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and is not intended to be and is not a substitute
for professional advice.Use of this site and any
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contained on or provided through this site
is provided on an "as is" basis without any
representations or warranties or pay.
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GET A DOG !!!
Get a Dog or a Puppy!
Buy, Rescue, Adopt, Breed a Dog and a Puppy!
How to Introduce a new Dog
Puppy Related Tips and Information
New Puppy Owner Tips
Dog Breed Selector
New Puppy at home
Shelter Dogs


I WANT MY BANNER HERE!
  • THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING DOG LOVERS COMMUNITY WORLDWIDE !
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DOG IS NOT A TOY !!!
Consider hard if you can afford
and love this wonderful creature
during all it's life.

Be responsible for your dog,
if you decide to take it !
Give it all your passion, time and love
Know dog's strong and weak sides
Know dog's path of thinking
Know dog's deseases and cure it
Help your dog to have happy life !

GET A DOG !!!

Maybe now is NOT the right time to get a dog. Dogs are a very big responsibility. If you change your mind after getting a dog, or your family decides it wasn't a good idea after all, it will be the dog who suffers. Please, think twice before you get a dog! You and your family should understand these things about living with a dog:

Some dogs get big.
Some dogs bark a lot.
When you walk a dog, you have to pick up the mess.
Dogs can get sick and mess up the carpet.
Dogs can chew furniture.
Dogs shed hair.
Dogs get lonely when they are by themselves.
Dogs can chew your toys.
Dogs can get sick and cost a lot of money at the vet.
Dogs can be picky about their food.
Dogs jump on people.
Dirty dog dishes need to be washed.
Dogs need baths.
Dogs scratch, bite, and chew.
Dogs can't always understand what you are saying.
Dogs can get fleas, worms, and ticks.
Dogs can run away.
Dogs can bother the neighbors.
Dogs need to go for walks.
Dogs need things like leashes, collars, and toys which cost money.
Dogs need a pet sitter or boarding when you want to go away.
Dogs need frequent brushing.
Dogs need exercise.
Friends or family might be allergic to dogs.
Dogs need obedience training.
Dogs drool on your hands and on your clothes.
Someday your dog will die.

puppy sale

Remember: There are no any
ways out of your life for dog !

Never give it for a present
Never give it to a shelter
Never kick it
Never let it suffer
Never bring it pain
Never pass or rent it
Never throw it away
Never betray it
Never kill it !


GET A DOG !!!

ARE YOU READY FOR DOG?

Dogtime Toolbox: Are You Ready?

"You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed."
"Tu deviens responsable pour toujours de ce que tu as apprivoisé."
"Usted se convierte en responsable de lo que has domesticado"
"Sie werden für das, was du dir vertraut gemacht haben, verantwortlich"
"Si diventa responsabile di quello che hai addomesticato"
"Мы в ответе за тех кого приручили."
"אתה הופך להיות אחראי על מה שיש לך מאולף"
"你成为负责什么你驯服"

"The Little Prince"
by Antoine de Saint-Exupery

THE BENEFITS OF HAVING A DOG







BEFORE YOU GET A DOG or A PUPPY
BEFORE YOU
GET A PUPPY
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DOGSTARDAILY.COM
and
WWW.INDOORPET.OSU.EDU
and
Dr. Ian Dunbar




BEFORE YOU GET A DOG or A PUPPY

BEFORE YOU GET A DOG or A PUPPY

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BEFORE YOU GET A DOG or A PUPPY



DOG BREED SELECTOR
by WWW.PURINA.COM









Dogs and Puppies Tips & Games - Pups, Puppy, Sale, Find, Puppy Names
NEW PUPPY OWNER TIPS
This information proudly presented by
WWW.3LOSTDOGS.COM

It's around day two of life with a new puppy that most people start to ask themselves, "what the hell have I gotten myself into?". When you bring a puppy home, you are suddenly faced with obnoxious puppy behavior like whining, biting, jumping, chewing, and pooping on the carpet. And if you have done any research at all, you know that proper care and training is critical during a puppy's first few months. The things your puppy experiences now are going to affect him for the rest of his life. No pressure, right? Between managing the puppy's destructive tendencies, worrying about stuff like vaccinations and socialization, and dealing with well-intentioned but often incorrect advice from friends, family, and TV shows, a puppy parent can get a little overwhelmed. So here are some bite-sized puppy tips to get you through the next few months.

1. Get a crate.
It makes housetraining incredibly easy.

2. Let your puppy sleep in your bedroom, at least for the first few nights.
This whole experience is scary for a pup. Don’t make him sleep in the laundry room. Put the crate next to your bed so you can reassure him.

3. Baby gates are your friend.
Use them to keep the puppy out of places you don't want him to destroy.

4. Supervise, supervise, supervise.
If you cannot watch him like a hawk, he needs to be in his crate or in his "room," see below.

5. Set up a puppy room for when you can't supervise.
Pick a small area like the bathroom or kitchen, block it off with baby gates. Add a bed in one corner and pee pads or a dog "toilet" in another.

6. Pick a potty spot.
If you don't want Sparky pooping all over the yard as an adult, pick one area and take him directly there when it's potty time.

7. Set a daily routine.
Housetraining proceeds more smoothly if your puppy knows what to expect from her day.

8. Enroll in a puppy class.
Your pup will learn some basic obedience, but the real benefit of puppy classes is socialization with other puppies and people.

9. Don't believe everything you read on the internet.
Not all advice is good advice. Take everything with a grain of salt. And please, FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, stay away from Yahoo! Google Whatever Answers.

10. Make sure everyone is on the same page.
Discuss the puppy rules with your whole family. Figure out who will do what when. Pick one set of training cues and stick with them.

11. Play some puppy training games.
The rule used to be that you didn't start training a dog until he was six months old. You couldn't take a puppy any younger than that to an obedience class, primarily because the harsh methods that used to be the standard are too.

THESE PUPPY TRAINING GAMES PROVIDED by WWW.3LOSTDOGS.COM !!!

12. Don't encourage behavior that you will regret when he gets big.
Jumping up is cute when he weighs ten pounds. It won't be cute when he's 60 pounds.

13. Get your pup used to handling from day one.
Touching feet, nails, tail, ears, mouth, teeth, and belly with love. Your vet will thank you.

14. Start grooming early on.
For the same reason as above.

15. Let your puppy meet at least two new, friendly and gentle, people every day.
Socialize & Share world with your pup!

16. Take your puppy to the petstore.
Great socialization opportunity. Keep her in the shopping cart and off the floor until she's had all her puppy shots.

17. Introduce your pup to all kinds of novel things.
People in funny hats. Remote control cars. Kids playing. Agility equipment. Balloons. Cats. Car rides.

18. Socialize, don't traumatize!
Introduce new experiences slowly and never let your puppy get overwhelmed.

19. Invite friends and family to meet-the-puppy parties.
Set yourself or visit the great friendly PUPS PARTY, together with your little pooch.

20. Frozen wet washclothes and baby carrots make great chews for teething puppies.
Treats, Treats, Treats....

21. Reward good behavior, don't wait for bad behavior.
Bad habits die hard... Reward the puppy when you see him doing something you like. Don't wait until he's misbehaving to give him attention.

22. Avoid the dog park.
In addition to putting your undervaccinated puppy at risk for disease, most dogs at the dog park are quite rude by canine standards. A couple bad experiences could ruin your puppy's opinion of her own species.

23. Feed 2-3 small meals per day.
Don't leave food out for her to graze on.

24. Pick up anything you don't want to be destroyed.
Destroyed completely or partially or even cosmetically!

25. Get your puppy microchipped.
It's your best chance at being reunited with your dog if he ever gets lost. You can get this done for around $25 at your vet or local shelter.

26. Focus on what you want, not what you don't want.
For example, teach your puppy to sit when greeting people. Don't just yell at her for jumping up.

27. Watch your puppy's poops.
Disgusting? Yes. But it could save your puppy’s life. If you notice anything like diarrhea or blood, take your puppy for a vet visit ASAP.

28. Provide toys.
If you provide her with her own toys, she's less likely to chew on yours - ha! Yeah right. It's worth a shot, though.

29. Make your own toys.
Like kids who'd rather play with the box than with the toy that came in it, puppies are usually happier chewing on an empty plastic water bottle than an expensive store-bought toy.

30. Rotate through the toys.
Let your puppy have two or three toys at a time. Changing up the toy selection will keep Sparky interested.

31. Treat-dispensing toys make great puppy sitters.


32. If you think your puppy needs to go potty at all, don't hesitate to take him outside!
You'd be surprised how often puppies need to go sometimes.

33. Practice separation.
As tempting as it is, don't let Sparky be glued to your side all day. Letting your puppy have time to himself in his crate or room will help prevent separation anxiety.

34. Hellos and Goodbyes should be no big deal.
Don't make a fuss over your pup when you leave or come home. Again, prevents separation anxiety.

35. Don't get offended when your puppy chews on you.
Puppies bite. Sometimes painfully. It is NOT aggression. Do not react by yelling, smacking him, rolling him on his back or holding his muzzle shut.

36. Don't use ammonia-based cleaners.
Your puppy will think it smells like urine and it will actually encourage her to pee there again. Use an enzymatic cleaner like Nature's Miracle.

37. Visit the vet.
Take your pup for a visit when she doesn’t have an appointment. Bring some treats and ask the office staff to give her some. Make the vet's office a fun place! Call ahead first to make sure this is OK.

38. As a general rule of thumb, the number of hours a puppy can "hold it" is his age in months plus one.
So a two month old puppy should be crated for a maximum of three hours at a time, during the day. When they sleep at night, puppies can usually hold it for longer.

39. Leave the TV or radio on when you leave your puppy home alone.
For entertainment, enjoyment & boredom lack.

40. Teach good leash manners early.
Better to teach your puppy to walk nice on leash than to teach your adult dog to stop pulling on leash.

41. Remember that your puppy is a baby - don't ask too much of her.
Don't worry about whether she will perform a perfect sit / stay or heel. Plenty of time for that when she's older. Focus on socialization and having fun.

42. Take lots of pictures!
Puppyhood goes by SO fast...

43. Be prepared for your pup to become an obnoxious little brat around age 6-10 months.
Adolescence is even more challenging than puppyhood. Have fun with your teenage dog!








HOW TO INTRODUCE A NEW DOG TO EXISTING ONE
HOW TO INTRODUCE
A NEW DOG TO EXISTING ONE

This article proudly presented by
WWW.INDOORPET.OSU.EDU

Before adding a new dog to your household, the first thing to consider is whether you really want another dog just for the sake of having another dog. Although sometimes a new dog may work out to be a great companion to the dog you already have, there is really no way to know in advance if that will be the case. Dogs with separation anxiety frequently remain distressed even if there are other dogs in the house with them, and if the dogs turn out to be incompatible the new dog will introduce new problems. Once you have decided to get another dog, you'll want to make the introduction with a minimum of stress. Give some thought to choosing a new dog who can be compatible with your present dog. In our experience, conflict is least likely to occur between a male dog and a female dog. Male with male is the next best combination, female with female is the combination most likely to result in conflict. When you choose a new dog, consider your present dog's needs. For example, try not to bring a very active young dog into a home with an older dog who already has health problems such as osteoarthritis. If you do get a puppy or young dog, be prepared to "protect" the older dog from her. You will have to spend plenty of time with the new dog and offer distractions to keep her from harassing the older dog.

HOW TO INTRODUCE A NEW DOG TO EXISTING ONE

1. - Try to introduce the new dog at a time when you will have at least a weekend to be home. You will want to observe and supervise closely at first. It is best not to leave two newly introduced dogs alone before they have become acquainted and the new dog is at least somewhat comfortable in his new home.

2. - Introduce the dogs in a neutral area rather than your own home or yard.

3. - Both dogs should be on leashes for control, but try to allow them a little room to maneuver. They may be calmer if they don't feel completely restrained. You will need one adult for each dog.

3. - Have the person walking the new dog approach from the side and "catch up" to you and your dog as you walk. Pick an area where you can walk together with a little distance between the dogs. As they walk they can look at and sniff each other, but there will be other things to catch their interest as well. Try to do this in an area without a lot of other people and dogs so that neither dog is over-stimulated. The walk should end at your home.

4. - If you have a yard and the weather permits, it may help to bring the dogs into the yard before going into the house. At first, allow them on a long leash until you notice relaxed and "wiggly" body postures and interest from both dogs. Once they appear relaxed and interested in a friendly manner, you can allow the leashes to drop so that they can interact.

5. - When you first enter the house don't let the dogs jostle each other in an entryway. Try to get both into the house quickly so that one doesn't react to the other's entrance later.

6. - Make sure there is an environment of plenty. There should be more than one water bowl and more than one comfortable place to lie down. There should be plenty of toys, especially of kinds your dog likes, so that there's no reason for the dogs to have a conflict over access to them. If your dog has a history of guarding his toys, they should be removed for the initial introduction period, which may take a few weeks. This all needs to be arranged before you pick up the new dog.

7. - At first, feed your dog the way you always have done and feed the new dog in a different room. Your dog should not have to worry about feeding time, leading to problems feeding the dogs. The new dog has no expectations of your home, so he shouldn't be upset by whatever feeding spot you choose. A very food-motivated dog will eat well from the start, but some dogs may need a person with them for the first day or two.

8. - Wait until you feel confident that the dogs are comfortable with each other before offering valuable treats such as real bones, rawhide, pigs' ears, etc., and supervise when you do. If your dog is reactive with these, you may have to separate the dogs before giving them these items. If your dog never gets these kinds of treats because he is aggressive over them, that should be the rule for the new dog too.

9. - Your dog may try to keep the new dog away from things that are very important to him. He may block the new dog from approaching you, from resting places like dog beds and furniture, or from rooms like the family room or the bedroom. If the new dog is very anxious, he may do the same, trying to keep your dog away from him in certain locations, or even sticking with a family member and trying to keep your dog away. Do not scold or punish the dogs if this happens. Instead, get up and move if it looks like you will be the center of contention, and distract either dog if he seems to be invading a place where the other is resting.

10. - Keep both dogs away from areas where food is being prepared or eaten at first. If either dog is anxious about the food, there could be a conflict.

11. - Don't change your dog's sleeping arrangements. If he sleeps in your bedroom, you will have to decide whether the new dog will sleep there too. That may be the only way to avoid a lot of distress on the part of the new dog. He may have to be crated, though, at least in the beginning, to avoid problems during the night when you would be unprepared to intervene.

12. - Very few dogs coexist without disagreements. A stare, a lifted lip or a growl is a normal dog signal that he's uncomfortable with something another dog is doing. Often the recipient of these signals will stop and move away , this is appropriate. There is likely to be some of this at first. As the dogs become more comfortable with each other they should do less of this, but punishing them can have very negative results. It can turn uncertainty into fear and aversion and result in ongoing conflict between the dogs.

13. - Supervise and distract as needed to make sure serious conflicts don't arise, but don't punish this sort of behavior. Examples of serious conflicts I include staring that cannot be interrupted, hard stiff muscles and posturing that lasts more than a few seconds, or full-contact fights. Please also monitor for excessive "bullying" behavior from one dogs towards another. If you notice that one dog is repeatedly avoiding eye contact and interactions, rolling over onto his back, or attempting to escape from the other dog. This can be an indication that one dog is uncomfortable and fearful and that the other dog is not appropriately responding to his avoidance cues.

14. - Don't leave the dogs together when they are alone in the house until you're reasonably sure that they are comfortable with each other. The new dog especially may be very anxious when left with your dog at first. If they can be crated, fine. If not, perhaps they can be gated apart. It may be difficult to separate them behind closed doors. Leave them for very short periods at first to make sure no problems arise when you are gone.

15. - Supervise play between the dogs at first. Dogs who are not well acquainted may do some rough play at first and this can result in growling or snapping. Be prepared to distract and redirect the dogs to another activity if play becomes too intense. As the dogs become more familiar with each other they usually learn to modulate their play.

16. - Any situation that raises the level of excitement in your environment should be avoided at first. The more time the dogs have to become acquainted before they have to deal with visitors or other disturbances the better. If you have children, do not let them or their friends interact with the two dogs without adult supervision.

17. - Remember that the new dog will have no idea at first how to signal that he needs to eliminate. Treat him as though you were beginning to housetrain him until he understands your routine. Try not to let him have accidents in the house; sometimes one dog will mark over the elimination of the other leading to housesoiling problems.

18. - As time goes on you will learn more about the new dog's personality, but be careful at first of overwhelming him. People should not hug or kiss him, and there should be no rough play.

19. - Especially at first, avoid doing things to either dog that require restraint, such as grooming or bathing, in front of the other. A dog may attack the restrained dog if he is anxious about him.

20. - When using treats during daily activities, be sure there are plenty for each dog. You might start out with less attractive treats so as to avoid aggression over them.

21. - Be patient and keep in mind most dogs get along well once they are accustomed to each other.






ADOPT A DOG!

Adopt a dog, dog shelter

10 REASONS TO ADOPT AN ADULT DOG




Puppies are not housebroken! Most people work during the day and are gone for 8 hours or more at a time. Puppies need to go out on a regular schedule so they have frequent opportunities to eliminate where you want them to. Puppies can't wait for the boss to finish his meeting or the kids to come home from school. Adult dogs can "hold it" for longer periods and, often, a Rescue will have the dog housebroken before it is adopted.

Intact Underwear. Puppies chew! You can count on at least 10 mismatched pairs of socks and a variety of unmentionables rendered to the "rag bag" before a puppy cuts all its teeth. Shoes? yes, puppies like to chew them also. Expect holes in your carpet (along with urine stains), backs and pages missing from books, stuffing exposed in couches, and at least one dead remote control. No matter how well you watch them, it will happen. This is a puppy's job! An adult dog can usually have the run of the house without destroying it.

A Good Night's Sleep. A puppy can be very demanding at 2am and 4am and 6am. Puppies naturally miss their littermates and a stuffed animal is not a substitute for puppy pile with littermates in the dark of night. Prefer peace and quiet, an adult rescue dog usually sleeps through the night?

Finish the Newspaper. With a puppy loose in the house, you will NOT be able to relax when you get home from work. Do you think kids ever really feed the dog? Clean up the messes? Walk in the pouring rain every hour to get the dog housetrained? If so, you probably have a severe case of denial. An adult dog will generally sit calmly beside you as your workday stress flows away and your blood pressure lowers as you pet it.

Easier Vet Trips. Puppies need a series of puppy shots and fecals, then a rabies shot, then surgery to spay/neuter them, and generally a trip or two to the emergency vet after eating something dangerous. (All of this usually adds up to substantially more than you paid for the dog!) When adopting an adult dog, the adoption fee should get you a dog with current vaccinations, this is altered, heartworm negative and on a preventative, at the minimum.

What You See Is What You Get. How big will the dog get? What will its temperament be? Is it easily trained? What will its personality be like as an adult? Will it be hyperactive? Adult dogs are, to steal a term from Internet lingo, WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get.) All of your questions are easily answered, because the dog is already an adult. You can pick large or small; active or couch potato; goofy or brilliant; sassy or sweet. Further, the rescuer and/or foster homes can help guide you in choosing just the right match for you. (Rescues are FULL of puppies who became the wrong match as they got older!)

Unscarred Children (and Adults). If a puppy does not teeth on your possesions, it will teeth on you and your children. Rescuers often get calls from panicked parents sure their dog is about to seriously injure their children. It usually turns out the puppy is just doing what puppies do, i.e., mouth or nip. Parents, too emotional to see the difference, just want to get rid of the dog. A growing puppy is going to put anything and everything in their mouth. It must be taught bite inhibition. As the puppy grows, the puppy's jaws become stronger and its teeth are replaced by its adult teeth. The mouthing and nipping it did as a puppy now can have serious consequences. Far better to get an adult dog that has "been there, done that, moved on."

Matchmaker Make Me A Match. Puppy love is emotionally appealing. They are so cute! But, in reality, cute is not a sufficient reason to get a pet, a pet that will probably live 15+ years. It may be cute, but cute can grow up to be hyperactive. It may be not want to share your home with anyone else, including your spouse, children, or other animals. It may want to be a couch potato, when the main reason you got the dog was to run with you every day. Pet/owner mis-matches are the MAIN REASONS owners "give-up" their pets. 60% of the animals in shelters nationwide are there for this reason. Good rescuers extensively evaluate of dogs and applicants to insure both will be happy with one another until death do them part.

Instant Companion. With an adult dog, you have a dog that can go everywhere and do anything with you NOW. You don't have to wait until the puppy grows up and hope it will like to do what you to do with it. With an adult rescue, you select the dog most compatible with you. You can find one that travels well, loves to play with your friends' dogs, has excellent house manners, etc. You can come home after a long day's work and spend your time on a relaxing walk, ride, or swim with your new best friend, rather than cleaning up after a small puppy.

Bond - Rescue Dog Bond. Dogs that have been uprooted from their happy homes or have not had the best start in life are likely to bond very closely to their new owner. Yes, dogs that have lost families through death, divorce or lifestyle change can go through a mourning process; however, once they become attached to their new family, they seem to want to please as much as possible to make sure they are never homeless again! Those dogs that are just learning about the good life and good people seem to bond even deeper. They know what life on the streets, life on the end of a chain, or worse, is about, and they revel and blossom in a nurturing , loving environment. Most rescues make exceptional , extremely loyal companions.



Sadly, some people seem to think dogs that end up in rescue are genetically or behaviorally inferior. In reality, rescues get dogs that have outlived their novelty with impulsive owners who really did not have the time, energy or willingness to shoulder either the responsibility or expense required to be a good dog owner.

Choosing an adult rescue over a puppy does not guarantee you will never have any problems with a new pet, it just increases the probability that you won't. Of course, with any new pet, there is an adjustment period while the dog learns what you expect of it. The difference is that an adult dog, specially chosen for various traits compatible with you and your home situation, are not having to learn as much as a growing puppy, so they usually fit into their new families very quickly. For most of us, an adult dog is much more suited to our needs than a puppy.

Dog and Puppy infograms, infographics - (c) by Mary Nielsen - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!

Cute as they are, puppies are a tremendous responsibility and, with the busy schedules that most of us have, impossible to housebreak completely, socialize well, and train adequately. If you are not able or willing to do what is necessary to raise a puppy correctly, you may end up wanting to surrender a dog yourself!
Adopting an adult rescue can be the best decision, and addition to your family, that you ever make. Rescue a dog and get a devoted friend for life! Go ahead, do a "GOOD DEED," adopt a dog in need of a home. Give a dog a chance it otherwise would not have. But, beyond doing a "good deed", do yourself a favor and adopt an adult dog.



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ADOPT A DOG WORLDWIDE:


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READ THIS
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(Download PDF file)



RSPCA's PUPPY FIRST YEAR TIPS - INFOGRAPHICS, PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!

READ RSPCA's PUPPY's FIRST YEAR TIPS
at !!!
WWW.RSPCA.ORG.UK



http://www.akc.org
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BUY A DOG or a PUPPY WORLDWIDE:

USA:
PUPPYFIND.COM
BREEDERINFOCENTER.COM
CUTEPUPPIESFORSALE.NET

USA & Canada:
PUPPYTRADER.COM
NEXTDAYPETS.COM

UK:
DOGSANDPUPPIES.CO.UK

Israel:
PETNET
YAD2.CO.IL
HOMELESS.CO.IL
WINWIN.CO.IL

Ukraine:
EMARKET.UA

Russia:
AVITO.RU
DOG-SALE.RU

Europe:
EUROBREEDER.COM
EUROPUPPY.COM
PUPPYFINDE.COM

Greece:
PETSTOREVIP.COM
STRAYSOFGREECE.ORG
WELLBREDPETS.ORG

Australia & New Zeland:
DOGZONLINE.COM.AU
OZDOGGY.COM.AU
PUPS4SALE.COM.AU
Japan:
DOGZONLINE.COM.AU
ARKBARK.NET

OAE (Dubai):
PETSHOPDUBAI.COM

India:
DOGSINDIA.COM
DOGSPOT.IN
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LETSLIVETOGETHER.ORG




Terrier Puppies for sale

How to prepare for a new puppy
Humorous but true!

Pour cold apple juice on the carpet in several places and walk around barefoot in the dark.

Wear a sock to work that has had the toes shredded by a blender.

Immediately upon waking, stand outside in the dark and in the rain for at least 20 minutes saying, "Be a good puppy, go potty now - hurry up - come on, lets go!"

Cover all your best suits with dog hair. Dark suits must use white hair, and light suits must use dark hair. Also float some hair in your first cup of coffee in the morning.

Play "catch" with a wet tennis ball.

Run out in the snow in your bare feet and underwear to close the gate.

Tip over a basket of clean laundry, scatter clothing all over the floor.

Leave your underwear on the living room floor, because that's where the dog will drag it anyway. Especially when you have company.

Jump out of your chair shortly before the end of your favorite TV program and run to the door shouting, "No no! Do that OUTSIDE!" Miss the end of the program.

Put chocolate pudding on the carpet in the morning. Don't try to clean it up until you return from work that evening.

Gouge the leg of the dinning room table several times with a screwdriver - it's going to get chewed on anyway.


If this sounds a bit overwhelming, especially if you work full-time, you may want to consider adopting an adult dog:

Of course, there is something a puppy can do, at least initially, better than an adult dog: Take a warm, cuddly blanket out of the dryer and wrap yourself in it immediately. This is the feeling you get when a puppy falls asleep on your lap. Be sure to have someone help you return to reality by having them throw a bucket of ice water on you... then read 1 through 11 again!

CAUTION: AVOID BUYING A DOG FROM A PET STORE.

Most dog lovers know about the often horrid conditions of puppy mills, the unregulated breeding facilities owned by disreputable breeders. Dogs are often bred far too frequently, are kept cramped together in squalor, and are not socialized with humans. In addition, these breeders do not always care about the health and strength of the breed, which often results in genetic illnesses, poor health in general and unlikable personality traits. But many of these same dog aficionados, who have t-shirts and bumper stickers denouncing puppy mills, don't know that most puppies sold at pet stores come from there.

There are some pet stores that buy their puppies from commercial kennels regulated by the Department of Agriculture. However, even these pups tend to be unhealthy and unsocialized. This is partly due to the fact that commercial kennels tend to breed many different breeds in one facility and they breed for quantity, not quality. Therefore, their interest does not lie in the healthy promotion of a certain breed but rather in how many sales they can get. So, before you buy that cute puppy in the window, consider the downsides of pet store pups:

BUY SALE DOG PUPPY
10 Reasons Not to Buy Pet Store Puppies

1. Bad Health: Because so many pet store pups come from puppy mills, they are not the result of careful breeding and they are usually not well cared for before coming to the store. Some common illnesses and conditions are neurological problems, eye problems, hip dysplasia, blood disorders and Canine Parvovirus.

2. Behavioral Problems: Because breeding is indiscriminate, behavioral problems are not weeded out generationally. You'll also find that a pet store's staff is not likely to have any training in dealing with behavior issues so the puppies continue to do the wrong things, which become habit.

3. No Socialization: Pet stores pups are often pulled away from their litter at far too young an age, often at only four or five weeks. The earliest a puppy should be separated from his pack is eight weeks and most reputable breeders will say at least 10 weeks. This lack of time socializing with his siblings means that puppy will not develop important canine skills. Likewise, a puppy who has not been handled by people from about three weeks will not naturally socialize well with them.

4. The Downfall of the Standard: In a broad sense, purchasing a puppy from a pet store and then breeding her means you are ruining the standard of that breed because the previous breeders were not concerned with it.

5. Lack of Information: A member of a pet store staff is not an expert on a breed and often not on dogs in general. Purchasing a puppy from a store means you will not get the lowdown on that breed or likely help with any behavioral or other questions.

6. Return at Your Puppy's Peril: Most pet stores do offer a warranty of sorts where you can bring the puppy back if he has problems. They don't tend to tell customers that the puppy's fate, once returned, is usually euthanization.

7. Housebreaking is a Chore: Pet store puppies have spent all their short lives in cages. They do not have the opportunity to develop the natural canine instinct of eliminating away from their food and bed. This causes problems when you try to housebreak them.

8. What You See Isn't Necessarily What You Get: If you see what looks like a Maltese in the window, you may find, as she grows, that there's a little Maltese in there somewhere but mostly she looks like a Terrier. There is no guarantee you will get a purebred dog if that's what you are after.

9. Poor Value: A puppy from a pet store generally costs between $400 and $2,000. This is often more than you'd pay at a reputable breeder who can ensure you get a healthy puppy and provide support afterward.

10. Questionable Pedigree: You're paying for a pedigree, or AKC papers, when you buy a puppy from a pet store but it's very likely that it's not genuine. If the papers are genuine, it still doesn't mean the puppy is a good example of its breed - you need a reputable breeder to prove that.

What are our options other than pet store puppies?
Find a reputable breeder or adopt your next dog from the local animal shelter or breed-specific rescues!

Reputable breeders are knowledgeable about the breed they represent and can help with behavioral and physical issues that might come up later. These breeders socialize their puppies early on, breed in good traits and breed out bad ones and they can show you your puppies' parents and give you their history. Human Societies, local animal shelters and breed rescues are all good places to look. True, you don't have the benefit of meeting your pup's parents but rescued puppies are thoroughly examined for any illness or condition, are socialized by staff and trained early on. Also, if you adopt a mixed puppy you will likely find he is very healthy as mutts are often healthier than purebreds.

So the next time you see that adorable puppy in the window, pause and think about the downsides of pet store pups. Buying from such a store is, in essence, supporting them and the horrible practice of puppy mills. And it is also almost a sure bet that you'll have a bad experience.






PUPS

A puppy is a juvenile dog.
Some puppies can weight 1.5kg,
while larger ones can weigh up to 10.4 kg.
All healthy puppies grow quickly after birth.

(c) by WIKIPEDIA


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