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DOG vs CAT
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DOG vs CAT















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dog vs cat
Dog vs Cat: Tracks, Paws & Steps
Dog and Cat: Who loves us More?
Dog Vs Cat Fight, Movies, Comparison
Dogs and Cats Friendship & Relationships
Who Makes a Better Pet: Dog or Cat?
Dog and Cat Funny Photos & Videos
Comparison, Similarities, Differences
Deafness in Dogs vs Cats
Dog vs Cat Vision
Dog vs Cat Vaccination
Dog vs Cat Taste
Rare Wild Dogs vs Cats
Blind Dog vs Blind Cat
Dog vs Cat Fleas and Ticks
Dog vs Cat Food
Dog vs Cat Body Language & Signs
Dog vs Cat Memory
Dog vs Cat Teeth
Albino Dog vs Cat
Minecraft Dogs vs Cats
Dog vs Cat Age Comparison
Play Dog & Cat Free Online Games
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Dog vs Cat Art
Cat vs Dog


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dog and cat, dog vs cat
WHY DOGS ARE BETTER
THAN CATS

This article proudly presented by
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Bradley Trevor Greive

dog cat

Why Dogs Are Better Than Cats Book:
by Bradley Trevor Greive


Teaming up on their first collaborative effort, bestselling author Bradley Trevor Greive and award-winning photographer Rachel Hale explain once and for all Why Dogs Are Better Than Cats.

dog cat

Now, before all you cat lovers find your fur standing on end, Greive is quick to stress that he is simply "prodog, not anticat. The purpose of this book is not to criticize cats or their owners, but to champion the many exceptional virtues unique to dogs."

dog and cat, dog vs catdog and cat, dog vs cat

Although Greive admits that there is something to be said for "soft, warm, and sleepy" (a.k.a. cats) as captured in Hale's cuddly feline photographs, he concludes that dogs would be the only ones with character enough to admit this fact, thereby once again positioning themselves as the superior pet, confidant, admirer, and friend.

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dog and cat, dog vs cat
DOG vs CAT: COMPARISON
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CAT           DOG
Kingdom Animalia Animalia
Family Felidae Canidae (Canis lupus familiaris)
Phylum Chordata Chordata
Class Mammalia Mammalia
Order Carnivora Carnivora
Genus Felis Canis
Species F. catus C. lupus familiaris
Hunting ability Cats still have their hunting ability. Due to their domestication, dogs have a weaker instinct to hunt. most breeds of dog's teeth are too small to rip open a deer's throat, indicating an adaptation to a different diet.
Life Expectancy 12-25 years 7-20 years
Grooming Less frequent - no baths Less frequent if short-haired, very frequent if longer-haired to avoid matting
Loneliness Can be left alone during the day Can be left alone during the day if necessary, but usually require attention throughout the day. Varies widely between breeds.
Space Can live in small apartments Depends on breed
Annual cost $450 $660 (varies depending on the breed)
Affection Very affectionate towards owners sometimes, but are more independent Affectionate if taken care of
Protection Do not guard owners Some are protective of their owner.
Medical Costs Approx. $160 per year Approx. $290 per year
Good with children Can be; depends on the cat If socialized. Some small dogs are OK with children but are fragile if handled roughly. Wait until children are 8 years old before getting a dog. Ironically, some small breeds are the most agressive.
House training Easily trained to use a litter box One to two weeks, if trained properly as puppies
Energy Generally lazy; can sleep for 16 hours a day depends on age and breed
Walks Some cats like walks Dogs need exercise; a daily walk.


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DOG vs CAT BODY LANGUAGE, COMMUNICATION SIGNS - COMPARISON, SIMILARITY & DIFFERENCE
DOG vs CAT BODY LANGUAGE
This article proudly presented by
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and
Mikkel Becker

Can cats and dogs ever be friends? Some can, while others will fight like — well, like cats and dogs. Why the inconsistency? The problem may be that the two species don't always speak the same language. Cats and dogs communicate with us and with each other, through body language. When using body language to interpret what our pets are saying, it is important to consider both the context and the pet's individual personality. While certain physical cues commonly appear in both cats and dogs, those cues don't always mean the same things, and it's important to know the differences in order to better understand your cat or dog.

DIFFERENCES OF
BODY LANGUAGE & SIGNS

Here are a few examples of behaviors that may communicate dramatically different things for each species:

Tail Held High:
When a cat holds her tail high, it can signal that she is friendly and relaxed. The higher the cat's tail, the more confident she may be. However, if her tail is raised high with the fur erect and puffed out, it usually indicates alarm or potential aggression. As she becomes more unsure or fearful, her tail is more likely to slink lower.

When a dog holds his tail high, on the other hand, it often signals high arousal and the possibility of aggressive behavior. A dog that is agitated and about to aggress may also flick his tail back and forth vigorously. A dog is more likely to carry his tail in a neutral position, extended out behind him, when he is relaxed.

Wagging Tail:
Friendly dogs wag their tail loosely back and forth at medium height. When a cat's tail begins to wag back and forth, an unfriendly encounter or predatory attack is likely to occur.

Closed Mouth:
Relaxed Cats have closed mouths, Relaxed Dogs may have a closed or partially open mouth. The more tense a dog is, the more tightly closed his mouth becomes, although a very stressed dog may pant heavily or yawn.

Ears Up for Greeting:
A cat who is confident greeting people will normally hold her ears forward and alert. If her ears move backward or twitch, it may indicate uncertainty or that the encounter is not going well. By contrast, one sign of a friendly dog is that his ears move back just slightly. A submissive dog will move his ears back even further as an appeasement gesture. Dogs with erectly pricked ears may be ready to stand their ground against another animal if necessary. but this behavior is specific to the individual dog.

Turning to The Side:
Both dogs and cats turn their bodies to the side when attempting to shut off a potential threat. A dog may do this in order to show that he means no harm, while a cat may be trying to appear larger and more threatening to her opponent.

Lying Belly Ip:
A dog is likely to lie on his back as a submissive greeting behavior or as a way to get his belly rubbed by someone he's close to. A cat, on the other hand, will lie on her back in self-defense; this position allows her to have all four paws, with claws drawn, ready to react to any threat. A cat will sometimes lie on her back for people she's close to, but very few cats actually enjoy having their belly rubbed and may respond aggressively.

SIMILARITIES OF
BODY LANGUAGE & SIGNS

Sometimes Your Cat and Dog Are Speaking the Same Language. Your cat and dog may not always be on the same page, but they do share some behaviors. Here are a few that they have in common.

Ears Upright:
Cats and dogs both communicate through their ears. When they are relaxed, their ears usually point forward. When they are really excited or interested in something, their ears are likely to move all the way forward and upright. When the ears move backward and are flattened against the head, there’s often underlying fear or submission.

Raised Hackles:
When cats and dogs are feeling frightened or overstimulated, the hair on their back and tails fluffs out and stands on end. In both dogs and cats, hair standing on end indicates an animal ready to react.

Pupil Dilation and Blinking:
A cat's pupils dilate when she is afraid or is getting ready to attack. Similarly, a dog's pupils will dilate when he is fearful or aggressive. Dilated pupils can also indicate high arousal in both species. Eye blinks in dogs and cats indicate the desire for a peaceful greeting, while direct eye contact, without blinking or looking away, can signal a challenge in both dogs and cats.

Compacted Body:
When a dog or cat is afraid of something, he will make his body appear as small as possible, usually with the head held low. Similarly, both dogs and cats curl their tails underneath their bodies to indicate extreme fear.

Whiskers Stiffened:
Dogs and cats both have a normal height and structure to their whiskers. When they are stimulated by something and are about to react, their whiskers are more likely to stiffen and extend outward.

Panting:
Panting can indicate various things in dogs, but in both species it can mean that the animal is highly stressed or frightened. Panting in a cat that is not interacting with another animal or in a fearful situation may indicate a serious health condition, and a veterinarian should be contacted immediately.

Yawning:
While yawning in dogs can indicate stress, both dogs and cats may yawn as a calming behavior in conflict situations.








DOG AND CAT PAWS COMPARISON - DIFFERENCE & SIMILARITY, DOG & CAT PRINTS, DOG vs CAT TRACKS, PAWS & STEPS IDENTIFICATION, DIFFERENCE - HOW TO DISTINGUISH CAT TRACKS and STEPS?
DOG & CAT IDENTIFICATION:
TRACKS, PRINTS, PAWS & STEPS

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Cats and dogs use their paws for more than just walking. Both dogs and cats have four paws that get them around, cushion their body weight and allow them to manipulate objects. While Fluffy's and Fido's paws might appear similar at first glance, a closer inspection reveals quite a few differences between the two. When spotting tracks in the sand or snow, you may be wondering what type of track it is and whether it is a canine or feline paw print. Besides walking, cat and dog paws also serve other functions. Dogs sweat from their paws, can maneuver objects, dig holes or impress your friends with a friendly shake. Kitties probably won't shake paws with your guests, but they can climb with their paws, use them as weapons and shred food or perhaps, on occasion, things in your home best left un-shredded. There are some easy ways to differentiate between the two. Knowing the anatomy and shape of canine and feline paws will help determine whether you are following a dog or a cat. The most commonly found tracks can sometimes be confusing. How do you tell the difference between the tracks of dogs and cats? Was that track you found on the trail left by a mountain lion or a big dog?

Feline Paw Anatomy
Feline front paws have a total of seven pads. There are five digital pads, one large plantar pad (heel pad) and one small wrist pad. Feline back paws have a total of five pads. There are four digital pads and one large plantar pad (heel pad). Typically felines have five nails on the front paws, one each to the digital pad. Due to a genetic disorder, some felines may have up to seven nails. Felines have four nails on the back paws, one to each digital pad.

Canine Paw Anatomy
Canine front paws have a total of six pads. There are four digital pads, one large metacarpal pad (heel pad) and one carpal pad. Canine back paws have five pads. There are four digital pads and one large metacarpal pad (heel pad). Canines have five nails on the front paws, one each to the digital pad. Canines have four nails on the back paws, one each to the digital pad. Sometimes canines have a fifth nail higher up on the paw called the dew claw and in many instances this is removed when young.

DOG AND CAT PAWS COMPARISON - DIFFERENCE & SIMILARITY, DOG & CAT PRINTS TRACKS, PAWS & STEPS IDENTIFICATION, DIFFERENCE - HOW TO DISTINGUISH CAT TRACKS and STEPS?

Feline Paw Shape
The shape of a paw is identified by the shape of the pads as well as the placement of the pads. The overall feline paw is a circular shape and the digital pads are teardrop shaped. The feline plantar pad has three lobes on the hind end that are aligned with one another and two lobes on the front end. The most notable difference is the placement of the front two toes (or pads). In felines they are not close together - one pad print is higher than the other.

Canine Paw Shape
The canine paw is more oval and the canine digital pads are triangular. The canine metacarpal pad has two lobes on the hind end with one lobe on the front end. With regard to the placement of the front two toes, the canine's toes are aligned and close together.

Pads
Cats and dogs have pads on the bottom of their feet that act as a cushion. Your cat's front paw has seven pads. Five are digital - sort of like a person's toes. There's also a large pad on the heel, called the plantar pad and a small one on the wrist or carpal area. In contrast, your dog has a total of six pads - four are digital, one on the heel and one on the carpal area. Your dog also has a dewclaw, sometimes referred to as a dog's thumb, on the inside of each front leg. The dewclaws never make contact with the ground.

Nails and Claws
Cats have retractable claws, meaning they can extend them or sheathe them. When a cat is relaxed, walking or playing gently, the claws are sheathed. If your kitty needs a tool or a weapon to bring down that mouse, however, the claws will be extended. In contrast, your canine has nails that are always extended, similar to a person's fingernails.

Paw Prints
While both the feline and canine have four toes on both the front and back feet, the main difference is shown by the inclusion and exclusion of claws in the prints. A canine paw print will always have claw marks whereas the feline paw print will not show any signs of claws because of the ability to retract them. If the cat is running, then the claws may be visible. Front tracks are larger than hind tracks in both felines and canines. Since feline paws have a toe (pad) that is ahead of the other, this enables you to determine whether it is the front left or front right paw. If the toe that is furthest ahead is on the right, this is the left paw. If the toe that is furthest ahead is on the left, this is the right paw. Canine prints do not have this distinction due to the front two toes being aligned.

DOG AND CAT PAWS COMPARISON - DIFFERENCE & SIMILARITY, DOG & CAT PRINTS, DOG vs CAT TRACKS, PAWS & STEPS IDENTIFICATION

There are some clues that will help you tell the difference between dog and cat tracks. Dogs include such species as red and gray foxes, coyotes, wolves and domestic dogs. Cats include mountain lions, bobcats, lynx, and domestic cats. Lynx tracks have some unique features of their own, so are not treated here. What is said here should apply to bobcats, mountain lions and domestic cats. If you look closely, you can sometimes even tell the difference between right and left tracks, as well as front and hind tracks.

Front tracks are usually larger than hind tracks. This is true for both dogs and cats. The tracks of these two species are frequently confused because dogs are one of the only animals that make tracks of the same approximate size and shape as those of the cougar/mountain lion.

DOG AND CAT PAWS COMPARISON - DIFFERENCE & SIMILARITY, DOG & CAT PRINTS, DOG vs CAT TRACKS, PAWS & STEPS IDENTIFICATION, DIFFERENCE - HOW TO DISTINGUISH CAT TRACKS and STEPS?

What makes Dog track

A: The claw marks. Dogs usually show claw marks in their tracks. However, it is possible to see claw marks in cat tracks, but this is usually when the animal is running or pouncing.

B: The lack of a third lobe on the hind edge of the heel pad. See cat tracks below for the difference. Although it is visible in some dog tracks, the third lobe is located higher, not aligned with the other two as it is in cats.

C: The shape of the leading edge of the heel pad is a single lobe. See cat tracks for difference.

D: The alignment of the front two toes. They are side-by-side, or very close to it, in dogs tracks. There are exceptions, such as when the animal is making a turn or walking on a slope.

E: The almost triangular shape of the pads of the outer two toes. Take a look at the photo to see this more clearly as my drawing is not the best for indicating this feature.

F: Dogs have a little point where the heel pad turns. Cats share this feature.


DOG AND CAT PAWS COMPARISON - DIFFERENCE & SIMILARITY - HOW TO DISTINGUISH CAT TRACKS and STEPS?

What makes Cat track

A: Note that the front two toes are not lined up side-by-side as the dog prints were. The toe that is further forward is analogous to a human middle finger - your longest finger. The alignment of this toe will tell you whether you have a left or right track. This toe is the inner toe of the leading pair.

B: The leading edge of the heel pad has two parts, or lobes.

C: The hind edge of the heel pad has three parts, or lobes. They are aligned with each other.

D: This is the front track. One clue that tells you this is that the edge of the heel pad is relatively straight. See hind track for difference.

E: Cats have a little point where the heel pad turns. Dogs share this feature.








DOG AND PUPPY TEETH VS CAT TEETH
DOG vs CAT TEETH
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Dana Scott

DOG AND PUPPY TEETH VS CAT TEETH

Dental Growth
Like people, dogs and cats have two sets of teeth. The initial smaller set, called deciduous teeth, includes incisors, canines, and premolars. As the puppy or kitten grows, the permanent teeth push their way out. The "baby" teeth roots absorb, causing the teeth to fall out. To fill in the void in the back of the now larger adolescent jaws, an additional set of teeth, the molars, emerge. In dogs, this entire transition is usually complete by 5-7 months of age, with a total of 42 adult teeth. Cats generally grow in their 30 adult teeth by 5-6 months.

DOG AND PUPPY TEETH VS CAT TEETH
Dog vs Cat Raw Food
Raw Feeders: Why Are You Feeding Your Dogs Like Cats? Take a look at the following pictures of the skulls of two different animals:

DOG AND PUPPY TEETH VS CAT TEETHDOG AND PUPPY TEETH VS CAT TEETH

Look at the difference in the shape of the shape and number of teeth. Do you think these animals should be eating the same foods? Clearly, these are different animals with different needs. In fact, they are about as different as cats and dogs! What The Mouth Tells Us About Diet?

DOG AND PUPPY TEETH VS CAT TEETH

See those pointy teeth that both dogs and cats have? They are called canine teeth and they are meant to tear and rip flesh. In fact all of the teeth of the dog and the cat are pointy, so that, in addition to the pronounced canine teeth, gives us a good idea that they are both meant to eat meat. They are both carnivores. Let's compare that to our own omnivorous teeth!

DOG AND PUPPY TEETH VS CAT TEETH

Now let's look again at the teeth of the dog. You can see they also have molars at the back of their mouth. They are pointier but they have them. They also have a sharp, interdigitation but they are clearly there and they look capable of grinding. Compare that to the cat, where the molars are very sharp and elongated and much, much less capable of grinding.

DOG AND PUPPY TEETH VS CAT TEETH

So the dog's mouth is somewhere between the human mouth and the cat's mouth. You might also have noticed that dogs and humans have a lot more teeth than cats too.

DOG TEETH, JAWS

Dogs have four times more pancreatic amylase than cats and the activity of the enzyme rises much more in dogs with the amount of starch content in the diet. This means dogs can digest over 99% of processed starches and about 90% of many raw starches. The cat's ability to digest starch is more limited.

DOG AND PUPPY TEETH VS CAT TEETH

DIGESTIVE TRACT
Differences between Dog and Cat:

Dogs have More teeth

Flatter molars

Dogs have More pancreatic amylase (four times as much)

Dogs experience More amylase activity

Dogs own Longer digestive tract (nearly twice as long)

Can convert some plant based ALA to DHA and EPA (cats can't)

Can manufacture taurine (cats can't)

If we move down the digestive tract, you will see more fundamental differences between the dog and cat. The average length of the dog's digestive tract is 2 feet. The average cat's digestive tract is 13 inches. Here are a few more differences between the digestive systems of dogs and cats:

Dogs can convert approximately 5 to 15% of plant based ALA (Alpha-linolenic acid), which is a type of omega-3 fatty acid found in plants. Cats completely lack the enzymes necessary for this conversion.

And finally, dogs can manufacture taurine (an amino acid from animal protein), whereas cats can't. Clearly cats must eat a predominately meat-based diet, but dogs are a little fuzzier in that definition.










Dog Memory vs Cat Memory: Long-term, Short-term, General
DOG vs CAT MEMORY
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and
Linda Cole

Cats are not as excitable as dogs. They have to maintain their "coolness" after all. Felines do associate sights, sounds and smells, though. If they didn't, the electric can opener would never be successful at training a cat to come running when "it" calls out. A cat's brain functioning has been compared to that of a two to three year old child and, when compared to a dog, a cat's memory is almost 200 times more retentive. Without repeated and reinforced training, a dog's memory span is about 5 minutes. But as any cat owner knows, felines are more selective, and remember what they think is useful to them.

Dog Memory vs Cat Memory: Long-term, Short-term, General

Short term memory for a dog is about 2 minutes, cats remember much longer, up to 16 hours. Long term memory is harder to determine. We know dogs have a long term memory because they can remember hand signals and words for their lifetime. Cats have an excellent memory when it comes to remembering people they have a strong bond with. On the other hand, if a cat has been mistreated by a human, she will remember. If you have an adopted shelter cat who avoids men, young boys wearing hats, or women who wear a lot of makeup, it's likely your cat has a memory that triggered a response to avoid those people as a threat. That's why it can be difficult to earn an abused or neglected cat's trust.

Dog Memory vs Cat Memory: Long-term, Short-term, General

When it comes to long term memory, what is amazing to me are the many stories of dogs and cats that became lost or were relocated, and walked thousands of miles to find their way back home. Sometimes it was not a person they had bonded with and missed, but another pet and for some, it was getting back to an area they were familiar with. Was it their memory of the person or place they loved that kept them going? Researchers think they understand a dog or cat's memory, but their science isn't exact and more studies need to be done. Of course, you know your dog remembers a whole lot of stuff longer than two minutes. Those memories, claims the study, are associative memories - a cat associating the cat carrier with the danger going to the vet, for example.

Dog Memory vs Cat Memory: Long-term, Short-term, General

A cat's cerebral cortex contains about twice as many neurons as that of dogs. Cats have 300 million neurons, whereas dogs have about 160 million. In fact, cats have more nerve cells in the visual areas of their brain, a part of cerebral cortex, than humans and most other mammals.








BLIND DOGS MYTHS, FACTS, INFORMATION, TIPS, INFOGRAMS, VIDEO, PHOTO
BLIND DOG vs CAT
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SEEING EYE CAT
FOR BLIND DOG
Eight-year-old Labrador Retriever Terfel was diagnosed with cataracts, a common eye condition that caused the lenses in his eyes to cloud over and become opaque. As his cataracts continued to worsen, Terfel became hesitant, reserved, choosing to spend most of his time curled up in his doggie basket rather than venture out into a once-friendly world that had suddenly become so unfamiliar and frightening.

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Terfel's outlook on life changed drastically the day that his owner, Judy Godfrey-Brown of Holyhead, North Wales, took in a small stray cat. Godfrey-Brown could hardly believe her eyes as she watched the little cat gently lead Terfel around the garden. It was as if the cat sensed Terfel's condition and knew instinctively that the blind pup needed a friend.


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BLIND DOG vs BLIND CAT
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BLIND DOGS vs CATS:
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DOG and CAT: FACTS
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Care, Equipment
Cats require a food and water bowl, a litter box, a few toys and scratching posts, and a brush for grooming.

Dogs require a food and water bowl, a leash and collar, a dog bed, toys and chews and treats.


Feeding
The amount a cat needs to eat varies depending on its size, but is less than a dog. Cat food comes in dry or canned wet form. Adult cats require between 250 and 300 calories per day.

The amount a dog eats depends on its size. Commercial dog food comes in both dry and wet forms, and most dogs need between 25 and 30 calories per pound per day


Grooming


Bathing
Cats do not need bathing, but they should be brushed regularly if they have long hair.

Dogs especially those with long hair - need grooming and bathing frequently.


Health
The average life expectancy of cats is around 12 to 14 years, but they can live into their 20s or even their 30s. Medical costs for cats are around $160 per year.

The life expectancy of dogs varies depending on the breed. They range from 7 years to 14 years. The oldest dog was 26 years old. Medical costs for dogs vary depending on size, but are estimated between $210 and $260 per year.


House Training
Cats can easily be trained to use their litterbox. This requires cleaning once a day.

Dogs need to be trained, socialized and housebroken.

Cats usually already know how to use a litterbox.

Dogs will need to be trained for about 2 months to be fully trained.

Protection
Dogs can function as watchdogs or guard dogs, protecting their owner and the house.

Cats only watchers. They do really nothing, even not screaming, while thief or weirdo comes into your house


Space
Cats can live in smaller areas, while dogs generally need more space to run around. Cats can be kept indoors, but dogs need to be taken for regular walks – at least twice a day.


Tricks
Although some cats will learn to do tricks, they do them to please themselves, not their owners, and so are more difficult to train.

Most dogs can be trained to do some tricks with patience.


Your Work
As dogs need more personal attention than cats, they are less well suited to people who travel a lot or work long hours. Dogs should preferably not be left home alone all day, while cats will cope.


Cost
According to the ASPCA, a typical cat costs $670 per year, including food, litter and medical costs.

A small dog cost approximately $580, while a medium sized dog costs $695 and a large dog costs $875.


Popular breeds
The most popular cat breeds in the US are the Persian, the Maine Coon, the Exotic and the Siamese.

The most popular breeds of dog in the US are Labrador Retriever (with over 123,000 registered individuals), Yorkshire Terrier (48,346), German Shepherd (43,629) and Golden Retriever (42,962).

There are approximately 78.2 million pet dogs in the US. 39% of US households own at least one dog. On average, dog owners have one dog.

According to US census data, there are around 86.4 million pet cats in the US. 33% of households in the US own at least one cat. On average, cat owners have two cats.


Common Games
Cats enjoy simple games that allow them to stalk and pounce. Popular games include bouncing a ping-pong ball on the floor for the cat to jump after, rolling a crumbled ball of paper along the floor, dragging ribbon along the floor, or playing hide and seek.

Dogs enjoy games that allow them to run and chase. As well as playing "fetch," dogs enjoy playing tug-of-war, hide and seek, find the treat, and running races.

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CHOOSE: DOG or CAT
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How to choose
When choosing between a cat or a dog, you should consider how much time you can dedicate to the pet (dogs require more time than cats, and don't like to be left home alone), how much you can afford to spend (dogs are more expensive than cats), and what temperament of pet you would before (dogs are more needy and affectionate than independent cats).

dog vs cat

When choosing a cat, consider whether you want to get a purebred cat from a breeder, or rescue a cat from an animal shelter. If you are not getting a kitten, consider whether you want an indoor or an outdoor cat and choose accordingly, as certain cats will be trained for different situations. Different breeds have different temperaments, but they vary less than dogs. For example, Siamese cats are intelligent and playful, but can be very noisy, while long-haired cats are laid back and short haired cats are usually affectionate and even-tempered. Individual cats also have different personalities, so interact with them before taking them home. Consider the hair length you can handle, as longer fur, such as the fur of a Maine Coon, Persian or Ragdoll, will require daily brushing.

dog vs cat

When choosing a dog, consider its size. Larger dogs, such as a German Shepherd or a Labrador, need more space and cost more to feed and care for. Some breeds, such as Labradors, Corgis and Spaniels, are also easier to train than others, and have more friendly temperaments. Take into account the length of the dog's fur, as those with longer coats will need more regular grooming. Although purebreds are popular, they can suffer from greater temperament and health problems. Mixed breed dogs usually have fewer health problems and can be adopted more cheaply from shelters.

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DOG PEOPLE vs CAT PEOPLE
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FAMOUS DOG LOVERS



DOG vs CAT

FAMOUS CAT LOVERS



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"Dog people" and "cat people" really do have different personalities, according to a new study.

People who said they were dog lovers in the study tended to be more lively - meaning they were more energetic and outgoing and also tended to follow rules closely.

Cat lovers, on the other hand, were more introverted, more open-minded and more sensitive than dog lovers. Cat people also tended to be non-conformists, preferring to be expedient rather than follow the rules.

Cat lovers scored higher on intelligence than dog lovers.

dog cat

More people said they were dog lovers than cat lovers: About 60 percent of participants identified themselves as dog people, compared with 11 percent who said they were cat people. The rest said they liked both animals, or neither animal

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Dog lovers found companionship to be the most attractive quality in their pet dogs, while cat people liked the affection from their cats.

Dog lovers tend to be more extroverted (or outgoing), and conscientious (or rule-following).

DOG vs CAT

10 DIFFERENCES BETWEEN DOG & CAT PEOPLE
A tale as old as time: cat lovers pitted against dog lovers in a battle over who's really got life figured out. Assumptions have been made and stereotypes created in attempts to settle the score in the past, but science has come to the rescue to set the record straight. The definitive answer? Well, it's still a bit biased depending on your stance. Why? Because just like they do in pet preference, cat and dog lovers seek and prefer different qualities in life and relationships than dog people. In a study of 600 college students, researchers found that each group shared similar, maybe controversial, characteristics according to their furry friend of choice. Allow me to explain with a list of the 10 most significant differences between dog lovers and cat lovers that were pulled from this study!

dog cat

1. Dog lovers listen
Not too surprisingly, dog people tended to be more obedient in nature. According to an article in the Huffington Post, dog lovers "followed the rules more closely", while cat lovers "tended to be non-conformists, preferring to be expedient rather than follow the rules". Those of you who've ever tried to call your cat to you when you have company over probably understand this one.

2. Cat lovers are smart
This is where things get controversial. In the study, cat people scored higher on the test of intelligence than dog people. While this doesn't necessarily hold true to all people in each group, higher intelligence test scores tended to fall within the cat-people category.

3. Dog lovers keep things lively
Live Science's article on this same study also noted that dog people were more lively. Meaning that they were friendlier and more energetic. Cat people, on the other hand, didn't seem to carry the same qualities as frequently in the study.

4. Cat lovers keep an open mind
As with the intelligence finding, this doesn't necessarily mean that dog owners are the opposite. Rather, cat people were more consistently found to be a bit more open minded than were the dog lovers. This was based on general appreciation of art, unusual ideas, adventure, and an overall sense of curiosity and experience.

5. Dog lovers love people
It's no secret, cats can be a bit standoffish. In this same way, their owners tend to be less outgoing as well. Dog owners, however, were found to enjoy the company of others more. A potential reason for this was offered by the Huffington Post, noting that the lifestyle of a dog owner is a bit more active to begin with as owners take their pets outside and to parks where they have more opportunity to socialize with others.

6.Cat lovers seek affection, dog lovers look for companionship
Maybe not so surprising but interestingly noted in the Live Science article was that cat people seek affection from their pets while dog people were more after companionship. Study researcher Denise Guastello notes on this that "It's possible that people may select pets based on their own personality. For example, cats are often seen as independent animals that keep to themselves, and are cautious of others."

7. Cat lovers are sensitive
Often times, people see sensitivity as a bad thing. This isn't necessarily the case. Cat people were found to be more sensitive in this study, while dog owners showed fewer signs of sensitivity in provided tests.

8. Dog lovers represent a larger portion of people
Live Science reported that 60% of study respondents said they preferred dogs while just 11% reported a preference for cats (the rest said they either like both animals equally or didn't like either animal). Looks like dog owners win the popularity vote!

9. Cat lovers prefer solitude
According to research reported by Modern Dog magazine, cat owners were one third more likely to live alone and twice as likely to live in an apartment or flat. Dog ownership was more closely related to living in a house with a spouse and/or family members.

10. Dog lovers are dominant
In the same study reported on by Modern Dog magazine, researchers noted that cat owners tended to possess fewer qualities associated with dominance than dog owners. These qualities included assertiveness, self-confidence, forcefulness, and persistence.

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DOG AGE vs CAT AGE
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DOG vs CAT LOVE:
WHO LOVES US MORE ?

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The eternal dispute between dog and cat lovers will probably never end. However, scientists have found out which out of our feline or canine friends love us more. As part of a new BBC2 documentary called "Cats v. Dogs", hosted by animal experts Chris Packham and Liz Bonnin, a neuroscientist has investigated which species prefers humans. We already knew that, like humans, dogs release the "love hormone" oxytocin. This test has never before been done on cats. A couple of small-scale studies have shown that when owners interact with their dogs, the human and their dog appear to release oxytocin. Itэs one of the chemical measures of love in mammals. Humans produce the hormone in our brains when we care about someone. For example, when we see our spouse or child the levels in our bloodstream typically rise by 40-60%.The neuroscientist checked the oxytocin levels in both cats and dogs after playing with their owners. He took saliva samples from 10 cats and 10 dogs on two occasions - 10 minutes before a playtime session with their owners and immediately after and tested both samples for oxytocin. The results show the hormone increased by an average of 57.2% in dogs but only by 12% in cats. This means in theory, dogs love their humans more than cats do. Еhe dog level of 57.2% is a very powerful response. It shows these dogs really care about their owners. It was also a nice surprise to discover that cats produce any at all. At least some of the time, cats seem to bond with their owners. Some think that cats don't actually like their owners at all - this study at least proves that wrong. Cats beat out dogs in one area, however - they are better at surviving. A study of 2,000 fossils has revealed that the felids are much better at surviving than canids. A team of scientists found that cats have played a significant role in making 40 dog species extinct. Cats often out competed dogs for food rations because they are generally more effective hunters. No evidence has been found that dogs have ever wiped out a cat species.








RARE WILD CATS vs RARE WILD DOGS
RARE WILD DOGS vs CATS
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MINECRAFT DOGS vs CATS
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DOG TASTE vs CAT TASTE
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Omnivore vs. Carnivore
Though cats and dogs are the most common household pets in North America, the similarities practically end there. Their needs and preferences for food, water and socialization are quite distinct. Below, Illinois-based cat and dog nutrition expert Linda Case and Dr. Trisha Joyce of New York City Veterinary Specialists reveal some key differences.

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As cats and dogs were becoming domesticated, they developed according to the food sources available to them. "The evolutionary history of the dog suggests a predilection for a diet that is more omnivorous in nature, while the history of the cat indicates that this species has consumed a purely carnivorous diet throughout its evolutionary development," explains Case.

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Cats evolved into meat eaters that need a whole lot of protein (about 26 percent of their total caloric intake), but dogs can subsist on a more varied diet (only about 5 percent protein). Joyce says dogs can eat many different foods, but cats would have serious nutritional deficits because they require protein from meat.

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Their taste buds differ as well. While both dogs and cats have a high proportion of taste buds that are sensitive to amino acid flavors (or proteins), only dogs respond to sweet foods. This means, for one, that you don't have to hide that pan of brownies from your cat. "You have to be careful to keep a dog away from chocolate," says Joyce. "It's dangerous for them. Cats can't metabolize it either, but the concern is not the same because they would never eat the massive quantities of it that a dog would."


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Pack Animal vs Loner
Both dogs and cats become accustomed to eating at specific times, but only dogs seem influenced by the social setting of the meal. "Dogs tend to increase food intake when consuming food in the presence of other dogs in their social group," says Case. "This process is called social facilitation." For most dogs, social facilitation causes a moderate increase in interest concerning food, as well as a tendency to eat faster.

Dogs are so prone to the influence of others that even their owners can impact their food choices. In one study summarized by Case, a group of dogs had the choice between a small and a large portion of kibble. Most chose the large. But when their owners were brought in and the dogs watched as they chose the smaller plate, their own choice changed in the second trial, as they chose the tiny serving. A similar experiment used equal portions in two different bowls. Each dog was consistently more interested in whichever bowl its owner preferred.

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Joyce adds that cats seem to be emotional eaters. "My clients often tell me that their cats go to the food bowl when they're happy, like when the owner arrives home."

Dog & Puppy taste & flavor, Dog Flavours

Thirst vs Dry Mouth
While both dogs and cats need an adequate supply of clean water, the definition of "adequate" differs between the two. "Dogs typically consume more water per unit body weight than cats do, and respond more rapidly to mild dehydration by voluntarily increasing their water consumption," says Case.

Dog & Puppy taste & flavor, Dog Flavours

Cats' relatively weak thirst drive is attributed to their evolution from a desert-dwelling species. As a result of low water consumption, cats produce more concentrated urine than dogs, which helps to conserve the little water they do take in. However, it also leaves them at greater risk for bladder stones, rock-like deposits that can interfere with their ability to urinate, causing symptoms like blood in the urine and passing urine outside of the litter box.


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One Meal a Day vs Many
"Cats are natural grazers," says Joyce, noting that it's more common for cats to be on free-feed diets than dogs. The reason for this may be partly a function of anatomy. While the stomach of each animal acts as a reservoir for the body, allowing food to be ingested as a meal rather than continuously throughout the day, a dog's stomach expands more readily. "The proximal section of the stomach is capable of expansion, a function that is assumed to be of greater importance for dogs, which tend to eat large meals at a given time," says Case.

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Keeping the above differences in mind, pet owners can rest assured that they are adhering to what nature intended and continues to insist on.








DOG VISION and EYES
DOG vs CAT VISION
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HOW DOGS SEE THE WORLD

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DEAFNESS in DOGS vs CATS
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ALBINISM IN DOGS vs ALBINISM IN CATS
ALBINO DOG vs ALBINO CAT
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DOG vs CAT
TRICK COMPETITION

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We all know you can train a dog but training a cat to do anything must seem very unlikely to most of us. After spending so much time with cats I sometimes think that it is them that teach us. In fact, clicker training can be very effective with cats as this video shows so remarkably. Who wins, the cat or the dog?

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DOG & CAT FOOD
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DOG & CAT FLEAS
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Cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) are a different species than dog fleas (Ctenocephalides canis). However, their differences are best distinguished through the use of a microscope.

Despite their name, cat fleas are capable of affecting dogs and an array of other animals as well as humans. The majority of North American flea problems are cat flea infestations. If your pet is exhibiting symptoms of a flea problem, it is likely that they are hosting cat fleas. Dog fleas are most common in Europe, although in rare cases, they appear in North America, as well

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Symptoms of flea infestation include excessive itching, red skin and secondary infections. In extreme cases, animals may develop flea allergy dermatitis. A veterinarian can help you decide upon flea remedies for your pet, but contact your local pest control expert to discuss science-based solutions and extermination options for your home.








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DOG & CAT TRACKS
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The most commonly found tracks can sometimes be confusing. How do you tell the difference between the tracks of dogs and cats? Was that track you found on the trail left by a mountain lion or a big dog? There are some clues that will help you tell the difference between dog and cat tracks. Dogs include such species as red and gray foxes, coyotes, wolves and domestic dogs. Cats include mountain lions, bobcats, lynx, and domestic cats. Lynx tracks have some unique features of their own, so are not treated here. What is said here should apply to bobcats, mountain lions and domestic cats. If you look closely, you can sometimes even tell the difference between right and left tracks, as well as front and hind tracks.

Front tracks are usually larger than hind tracks. This is true for both dogs and cats.

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The tracks of these two species are frequently confused because dogs are one of the only animals that make tracks of the same approximate size and shape as those of the cougar/mountain lion.

dog vs cat

What makes Dog track

A: The claw marks. Dogs usually show claw marks in their tracks. However, it is possible to see claw marks in cat tracks, but this is usually when the animal is running or pouncing.

B: The lack of a third lobe on the hind edge of the heel pad. See cat tracks below for the difference. Although it is visible in some dog tracks, the third lobe is located higher, not aligned with the other two as it is in cats.

C: The shape of the leading edge of the heel pad is a single lobe. See cat tracks for difference.

D: The alignment of the front two toes. They are side-by-side, or very close to it, in dogs tracks. There are exceptions, such as when the animal is making a turn or walking on a slope.

E: The almost triangular shape of the pads of the outer two toes. Take a look at the photo to see this more clearly as my drawing is not the best for indicating this feature.

F: Dogs have a little point where the heel pad turns. Cats share this feature.


dog vs cat

What makes Cat track

A: Note that the front two toes are not lined up side-by-side as the dog prints were. The toe that is further forward is analogous to a human middle finger (your longest finger). The alignment of this toe will tell you whether you have a left or right track. This toe is the inner toe of the leading pair.

B: The leading edge of the heel pad has two parts, or lobes.

C: The hind edge of the heel pad has three parts, or lobes. They are aligned with each other.

D: This is the front track. One clue that tells you this is that the edge of the heel pad is relatively straight. See hind track for difference.

E: Cats have a little point where the heel pad turns. Dogs share this feature.








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DOG & CAT RELATIONSHIP
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Dogs and cats have a range of interactions,with natural instincts of each species leading towards antagonistic interactions, while individual animals can have non-aggressive relationships with each other, particularly under conditions where humans have socialized non-aggressive behaviors.

The generally aggressive interactions between the species have been noted in cultural expressions.


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Range of relationships
The signals and behaviors that cats and dogs use to communicate are different and can lead to signals of aggression, fear, dominance, friendship or territoriality being misinterpreted by the other species. Dogs have a natural instinct to chase small prey that flee, an instinct common among cats. Most cats will flee from a dog, while others will take actions such as hissing, arching their backs and swiping at the dog. After being scratched by a cat, some dogs can become fearful of cats.

If appropriately socialized, cats and dogs may have relationships that are not antagonistic,and dogs raised with cats may prefer the presence of cats to other dogs.Even cats and dogs that have gotten along together in the same household may revert to aggressive reactions due to external stimuli, illness, or play that escalates.

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Cultural impact
The phrase "fight like cats and dogs" reflects a natural tendency for the relationship between the two species to be antagonistic. The phrase "to rain cats and dogs" comes from ancient beliefs that cats could make it rain and dogs controlled the wind. Other phrases and proverbs include "The cat is mighty dignified until the dog comes by" and "The cat and dog may kiss, but are none the better friends".

A Russian legend explains the antipathy between dogs and cats by stating that the devil has tricked the dog and cat into thinking the other has its rightful fur.

dog vs cat

Eugene Field's children's poem, "The Duel" , projects and amplifies the real life antipathy between cats and dogs on to a stuffed gingham dog and calico cat about whom the narrator has been told had an all-night fight during which they "ate each other up." In Fam Ekman's children's book Katten's Shrekk (The Cat's Terror), a cat visits a museum to find that all of the artworks, like Mona Lisa and Venus de Milo, have been replaced by parodies featuring dogs. The only piece not converted is The Scream which "symbolizes the cat's terror in the face of so many dogs."The American animated television series CatDog featured the adventures of the protagonist, CatDog, a genetically altered creature that had the head of a dog on one side of its body and the head of a cat on the other. The episodes frequently played on "cats and dogs being what they are" to incorporate "a lot of running and chasing".

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DOG vs CAT ART
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A Showdown at the Blanton Museum
Edward Hopper and his wife, Jo, spent their summers in South Truro, Massachusetts, on the tip of Cape Cod. Their neighbor was novelist John Dos Passos, whose wife bred Siamese cats. According to Francesca Consagra, a senior curator at the University of Texas at Austin's Blanton Museum of Art, one cat in particular, called Perkins, caught Hopper's eye. Perkins, named after editor Maxwell Perkins, became the subject of numerous sketches and studies by Hopper, which carefully depict the docile feline lounging around, stretching, and sleeping.

This Image (c) by Edward Hopper, Cat Study, 1941, conte crayon on paper. - THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON/THE ALVIN S. ROMANSKY PRINTS AND DRAWINGS ASSOCIATION ENDOWMENT FUND AND THE MARJORIE G. AND EVAN C. HONORING PRINT FUND.

Hopper is one in a long line of artists, dating back to the ancient Egyptians, who have been influenced artistically by their four-legged friends. An exhibition opening this summer at the Blanton explores this 33-century-long fascination through more than 150 cat and dog-inspired paintings, sculptures, drawings, and etchings. Titled "In the Company of Cats and Dogs," the show will feature works by such artists as Pablo Picasso, Vasily Kandinsky, William Wegman, Dieter Roth, Francisco de Goya, and Louise Bourgeois.

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Curated by Consagra and organized with the help of the university's Anthrozoology department, the show will delve into the ever-changing dynamic between humans and their cats and dogs. Consagra will divide the works into nine sections, each highlighting one of the various roles animals have played throughout history. These roles include hunters and herders, human protectors, symbols of morality in literature and art, religious and mythological beings, and, of course, pets.

This image (c) by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Poster for

Images of cats and dogs have long represented unsavory traits. Cats have been associated with witchcraft and lasciviousness, while small lap dogs can symbolize laziness or promiscuity. The small dog in Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec's 1895 Poster for "L'Artisan moderne," for example, adds to the risque tone of the scene. The work, which is an advertisement for designer André Marty's home furnishings, riffs on the idea of a doctor making a house call and features an artisan with his toolbox tending to the needs of a bed-ridden woman. The dog's wagging tail and suggestive position on the woman's lap intimate that the nature of the craftsman's visit is more for pleasure than it is for business.

This image (c) by Panel depicting Anubis from the sarcophagus of Menna, Egyptian, New Kingdom, Dynasty 19, circa 1295-1069 BC, limestone. SAN ANTONIO MUSEUM OF ART/GIFT OF GILBERT M. DENMAN JR., 91.80.166/PHOTOGRAPH BY PEGGY TENISON.

An ancient Egyptian panel from the sarcophagus of the scribe Menna will present viewers with one example of how people have ascribed sacred and mythical powers to animals. Etched in the panel is an image of Anubis, the jackal-headed god associated with mummification and passage into the afterlife. Depictions of Anubis often dressed the walls of burial sites, including the tomb of King Tut and the Temple of Ramses II.

This image (c) by John Sargent Noble, Otter Hunting (

The hunting portion of the show celebrates animals for their keen tracking abilities. In John Sargent Noble's idyllic 1881 canvas Otter Hunting ("On the Scent"), a team of hounds flocks to the scent of its assigned prey. Wet from the swim to their target, the dogs obediently dig to retrieve the otter for their hunting party.

This image (c) by Takahashi Hiroaki (Shotei), published by Fusui Gabo, Cat Prowling Around a Staked Tomato Plant, 1931, woodblock print. THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON/GIFT OF STEPHANIE HAMILTON IN MEMORY OF LESLIE A. HAMILTON.

Cats, or "biological mouse traps," as Consagra calls them, will also be represented in this section. In Takahashi Hiroaki's 1931 woodblock print Cat Prowling Around a Staked Tomato Plant, a wide-eyed cat stalks its prey. Ready to pounce, the black and white feline maneuvers through a tomato plant, protecting the crop from unwanted visitors.

Dog vs Cat Art

Otto Dix's 1968 Cat in Moon Landscape features a cat executing a similar task. Nimbly, the cat weaves its body through the long stems of a garden's pink and purple flowers. Its drawn claws and wide, glowing eyes indicate that it's on the prowl.

This image (c) by David Bates, The Whittler, 1983, oil on canvas. BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART/ MICHENER ACQUISITIONS FUND, 1983.123.

The final room of the show will be devoted to depictions of cats and dogs as domesticated companions. Among these works will be David Bates's soulful 1983 painting The Whittler. Executed in his trademark cartoonish style, the canvas features a smiling craftsman carving a piece of wood, while his faithful dog sits by his side.

Dog vs Cat Art

Hopper is one in a long line of artists dating back to the ancient Egyptians who have been influenced artistically by their four-legged friends. An exhibition opening this summer at the Blanton explores this 33-century-long fascination through more than 150 cat and dog-inspired paintings, sculptures, drawings, and etchings. Titled "In the Company of Cats and Dogs," the show will feature works by such artists as Pablo Picasso, Vasily Kandinsky, William Wegman, Dieter Roth, Francisco de Goya, and Louise Bourgeois.

Curated by Consagra and organized with the help of the university,s Anthrozoology department, the show will delve into the ever-changing dynamic between humans and their cats and dogs. Consagra will divide the works into nine sections, each highlighting one of the various roles animals have played throughout history. These roles include hunters and herders, human protectors, symbols of morality in literature and art, religious and mythological beings, and, of course, pet.

This Image (c) By Edward Hopper - Dog and cat Art, dog vs cat

Images of cats and dogs have long represented unsavory traits. Cats have been associated with witchcraft and lasciviousness, while small lap dogs can symbolize laziness or promiscuity. The small dog in Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec's 1895 Poster for "L'Artisan moderne," for example, adds to the risque tone of the scene. The work, which is an advertisement for designer Andre Marty's home furnishings, riffs on the idea of a doctor making a house call and features an artisan with his toolbox tending to the needs of a bed ridden woman. The dog's wagging tail and suggestive position on the woman's lap intimate that the nature of the craftsman's visit is more for pleasure than it is for business.

This Image (c) By Edward Hopper - Dog and cat Art, dog vs cat

An ancient Egyptian panel from the sarcophagus of the scribe Menna will present viewers with one example of how people have ascribed sacred and mythical powers to animals. Etched in the panel is an image of Anubis, the jackal-headed god associated with mummification and passage into the afterlife. Depictions of Anubis often dressed the walls of burial sites, including the tomb of King Tut and the Temple of Ramses II.

The hunting portion of the show celebrates animals for their keen tracking abilities. In John Sargent Noble's idyllic 1881 canvas Otter Hunting ("On the Scent"), a team of hounds flocks to the scent of its assigned prey. Wet from the swim to their target, the dogs obediently dig to retrieve the otter for their hunting party.

This Image (c) Takahashi Hiroaki (Shotei), published by Fusui Gabo,  - Dog and cat Art, dog vs cat

Cats, or "biological mouse traps," as Consagra calls them, will also be represented in this section. In Takahashi Hiroaki's 1931 woodblock print Cat Prowling Around a Staked Tomato Plant, a wide-eyed cat stalks its prey. Ready to pounce, the black and white feline maneuvers through a tomato plant, protecting the crop from unwanted visitors.

This Image (c) Otto Dix, Cat in Moon Landscape, 1968 - Dog and cat Art, dog vs cat

Otto Dix's 1968 Cat in Moon Landscape features a cat executing a similar task. Nimbly, the cat weaves its body through the long stems of a garden's pink and purple flowers. Its drawn claws and wide, glowing eyes indicate that it's on the prowl.

This Image (c) David Bates, The Whittler, 1983 - Dog and cat Art, dog vs cat

The final room of the show will be devoted to depictions of cats and dogs as domesticated companions. Among these works will be David Bates's soulful 1983 painting The Whittler. Executed in his trademark cartoonish style, the canvas features a smiling craftsman carving a piece of wood, while his faithful dog sits by his side.

This Image (c) Sandy Skoglund, Radioactive Cats, 1980 - Dog and cat Art, dog vs cat

Sandy Skoglund presents an alternate interpretation of pet ownership in her trippy photograph Radioactive Cats. The work depicts an army of futuristic, DayGlo-green cats taking over the sterile, dreary home of an elderly couple. Crawling over the furniture and appliances, the creatures migrate towards the refrigerator, on an apparent mission for food.








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Vision.Cats win this one. Both animals are predators, which means their visual acumen stresses movement over detail. Neither cats nor dogs are going to read the type on road signs, and their color vision isn't as strong as ours, but a quick movement will get noticed even if it's minor. But give the gold to the cats for their ability to see in far less light. When the mousies come out to play at dusk, the cats are ready for them. A twitch of a whisker or a tiny movement in the leaves can be seen in near-darkness.

Smell. Dogs even the score with their sense of smell. There's a reason why you don't see drug-sniffing cats, and it's not just because cats aren't exactly amenable to clocking in for a 9 to 5 shift at the police station. While cats have a better sense of smell than humans do, really, we're pretty worthless in the nose department. The canine sense of smell is nothing short of astonishing. Most dogs have a face that's really nothing but nose, and their ability to detect and distinguish odors is in the range of four times better than a cat's.

dog vs cat

Speed. Cats are natural sprinters, coiling and uncoiling their spines to blast off after prey or away from predators. For about the length of a suburban backyard, a cat can outrun and out jump a dog and can get over the fence before a dog can catch him. But that dash is going to take everything the cat has - he needs to rest after. Dogs such as Greyhounds can maintain speeds of 40 mph for a pretty good distance and can catch up to and pass a cat pretty quickly. Have to give this one to the dogs, by a nose.

dog vs cat

Endurance. Dogs are natural marathoners, and a fit dog such as a working sled dog can cover ground at a trot for hours. The only endurance sport a cat would win is napping, since the overwhelming majority of the feline day planner is filled with a single notation: "Zzzzzzzzzz." That's not a dig on cats, though: When they need to hunt for food they don't waste any time. They find, they kill, they eat and they nap.

Intelligence. Cat lovers can argue very effectively that cats are smart enough to get people to feed and care for them with little more than purring in return. Measured that way, it's hard to argue that dogs are smarter. But then you start listing all the jobs dogs have been trained to do, from smelling malignant tumors to taking down criminals, from finding and fetching birds to running an intricate agility course at top speed. And then there's the matter of language recognition: Many dogs know more than 100 words, and a few know almost twice that many. Cats? If they know more than the words you use to call them for dinner, they're not saying. Winner: dogs.


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Domestication
Dogs are domesticated, cats domesticated themselves. Through its social behaviour the dog is focused on its master and wants to serve him. The cat moved in with man. The many different breeds of dogs differ much more among themselves than breeds of cats. Cats are what they are, they do not change. Dogs respond to selection.

Dog and Wolf
The dog was domesticated from the (gray) wolf. It is likely that domestication took place approximately 15,000 to 30,000 years ago in East Asia, when man gave up his nomadic existence, settled and became a farmer. At that time wolves started to seek the proximity of man and to eat from the food they wasted. Wolves howl when an enemy approaches, so they also protected the farmers. They tamed the wolf and the wolf adapted to the farmers. During domestication, the facial skull became shorter. In ancient Egypt dogs were often used for hunting. Even species that we no longer know as domesticated nowadays, such as cheetahs and hyenas, were held by the Egyptians. Until 100 years ago dogs had to stay outside, where they slept in doghouses. Especially in the last 200 years an explosive multiplication of breeding varieties has taken place.

Dogs have retained the social characteristics of wolves. They have a social hierarchy, the pack, in which the place of each animal is fixed. Because of that, dogs listen to their masters. And dogs can learn a lot and adapt to many situations.


Cat and Wildcat
The cat was domesticated from the (African) wildcat. Domestication occurred in Asia Minor, about 10,000 years ago. Cats were probably attracted by mice, who did well on the grain of the newly settled farmers. The farmers took kittens as pets in their houses and took care of them. The cats got used to being fed by people and they domesticated themselves. During this process the cat became tamer, but did not change anatomically, nor its behaviour. Feral cats can easily survive in the wild.


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The Only Thing That Matters Is Love
By human standards, a dog is "better," but that doesn't really matter at all. We love our cats, and they love us, and it's a relationship that works well on both sides. The same is true of dogs, of course. And as a veterinarian, I don't really care which pet is "better" as long as I can help make them "better," as in keep each one healthy for a long life as a well-loved companion.


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dog vs cat

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dog vs cat

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DOG vs CAT
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CAT vs DOG on beach



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FIND A DOG BETWEEN 100 CATS
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FIND A DOG BETWEEN 100 CATS


FIND A CAT BETWEEN 100 DOGS
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FIND A DOG BETWEEN 100 CATS


FIND A CAT BETWEEN 100 DOGS
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