heart function can cause a build up of fluid in the lungs that leads to breathing difficulty.

Sensitivity to light: Some poisons can make a dog photo-sensitive.

Onset of organ failure: Kidneys, liver, heart and other organs may begin to shut down as the toxin takes full effect.

Loss of consciousness: This is a fairly severe sign.

Non-responsive behavior:The dog may remain conscious, yet not appear to see or hear anything going on around him.

Coma: This is a most serious sign that could signal death is imminent.

Death: This is the last and final stage of a fatal poisoning.

Breathing difficulty;

Bleeding disorders;

Bleeding from various parts of the body;

Chemical burns;

Diarrhea;

Drooling;

Elevated temperature;

Hallucination resulting in over-reaction to sound or light;

Heart and organ failure;

Kidney or liver problems;

Loss of appetite;

Loss of balance - staggering;

Lethargy;

Mouth irritation;

Muscle tremor and rigidity;

Seizure;

Skin rash;

Swelling of the tongue;

Vomiting;

Weakness;









ALL THE INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY !!! No information on this website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The remedies here are submitted by numerous people from around the world, and it is impossible to verify every remedy. As such remedies should be used for academic and informational purposes only!
CHOCOLATE KILL DOGS !
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The sweet treat can lead to illness and even death in dogs. Vets say it's one of the most common causes of dogpoisoning.

Poison dog food, treats, control the poison, dangerous dog food

Chocolate Dangers
1.Chocolate is high in fat. This fat content causes your dog vomiting and diarrhea, as well as the possible development of life-threatening pancreatitis, an inflammatory condition of the pancreas.

2.Caffeine-like stimulants. Chocolate can be high in fat and caffeine-like stimulants known as methylxanthines. If ingested in significant amounts, chocolate can potentially produce clinical effects in dogs ranging from vomiting and diarrhea to panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death in severe cases.

3.Dark chocolate may be good for humans, but bad for pets. The darker the chocolate, the higher the potential for clinical problems from poisoning. As as little as 4 ounces of milk chocolate or only 0.5 oz of baking chocolate can cause serious problems in a 10-pound dog.


ALL THE INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY !!! No information on this website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The remedies here are submitted by numerous people from around the world, and it is impossible to verify every remedy. As such remedies should be used for academic and informational purposes only!

Your Dog Ate Chocolate. Now What?
Typically, your dog will vomit on his own. If not, your vet might want you to give him hydrogen peroxide to make him throw up 1 tablespoon for every 20 pounds, Wismer says. You can use a turkey baster or a medicine dropper to give him the liquid.Some pet owners bribe their dog with peanut butter in a bowl and the hydrogen peroxide around the rim, she says, seeing as pups tend to lick their bowls clean. Once your dog vomits, don't give him any food or water. If you think your dog ate chocolate, don't wait for warning signs, Wismer says. These can take 6 to 12 hours to show up.

ALL THE INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY !!! No information on this website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The remedies here are submitted by numerous people from around the world, and it is impossible to verify every remedy. As such remedies should be used for academic and informational purposes only!

Chocolate Intoxication Symptoms include:
Extreme thirst
Diarrhea
Too much energy
Pacing
Panting
Shaking
Seizures

The stimulants in chocolate stay in the body a long time. In severe cases, symptoms can last up to 72 hours. Early treatment will help your dog recover quicker and lower your costs.


CHOCOLATE AFFECTION ON DOGS









Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
STRONGEST DOG POISONS
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Prescription medications for people
Drugs that might be beneficial or even lifesaving for people can have the opposite effect in pets. And it doesn't always take a large dose to do major damage. Some of the most common and harmful medications that poison dogs include:

Prescription anti-inflammatory and pain medications can cause stomach and intestinal ulcers or kidney failure.
Antidepressants can cause vomiting and, in more serious instances, serotonin syndrome a dangerous condition that raises temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure, and may cause seizures.
Blood pressure medications.

Over the counter medications
This group contains acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen and naproxen (Advil, Alleve), as well as herbal and nutraceutical products (fish oil, joint supplements).

Pet medications
Just as we can be sickened or killed by medications intended to help us, cases of pet poisoning by veterinary drugs are not uncommon. Some of the more commonly reported problem medications include painkillers and de-wormers.

Household products, from cleaners to fire logs
Just as cleaners like bleach can poison people, they are also a leading cause of pet poisoning, resulting in stomach and respiratory tract problems. Not surprisingly, chemicals contained in antifreeze, paint thinner, and chemicals for pools also can act as dog poison. The pet poisoning symptoms they may produce include stomach upset, depression, and chemical burns.

People food
Your canine companion may look so cute as he sits there begging for a bite of your chocolate cake or a chip covered in guacamole, but not giving him what he wants could save his life. Animals have different metabolisms than people. Some foods and beverages that are perfectly safe for people can be dangerous, and sometimes fatal, for dogs.

Chocolate. Though not harmful to people, chocolate products contain substances called methylxanthines that can cause vomiting in small doses, and death if ingested in larger quantities. Darker chocolate contains more of these dangerous substances than do white or milk chocolate. The amount of chocolate that could result in death depends on the type of chocolate and the size of the dog. For smaller breeds, just half an ounce of baking chocolate can be fatal, while a larger dog might survive eating 4 ounces to 8 ounces. Coffee and caffeine have similarly dangerous chemicals.
Alcohol. Symptoms of alcohol poisoning in animals are similar to those in people, and may include vomiting, breathing problems, coma and, in severe cases, death.
Avocado. You might think of them as healthy, but avocadoes have a substance called persin that can act as a dog poison, causing vomiting and diarrhea.
Macadamia nuts.Dogs may suffer from a series of symptoms, including weakness, overheating, and vomiting, after consumption of macadamia nuts.
Grapes and raisins.Experts aren't sure why, but these fruits can induce kidney failure in dogs. Even a small number may cause problems in some dogs.
XylitolThis sweetener is found in many products, including sugar-free gum and candy. It causes a rapid drop in blood sugar, resulting in weakness and seizures. Liver failure also has been reported in some dogs.

Plants
They may be pretty, but plants aren't necessarily pet friendly. Some of the more toxic plants to dogs include:
Lilies Easter, day, tiger, Japanese and Asiatic varieties can cause kidney failure in cats. Lilies of the valley can cause heart rhythm problems and death in dogs and cats. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe
Jimson weed - also known as devil's trumpet, can cause restlessness, drunken walking and respiratory failure in dogs and cats. Toxicity Ranking: moderate.
Azaleas and rhododendrons These pretty flowering plants contain toxins that may cause vomiting, diarrhea, coma, and potentially even death.
Tulips and daffodils The bulbs of these plants may cause serious stomach problems, convulsions, and increased heart rate.
Sago palms. Eating just a few seeds may be enough to cause vomiting, seizures, and liver failure.
Rodenticides,if ingested by dogs, can cause severe problems
The symptoms depend on the nature of the poison, and signs may not start for several days after consumption. In some instances, the dog may have eaten the poisoned rodent, and not been directly exposed to the toxin.

Lawn and garden products
Products for your lawn and garden may be poisonous to pets that ingest them.

Insecticides - including sprays, bait stations, and spot on flea/tick treatments
Ingestion of insecticides and pesticides, especially those that contain organophosphates (e.g., disulfoton, often found in rose-care products), can be life-threatening to dogs, even when ingested in small amounts. While spot-on flea and tick treatments work well for dogs, they can be very toxic to cats when not applied appropriately. Cat owners should read labels carefully, as those that contain pyrethrins or pyrethroids (a derivative of the Chrysanthemum flower), are severely toxic if directly applied or ingested.

Antidepressant human drugs - such as Prozac, Paxil, Celexa and Effexor.
Of all prescription medications, antidepressants account for the highest number of calls to Pet Poison Helpline. When ingested, they can cause neurological problems in dogs like sedation, incoordination, agitation, tremors and seizures.

Fertilizers - including bone meal, blood meal and iron-based products.
While some fertilizers are fairly safe, certain organic products that contain blood meal, bone meal, feather meal and iron may be especially tasty and dangerous to dogs. Large ingestions can cause severe pancreatitis or even form a concretion in the stomach, obstructing the gastrointestinal tract.

Amphetamine human drugs - ADD/ADHD medications like Adderall and Concerta.
Medications used to treat ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) and ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) contain potent stimulants, such as amphetamines and methylphenidate. Even minimal ingestions by dogs can cause life-threatening tremors, seizures, elevated body temperatures and heart problems.

Veterinary pain relievers - specifically COX-2 inhibitors like Rimadyl, Dermaxx and Previcox.
Carprofen, more commonly known by its trade name Rimadyl, is a veterinary-specific, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. While it is commonly used for osteoarthritis, inflammation, and pain control in dogs, if over-ingested in large amounts, it can result in severe gastric ulceration and acute kidney failure in dogs.

Batteries
Batteries can be toxic to dogs, leading to ulcers in the mouth, esophagus and stomach. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Kerosene, gasoline and tiki
Torch fluids can cause drooling, drunken walking and difficulty breathing in dogs and cats. If these products contain antifreeze, they are even more problematic. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe (potentially life threatening).

Mothballs
Especially if they contain naphthalene, can be toxic to dogs and cats, resulting in vomiting, diarrhea, increased drinking and urination, and seizures. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe (potentially life threatening).

Tobacco
Can be toxic to dogs! Ingestion of nicotine in the tobacco plant or in cigarettes or patches can lead to vomiting, tremors, collapse and death. Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Unbaked bread dough
Can expand in the stomach. If the stomach twists, cutting off the blood supply, emergency surgery is needed. The yeast in the dough can also produce alcohol, leading to seizures and respiratory failure. Toxicity Ranking: mild to severe.

Windshield wiper fluid
Can contain methanol or ethylene glycol. Ingestion of methanol can cause low blood sugar and drunken walking in dogs and cats. Toxicity Ranking: mild to moderate.










Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
POISON TOXIC PLANTS
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They are pretty to look at and lovely to smell. But many of our favourite garden plants are deadly to our pets. Once eaten by a pet, they can cause problems from drooling and tummy aches to potentially deadly damage to the nervous system, kidneys and liver.

Dangerous, Toxic Plants

Dangerous, Toxic Plants

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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
DOG POISONS BY ALPHABET
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Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
POISONED DOG FIRST AID
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What to do for suspected dog poisoning?
If you think your dog has been poisoned, try to stay calm. It is important to act quickly, but rationally.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Pet poison hazards
Poisoning is a pet emergency that causes a great deal of confusion for pet owners. In general, any products that are harmful for people are also harmful for pets. Examples include cleaning products, rodent poisons and antifreeze. But you also need to be aware of common food items that may be harmful to your pet. The AVMA brochure Household Hazards offers a summary of what foods and common household items may pose a danger to your pet. Additional information and examples can be found on the other Web sites listed in this section.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

If your pet's skin or eyes are exposed to a toxic product (such as many cleaning products), check the product label for the instructions for people exposed to the product; if the label instructs you to wash your hands with soap and water if you're exposed, then wash your pet's skin with soap and water (don't get any into its eyes, mouth or nose). If the label tells you to flush the skin or eyes with water, do this for your pet as soon as ossible (if you can do it safely), and call a veterinarian immediately.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Symptoms include vomiting, convulsions, diarrhea, salivation, weakness, depression, pain.Record what the pet ingested and how much. Immediately call your veterinarian or poison control center. Do not induce vomiting. In case of toxins or chemicals on the skin from oils, paints, insecticides and other contact irritants, request directions on if and how to wash the toxin off.

Toxic Plants & Foods for Dog

If you know your pet has consumed something that may be harmful, or if the animal is having seizures, losing consciousness, is unconscious or is having difficulty breathing, telephone your veterinarian, emergency veterinary clinic or the Animal Poison Control Center hotline (888.426.4435 - available 365 days/year, 24 hours/day) immediately. There is a fee for the consultation.

Toxic Plants & Foods for Dog

If possible, have the following information available:
Species, breed, age, sex, weight & number of animals involved
Symptoms
Name/description of the substance that is in question; the amount the animal was exposed to; and the length of time of the exposure (how long it's been since your pet ate it or was exposed to it).
Have the product container/packaging available for reference.

Collect any material your pet may have vomited or chewed, and place it in a plastic sealable bag to take with you when you bring your animal in for veterinary treatment.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid

Additional Information on Animal Poisoning:

Animal Poison Control FAQs

Another resource is Killer Grapes and Other Concerns in Animal Poison Control, available on the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine's Web site.


ALL THE INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY !!! No information on this website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The remedies here are submitted by numerous people from around the world, and it is impossible to verify every remedy. As such remedies should be used for academic and informational purposes only!

Gather up any of the potential poison that remains this may be helpful to your veterinarian and any outside experts who assist with the case. If your dog has vomited, collect the sample in case your veterinarian needs to see it. Then, try to keep your pet calm and call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) at (888) 426-4435. Experts at the APCC are available to answer questions and provide guidance 24 hours a day for a $60 consultation fee.


DOG POISON FIRST AID

Poison Protection:
Pet-Proofing Your House
The best way to reduce the chances that your dog will be the victim of pet poisoning is by preventing exposure to dangerous substances. Here are a few suggestions:

Keep all medications, even those in child-proof bottles, in cabinets that are inaccessible to your dog. If you inadvertently drop a pill on the floor, be sure to look for it immediately. Supervise anyone, such as the elderly, who may need help taking medications.

Always follow guidelines on flea or tick products.

Although you can safely give some "people foods" to your pet as a treat, others are toxic. If you have any questions about what is safe, ask your veterinarian. Or, err on the safe side and give treats made specifically for animals.

Be sure any rodenticides you use are kept in metal cabinets or high on shelves where your pets can't find them. Remember that dogs can be fatally poisoned by eating an exposed rodent, so always be very cautious about using these products. Tell your neighbors if you put out rat bait, so they can protect their pets from exposure, and ask them to do the same for you.

When buying plants for your home, opt for those that won't cause problems if your dog happens to nibble on them. The ASPCA has an online list of toxic and nontoxic plants by species. If you choose to have toxic plants, be sure they are kept in a place where your animals can't reach them.

Store all chemicals and cleaners in pet-inaccessible areas of your home.


DOG POISONS









ALL THE INFORMATION PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY !!! No information on this website is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The remedies here are submitted by numerous people from around the world, and it is impossible to verify every remedy. As such remedies should be used for academic and informational purposes only!
ANTIFREEZE DOG POISONING
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Antifreeze has a smell and taste that our dogs are attracted to.

The availability of antifreeze is quite high - It is commonly spilled on the garage floor or dumped into the street when changed.

The lethal dose of antifreeze when consumed by dogs is very small. It only takes about two tablespoons to be lethal in a dog.

Generally speaking there is a lack of public awareness on how toxic antifreeze is to dogs.


Your dog may also come into contact with antifreeze that has been added to a toilet bowl. This occurs in homes where the residents will use antifreeze during the cold months to "winterize" their pipes. Even if you do not take this action in your own home, it is something to be aware of when visiting other homes, or when vacationing at a winter residence.It is the toxin ethylene glycol that makes antifreeze lethal. Because of this, dogs will consume great quantities of ethylene glycol before being repulsed by its aftertaste. By then, it is too late. It does not take a significant amount of ethylene glycol to cause fatal damage to the system; less than three ounces (or 88 ml) of antifreeze is sufficient to poison a medium-sized dog. Antifreeze poisoning affects the brain, liver, and kidneys. Ethylene glycol is also found in engine coolant and hydraulic brake fluids.

Symptoms
Drunken behavior
Euphoria/Delirium
Wobbly, uncoordinated movement
Nausea/Vomiting
Excessive urination
Diarrhea
Rapid heart beat
Depression
Weakness
Seizures/Convulsions/Shaking tremors
Fainting
Coma


Treatment
For immediate first aid, and only if you are positive that your dog has ingested antifreeze , try to induce vomiting by giving your dog a simple hydrogen peroxide solution, one teaspoon per five pounds of body weight, with no more than three teaspoons given at once. This method should only be used if the toxin has been ingested in the previous two hours, and should only be given three times, spaced apart at 10 minute intervals. If your pet has not vomited after the third dose, stop giving it the hydrogen peroxide solution and seek immediate veterinary attention.

You may want to call your veterinarian before trying to induce vomiting, since it can be dangerous with some toxins, some poisons will do more harm coming back through the esophagus than they did going down. Do not use anything stronger than hydrogen peroxide without your veterinarian's assent, and do not induce vomiting unless you are absolutely sure of what your dog has ingested. Also, if your pet has already vomited, do not try to force more vomiting.

A final word, do not induce vomiting if your dog is unconscious, is having trouble breathing, or is exhibiting signs of serious distress or shock. Whether your pet vomits or not, after the initial care, you must rush it to a veterinary facility immediately. Your veterinarian will be able to safely administer antidotes to the poison, such as activated charcoal to prevent further absorption of the toxin, and 4 methylpyrazole, which can treat antifreeze poisoning very effectively if given shortly after the consumption of antifreeze. Your dog may need to be held in intensive care to prevent kidney failure.








Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid
HOW TO TREAT
A DOG WITH A SNAKEBITE

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Various injuries may cause unconsciousness in a dog. Poisonous snakebites are rare in North America. Most snakes are nonpoisonous, and neither poisonous nor nonpoisonous snakes will attack a dog unless provoked. But many pets are curious, and bites will occur.

If you live in or visit a snake-inhabited area, you can expect problems if you let your dog run loose. Be prepared by reading the following tips for treating snakebites.

Dog Snake Bite - Press to see the FULL SIZE INFOGRAPHICS!

Poisonous
The signs of a poisonous snakebite are two fang marks, pain, swelling, vomiting, difficulty breathing, and possible paralysis and convulsions. Be sure to watch for sings of shock, which include pale or white gums, a rapid heartbeat, or rapid breathing.

Treatment must begin as soon as possible after the bite. If the snake was killed, bring it to the veterinarian for identification. Otherwise, try to remember identifying marks.

Step 1: Restrain the dog if necessary.
Step 1a: Approach the dog slowly, speaking in a reassuring tone of voice.
Step 1b: Slip a leash around the dog's neck, then place the leash around a fixed object. Pull the dog against this object and tie the leash so the dog cannot move its head.
Step 1c: Muzzle the dog to protect yourself if necessary.
Step 2: Clip the hair from the bite area.
Step 3: Flush thoroughly by pouring 3% hydrogen peroxide directly on the bite.
Step 4: Transport the dog immediately to the veterinarian.

Non-Poisonous
The signs of a nonpoisonous snakebite are a U-shape bite and pain in the bite area. If you are not sure the snake is nonpoisonous, treat as poisonous. See above.

Step 1: Restrain the dog if necessary.
Step 1a: Approach the dog slowly, speaking in a reassuring tone of voice.
Step 1b: Slip a leash around the dog's neck, then place the leash around a fixed object. Pull the dog against this object and tie the leash so the dog cannot move its head.
Step 1c: Muzzle the dog to protect yourself, if necessary.
Step 2: Clip the hair from the bite area.
Step 3: Flush thoroughly by pouring 3% hydrogen peroxide directly on the bite.




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