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DOG HABITS & BEHAVIOUR
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Dog habits
Dog and Puppy Common Habits Explained
Common Dog Behaviors Explained
Stop Dog's Quirky Behavior:
Licking, Eating Poop, Barking, Circling, Chewing, Begging
How to break Dog's Bad & Strange Habits
Dog's Obedience & Habits Training
Dog Behaviour Issues & Problems
Dog Behavior Training Tips
Dog Sleep Behaviours
Stop Dog Biting
Dog Training


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Dog habits
COMMON DOG HABITS
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Before you fly off the handle, one of the most important things to understand about correcting bad behavior is that punishment doesn't work. Many times, dogs don't understand what they're being punished for, and will respond by learning to hide the behavior. Remember, it is always important to discuss behavior issues with your veterinarian who can determine if they are caused by a medical problem.

Common Bad habits of Dogs

1. Urine Marking Inside the House



This is one of the most worthy bad behaviors. Dogs pee on things to mark territory or leave messages for canine friends, which is generally acceptable outdoors. If you catch your dog urine marking or even preparing to mark inside the house, quickly interrupt him with a "no" or an "oops" and take him outside. Then reward and praise him for choosing to urinate outdoors. To prevent frequent urination in the same household spot, remove the scent of previous urine marks with a good enzymatic cleaner.

Read more about Dog Submissive Urination Habit here


2. Barking at the Doorbell

Dog habits

Dogs bark at the doorbell for any number of reasons. They could be excited or anxious about visitors, or they might bark as a watchdog tendency. Some dogs even equate their barking with you opening the door, so they think they're training you to open the door when they bark. One of the best ways to stop barking at the doorbell is to teach and reward an alternative behavior, like sitting on a nearby mat and waiting for the door to be opened.

Read more about Dog Barking Habit here


3. Digging in the Yard

Dog habits

Digging is an extremely rewarding activity for dogs, whether they are digging to reach a scent or simply to release pent-up energy. Help your dog practice this behavior appropriately by giving him a sandbox or section of the yard where he's allowed to dig. Make sure this area has clearly marked visual boundaries, and use treats and toys to make this new digging place more exciting than the old one.

Read more about Dog Digging Habit here


4. Barking in the Car



Those shrill yaps from the backseat can be your dog expressing many emotions, from fear and frustration to exuberant joy. The best way to address barking in the car is to employ restraint equipment, like a harness or a crate to help your pet feel more secure. Other options include using a pheromone spray to help relax your dog, or giving him a chew toy to focus on during the car ride.

Read more about Dog Barking Habit here


5. Begging at the Table

Dog habits

No matter how cute or desperate for food your dog looks, consistency is the key to curbing dinner-table begging. Make sure no one in your family feeds the dog from the table. Even if his begging only works once in a blue moon, he'll repeat and escalate the behavior until all his barking and whining pays off with a rare food reward. Instead of giving in, provide your dog with an appropriate dinnertime activity, like enjoying his own toys or food puzzles.

Read more about Dog Begging Habit here


6. Chewing Inappropriate Objects

Dog habits

Chewing is a natural behavior for dogs, since they explore their environment with their mouth. It also relieves stress and boredom, and helps keep their teeth clean. When you catch your dog chewing inappropriate objects like shoes, as many dogs do, redirect the chewing to an appropriate item, like a chew toy or stuffed Kong. Then praise your pup for selecting an acceptable outlet for his chewing behavior. Talk with your veterinarian about which chews are safe for your dog.

Read more about Dog Chewing Habit here


7. Stealing Food Off Counters

Dog habits

It's one of the more difficult habits to break, since Fido experiences a huge reward for stealing the food: He gets to eat it! The easiest way to solve this problem is to eliminate the opportunity. Don't leave food around, and use baby gates or fencing to restrict your dog's access to the kitchen when you are not there to supervise him. Teaching the "leave it" command is useful for when you catch him in the act of stealing snacks.

Read more about Dog Stealing Food Habit here


8. Raiding the Trash

Dog habits

Simply, put a lid on it! Dogs are natural scavengers. If your dog's destiny had taken a different turn, he'd be out there in the big world fending for himself, so dogs are built with a natural tendency to forage and search for good stuff. So get a trash can with a secure cover, and keep the trash can closed. For more tantalizing tidbits, use your sink's garbage disposal to get rid of temptation, or bag it and carry it out to the big bin to avoid all temptation. Give your dog other activities that satisfy his urge to forage. You can do this by throwing a handful of kibble out on the back lawn for him to find, or getting a treat dispensing toy you can fill with kibble. Most dogs will ultimately find these activities more rewarding that tipping over the trash.

Read more about Dog Trash Eating Habit here


9. Scratching Doors

Dog habits

Dogs do what works for them! If the dog learns he can get your attention by scratching on the door, then that behavior will continue. For many unwanted behaviors, simply ignoring the behavior until it extinguishes is the answer, but this wouldn't be a good time for that strategy (unless you want a hole scratched in your door!). The first step would be to try to understand why your dog is scratching on the door, and take measures to address that. Is the dog getting outdoors for potty breaks frequently enough? Is the dog left outside alone too long? Think about re-arranging things so the condition that's causing the scratching is reduced or eliminated. Once you know what the situation is and have taken steps to alleviate it, you may still have some scratching going on, old habits are hard to break! You can discourage further scratching by temporarily modifying the environment to make scratching less attractive. For instance, attaching some double-side sticky tape on the door usually is effective, the dogs seem to dislike the feeling of the sticky stuff on their paws. Or get some carpet runner from your local home improvement store - the kind that comes in long plastic sheets, smooth on one side and with pointy little bumps on the other side. Attach that to the door where the dog scratches, pointy-side up. The dog won't care for the feel of the bumps on his paws, and usually quit. Installing a plexiglass panel can also discourage scratching, if the dog's toenails don't have anything to catch onto, scratching becomes less interesting and knowing your door's not being destroyed can help you ignore the behavior until it goes away on its own.

Read more about Dog Scratching The Door Habit here


10. Jumping on People

Dog habits

Discourage going vertical by heavily reinforcing sit and down. Jumping up on people is a self-reinforcing behavior - that means it feels good enough just doing it to justify continuing to do it. Dogs jump up to get some face time with people they want to greet, this is similar to the greeting style of many dogs with other dogs, but doesnâ't make it in the realm of human etiquette. But if you teach the dog it feels just as good or better to sit when approaching a human, that new behavior will quickly replace the old one. NEVER push a dog off you - this makes jumping up worse! OR knee the dog, it's not effective and someone's going to get hurt. And hollering as the dog will only add to the excitement level and probably make the jumping more vigorous.

Read more about Dog Jumping Habit here


11. Jumping on Furniture

Dog habits

Again, heavily reinforce sits and downs. If you have a problem with the dog jumping on the furniture while you're sitting on it, have your dog wear a leash or drag line indoors until you can get the behavior under control. If the dog jumps up on the sofa while you are there, grab the dog's leash (not his collar!) and gently guide (not yank!) him to the floor while saying not hollering Off!. If the dog tries again, repeat the exercise. If the dog tries again, just guide him back to the floor, say Off! and put your foot on his leash so that he's not able to climb back up. While he's on the floor, reinforce the sits and downs, and before long, the attempts to jump up will cease.
If the dog jumps on the furniture while you are not around, make it impossible for him to do so by placing empty cardboard boxes on the sofa and chairs so that there's no room for him to get up. If you size your boxes properly, you can nest them one inside the other for storage while you are not using them. Or you can get some more carpet runner and lay that bumpy side up on the chairs and sofa cushions. I haven't found a dog yet who wanted to take a nap on that stuff. Once your dog has gotten out of the habit of jumping on the furniture (usually 3-4) weeks, you can put the carpet runner away for another day.

Read more about Dog Scratching The Door Habit here


12. Eating Poop

Dog habits

Some dogs eat their own poop, or the poop of other dogs (or both!). First, make sure Fido is properly nourished. Some professionals believe that dogs eat stool to recoup nutrients they are not getting from their regular diets. Second, focus on prevention. If possible, separate the elimination area from the play area. Let Fido access the elimination area for that purpose only. When it's play time, keep him out. If that's not possible, pick up poop as soon as it happens. Finally, keep baby diapers and soiled baby clothes out of reach. If prevention doesn't work, the next best option is to distract your dog before he has a chance to eat stool. Obviously, this requires close supervision. As soon as you see Fido sniffing poop, command him to leave it or call him to come to you.

There can be lots of reasons for FIDO, for eating poop, including:

A nutritional deficit. You can have your dog checked by a vet to determine if this is a problem.

Cheap-o dog food. Many brands of inexpensive dog food have ingredients the dogs will eat readily, but can't digest. So the dog poop comes out full of interesting food stuff your dog is happy to eat again. Get a better brand of dog food!

Over-feeding. Dogs feed too much at each meal will pass stools containing a larger proportion of undigested nutrients then dogs who are fed appropriate amounts for their size. Quit overfeeding.

Feeding too infrequently. Dogs should get their daily ration served up twice a day to optimize the digestive process and get the most nutrition from each meal. Dogs fed once a day may pass stools with lots of undigested nutrients that they'll happily consume for their own second meal.

Boredom! Remember, dogs that are bored and/or under-exercised will figure out lots of activities on their own to stay busy with, and they're almost never anything you'd choose! Poop-eating can be one of them. Always make sure the yard or area where your dog is confined is clean and droppings are picked up as soon as possible. Make sure your dog gets plenty of exercise, and has lots of things to do to help stave off boredom.

Read more about Dog Eating Poop Habit here


13. Anxiety (separation or fear)



A dog may develop separation anxiety if there is a change in the owner's work schedule or change of environment. Anxiety often increases the longer the owner is gone and may result in behaviours such as whining, pacing, salivating, excessive licking, barking, howling, hyperactivity, scratching, chewing, digging, urinating or defecating and destruction of property. Dogs with separation anxiety also have an overly excited response when the owner returns home, even if they have only been gone a short while. Scolding or punishing the dog leads to more confusion, more anxiety and worse behaviour. Noise phobia (i.e fear of thunderstorms) is also common in dogs. Do not comfort your pet - this may be interpreted as reward for his fearful response. Punishment will only cause more anxiety. Ask your veterinarian to suggest behaviour modification techniques or refer you to a behavioural specialist or trainer. Dog appeasing pheromones are also an innovative way, used along with other behaviour modification practices, to control and manage unwanted canine behaviour associated with fear and stress in adult dogs and puppies.

Read more about Dog Separation Anxiety Habit here


14. Aggression

Dog habits

If your dog exhibits dangerous behaviour toward any person, particularly toward children, seek professional help from your veterinarian, an animal behaviourist or qualified dog trainer. Aggressive behaviour toward other animals is also a reason to seek professional help. The key preventative measures you can take early in your dog's life are: adequate socialization in varied situations with people and other dogs, consistent and proper training, spaying or neutering (spayed or neutered dogs are three times less likely to bite than intact dogs), teaching appropriate behaviour - avoid playing aggressive games with your dog such as wrestling, tug of war, or siccing your dog on another person. Don't allow puppies to chew your hands. Set limits!

Read more about Dog Agressive Habit here


15. Bite Children

Dog habits

The possible reasons of dog's agressive children biting:

The dog is protecting a possession, food or water dish or puppies.

The dog is protecting a resting place.

The dog is protecting its owner or the owner's property.

The child has done something to provoke or frighten the dog (e.g., hugging the dog, moving into the dog's space, leaning or stepping over the dog, trying to take something from the dog).

The dog is old and grumpy and having a bad day and has no patience for the actions of a child.
The dog is injured.
The child has hurt or startled it by stepping on it, poking it or pulling its fur, tail or ears.

The dog has not learned bite inhibition and bites hard by accident when the child offers food or a toy to the dog.

The child and dog are engaging in rough play and the dog gets overly excited.

The dog views the child as a prey item because the child is running and/or screaming near the dog or riding a bicycle or otherwise moving past the dog.

Read more about Dog Agressive Habit here


16. Sniffing Each Other's Butts

Dog habits

We've all seen our dogs immediately run to the rear end of a new dog they've just met. The common myth is that they are adjust saying hello but this disgusting dog habit has a much deeper meaning. Dogs have two glands inside their anus which emit a strong scent. Dogs sniff each other to get a whiff of that scent, which carries vital information about it's host the dog's sex, health status and temperament. So, if your pup immediately decides he doesn't like a dog, it probably means he didn't pass the sniff test! The nose knows best!

Read more about Dog Agressive Habit here


17. Humping your Leg

Dog habits

Often accompanied by giggling, pointing and sheer embarrassment is the disgusting act of a dog humping your leg. Contrary to popular belief, your dog's humping is not usually sexual in nature. If that were true, the humping would stop when a dog is neutered and no female dogs would partake in the activity! Humping is all about dominance - a dog establishing rank over other dogs. Or you. Most of us have had the unfortunate luck to be in the presence of an enthusiastic leg humper. So, how do you stop this behavior? Training. The more you train your pup to sit, shake or stay, the more respectful he,ll be of your position in the pack and the less likely he'll feel the need to establish his dominance on your leg. So, next time your beloved dog partakes in some disgusting habits, just remind yourself there,s probably a completely logical explanation for his behavior. Remember, they have their reasons. Weird, disgusting reasons!

Read more about Dog HUMPING LEG Habit here


18. Licking

Dog habits

Licking is a dominant behaviour. Allowing your dog to lick you is like rolling over and exposing your vulnerable belly. Dogs that are insecure of their position in the pack, or just generally unstable, will lick to claim power they don't have. When this behaviour is ignored it can manifest into quite an obsession. It's the human's job to be clear with boundaries and stop the licking by making a loud short sharp noise to redirect the licker's focus. When the dog looks up, ask him to go "back". Take a step forward to force him to step back. As soon as he repositions all four paws say "back" again to reinforce. Be consistent, clear and kind and lick lunacy will soon be over. A dog should not be allowed to over-groom themselves with constant licking either. If there is a rash have it checked out before it leads to an infection.

Read more about Dog Licking Habit here


19. Refusing to Eat

Dog habits

There are numerous reasons a dog might refuse to eat. For example, getting a large number of treats during the day, sickness or changing to a new food can result in a dog not eating. If the food is changed to something the dog does not like, change back to the original food or use the original food and gradually change to the new food by adding small amounts of the new food to the older food until the dog does not refuse the new food. If the dog does not eat due to receiving treats, cut back on the treats throughout the day. When there is no logical reason for the appetite loss, take the dog to the veterinarian for a health check.


20. Food guarding

Dog Bad habits

This is a common problem since dogs do tend to protect their food. This behavior is based on the same instinct that drove their ancestors into protecting their food in order to survive in the wild. Although common this behavior must be corrected, especially if the owner has small children who may try to make contact with the dog while he's eating.

Do not ever hit the dog or take his food away when he's acting territorial since this will only confirm to him the need to guard his food. An effective way to break this habit is by teaching him how to behave in the case of the small treats you are usually giving him as a form of praise. Whenever you offer him a treat encourage him to take it by voicing a command and if the dog snaps too hard at the treat, voice a stopping command in a harsh tone and try to delay the food until the dog is ready to take it gently. Don't forget to praise him when he does this. Practicing this sort of behavior will make the dog learn that his owner has the right to control the small treats he's being offered. In time, this method can be expanded to his regular food bowl.

Read more about Dog Food Guarding Habit here


21. Housebreaking

Dog habits

Let's face it: nobody wants you to bring your dog to their office party if he isn't house trained. There are five secrets to housebreaking your dog in a hurry:

1. Administer a leash and collar correction when he has an accident.

2. Praise him when he eliminates outside

3. Establish a Go Potty! command and place

4. Clean up any accidents with an enzymatic neutralizer, like Nature's Miracle which you can buy at most pet stores

5. Keep your dog in a crate or kennel run when you cannot supervise him, 100% of the time so that you are consistent.

Read more about Dog Housebreaking Habit here


22. Running Away

Dog habits

Keep your dog on a 20 - 30 foot long line every time you take him outside. When you call him, make him come. If he runs away, step on the line, and then go to him and correct him. Then walk back to where you originally called him and make him come. There is a technique to this so that you don't make your dog leash smart, which I go into more detail about, in my book. But in a nutshell: You are playing a mind-game with your dog. When he's given up on the idea that he can run away from you are substitute the long line with the tab - 1 foot leash. The dog's lack of higher logic and reason will prevent him from knowing the difference, if you do it right.

Read more about Dog Running Away Habit here


23. Running After Cars

Bad Dog habits

There might be two reasons for your puppy chasing cars. Either it is safeguarding its territory or it simply hates cars. To control this behavior, keep your puppy in a safe yard where it cannot see the street. While taking your puppy for a walk, put it on a leash. If it starts to trail a car, yank on the leash firmly. When it shows restraint, pat it. One way to prevent this behavior is exercising your puppy regularly. This releases the pent-up energy in your puppy. An exhausted dog may not be interested in chasing cars.

Read more about Dog Running After Cars Habit here


24. TV

Dog Bad habits

Your dog may find the constant light and motion on your TV addictive. While there might not be any significant risks to your dog's health, you still need to prevent your dog from falling off a chair or table if she tries to paw the TV screen. You can ask your vet to help you find a dog behaviorist or trainer to help curb your dog's addiction to TV.


26. Pacing & Circling

Dog Bad habits

We have all seen it and have all wondered why it happens. That moment when your dog walks over to its favorite spot and spins circles before sitting or laying down. Some dogs spin once or twice, and some dogs have been known to spin dozens of times, but we all wonder the same thing. Why? Well, there are no definitive answers, but there is a somewhat logical reason. Some theories point to the idea that if a dog was doing this in the wild, its circles would be clearing up the area of debris that it was about to lay down in. Sort of like a nesting habit. They say the behavior is so hard wired into the dogs subconscious, that it has yet to be bred out. What we need to understand is, if this move helped keep dogs alive when they were wild, then it makes sense that it is an instinct that still exists in them, even in their domesticated state. So the next time you see your dog spinning circles, remember: that just shows you he was once a wild beast, living among the land.

Read more about Dog Pacing & Circling Habit here


27. Sleeping

Dog habits

It's important to understand your dog's sleeping habits and how they influence its behavior, particularly when your dog gets disturbed. You see, Dogs will usually sleep for around 13 hours every day. Although this can vary between different breeds, this still means your dog is going to be asleep for almost half it's life!

Read more about Dog Sleeping Habit here
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29. Running away when called

Dog Bad habits

There are few things more frustrating than having your dog loose in the front yard, calling him to come, and having him run in the opposite direction. There are so many things to worry about: getting hit by a car, scaring a neighbor, etc. So what are you doing to encourage your dog to come when called instead of running from you? It's actually pretty simple. You call Fido, and Fido ignores you. You chase him, and he runs faster. Finally, you decide to go home and get a treat. You show your dog the treat, and he comes running. Then, you hide the treat and scold him. What have you just taught him? That coming when you call is a really, really bad idea. Instead, try teaching your dog before he's experienced freedom that coming when you call is the best thing that could ever happen to him. Start in a safe environment with a treat in your hand, but make sure he's doing something he finds really interesting, like chewing on his favorite toy. Show him the treat, and call him by name. When he comes, give him the treat, and make a huge fuss over him. The goal is to make him think that coming to you is far better than freedom. Practice this over and over until he doesn't hesitate for a second when you call him.

Read more about Dog Running Away Habit here


30. Pulling

Dog Bad habits

If you have ever let Fido pull you down the street by the leash, you have taught him that it's his job to walk you rather than the other way around. The problem is obvious if Fido is a large breed. If he is a tempest in a teacup, his pulling may look cute. But you're still allowing him to think that he's the boss. Whether he wants to chase a squirrel, terrorize the neighbor's cat, or sniff a mailbox, he thinks his agenda takes priority. It's your job to teach him otherwise. As with most things canine, it's more effective to reward the positive than it is to punish the negative. When Fido starts pulling, stop in your tracks. Don't look at him, don't talk to him, don't do anything until he has turned toward you and is giving you his full attention. Once that happens, start walking. If possible, lead him to where he wanted to go; just make sure that you're the one determining the course. If he wanted to go somewhere or do something inappropriate, just start walking again. The most important thing to remember is that the walk should get very, very boring as soon as Fido pulls. The fun only starts back up when he stops pulling and gives you his attention.

Read more about Dog Pulling Away Habit here


31. Rolling in "Scented" Treasure/Trash/Poop

Dog Bad habits

A left over habit from the dogs' ancestor is the art of rolling in something not so nice. Fox poo is a great example of this but dogs are rarely fussy. If it smells they roll in it and do so with gusto. You know the signs, a small black, tar-like, smear on the ground leads to a swift head dip. The word "no" is barely from your lips before the dog's neck is smeared and the hound is trotting around proudly spreading their whiff like it's an expensive perfumed oil. The dog owner with a "regular rolling" canine eventually develops an art to deal with the habit. The infrequent or opportunist roller always catches their person unaware. How many times have you hopefully hosed a hound with a bottle of water yet still smelled the stink all the way home in the car?

Read more about Dog Rolling in Scents/Poop/Trash Habit here


34. Human Agression

Dog Bad habits

Sometimes a dog becomes aggressive towards the owner or other people and Austin says this is mainly because the owner doesn't show enough leadership in the relationship. If a dog is aggressive towards his owner, nine times out of 10 the owner of the dog is weak and the dog says you are not my leader, I feel insecure around you, I have to take the leadership role. A leader doesn't hurt the dog, doesn't scream at the dog and doesn't hit the dog!. The leader is a person who the dog feels very safe and secure around so when the dog has a strong leader, he is very rarely aggressive. I see this with many young girls 19 to 20-year-olds, who get these Malamute puppies fluffy, cute and they grow up and take over. If you feel you are in a dangerous situation and you are worried about your safety, you can train your dog to accept you as leader,

Put a bowl in front of your dog.

You put a tiny bit of food in the bowl and you say you may eat and allow your dog to eat.

If your dog is aggressive towards other people, have the person put the food in the bowl and give your dog permission to eat. You must have your dog on a lead when other people come to feed.

This action says to the dog that people coming to him are good and the owner telling him when to eat elevates the owner.

Don't let him eat, get in the car or cross the road until hes told. Elevate yourself.

Read more about Dog Human Agression Habit here


35. Marking Territory

Dog Bad habits

It's natural for a dog to mark territory, but they can take it too far, especially if they're under stress. With help from you in regulating their world and teaching them appropriate behavior, a dog can be trained to mark territory only where appropriate. As with guarding their food, marking territory is behavior that is ingrained in all dogs. While you can't train to teach your dog to sit at the table with a knife and fork, you can teach him to control this habit. This section will give you the advice you need.

Read more about Dog Marking Territory Habit here


36. Dog Biting

Dog Bad habits

Owning a dog that bites can be a serious issue. You need to be honest about how far your dog's particular behavior problem has progressed before you can deal with it properly. There are lots of reasons why a dog will bite and there are several levels of biting, from a puppy that nips at your hands to an adult dog that snaps under stress and actually breaks the skin. Your own solution to stop dog biting will depend on your dog's age, why he bites, and how extreme the biting is. Biting generally occurs when your dog is put in situations he finds stressful. The more stressors he's exposed to at one time, the more likely he is to bite.

Read more about Dog Biting Habit here


37. Excessive Shyness

Dog Bad habits

A puppy that's not encouraged to build self-confidence can become an overly shy dog. It's during a puppy's socialization period that his confidence is instilled. Some breeds tend to be more timid than others, however, shyness can become a serious behavior problem with any dog that's not properly socialized. Shy dogs tend to be afraid of everything from people and strange objects to loud noises. You can't force a dog to be brave; you can only encourage him through praise and leadership.

Read more about Shy Dog Habit here


38. Whining for Attention

Dog Bad habits

Does your dog whine? If you pet her, look at her, or do anything except ignore her, you teach her that whining works. To stop it, turn your back when she whines, fold your arms and look away, or leave the room. Pet and play with her when she's not whining.


39. Crotch-Sniffing

Dog Bad habits

Dogs like to sniff each other's bottoms, but it's different when they nose up to someone's crotch! It's not bad manners, according to your dog. Dogs can get a lot of information about other dogs by sniffing around down there. They probably get the same info by sniffing people, too. If your dog's nosiness bothers you or the people they sniff! Obedience training may help.

Read more about Sniffing Crotch Dog Habit here


40. Scooting

Dog Bad habits

It's common for dogs to scoot or drag their bottoms across the ground after doing their business, especially if their stool is loose. But if a dog scoots a lot all day, see your vet. Scooting can mean impacted anal glands, which you should get your vet to treat.


41. Eating Grass

Dog Bad habits

Your lawn may not look yummy to you, but your dog has other ideas. Dogs aren't just meat eaters. Sometimes they like a little greenery, too. Eating grass, sticks, and even dirt is normal. As long as they don't do it a lot. If your dog binges on grass, it could mean stomach problems. If your dog eats a lot of dirt, it could be a medical problem, like anemia. Call your vet to check.

Read more about Dog Eating Grass Habit here


42. Drooling

Dog Bad habits

If your dog salivates when you're grilling steaks, that's normal. But drooling too much, or for no good reason, could be a sign of a health problem. If your dog drools a lot and starts having behavioral problems, such as chewing or hiding, it also could be a sign of anxiety. Consult your vet.


43. Herding

Dog Bad habits

Some dogs will try to herd anything: cats, ducks, even kids. They were bred to herd. They naturally want to move things around or collect things because it's what their genes are telling them to do. Even though herding can be normal, it still can be a problem. With training, dogs can learn to herd only when you want them to.


44. Paw Licking

Dog Bad habits

Dogs lick their paws to groom themselves. That's normal, as long as they don't overdo it. When dogs lick their paws too much, it's often because of an infection or skin allergy. Sometimes, it's a habit. Talk to your vet to find out the cause and how to treat it.

Read more about Dog Eating Paw Habit here


45. Dreaming

Dog Bad habits

Your dog is curled up in bed, eyes shut and paws twitching. Every now and then, he whines. He's probably dreaming. If you could see a dog's brainwaves during sleep, they seem to have REM cycles. REM or rapid eye movement is the stage of sleep when people usually dream. So what do dogs dream about? That's one secret our four-legged friends get to keep.


46. Panting

Dog Bad habits

Because dogs sweat through the pads on their feet, most of their body heat is expelled through their mouth when they pant. It's their primary means of regulating body temperature. Dogs also pant to cope with pain.


47. Chasing Birds

Dog Bad habits

Another wonderful gift from their predator ancestors, dogs have a natural instinct to chase birds. They have even evolved to chasing balls, sticks, Frisbees and more!


48. Exsessive Shaking

Dog Bad habits

Does your Fido shake his leg when you scratch that special spot? This is due to a natural instinct referred to as the "scratch reflex." Meant to warn the pup to get rid of the scratch, it is a bit pointless when he's enjoying your rub-down.

Read more about Dog Shaking Habit here


49. Fire Hydrants Love

Dog Bad habits

The dog and the love of fire hydrants is pure myth. The behavior is more of an innocent need to urinate. It's in a male dog's nature to lift his leg and pee, and a fire hydrant is the perfect height! However, when a dog sniffs and then urinates on a fire hydrant, most likely another dog has done it before him.


50. Fear of Thunderstorm

Dog Bad habits

I have listed this problem here, not because it is a behavioral problem in the classical sense, but it is a real problem to the dog and something that the owner can do something about. Called a Thunderstorm Phobia or simply Storm Phobia, this condition occurs when a dog is overly frightened of one or more aspects of the storm causing him to display physical, psychological, and behavioral signs.

Read more about Dog Shaking Habit here


51. YOU

Dog Bad habits

Yes, your dog may be hooked on you which can lead to separation anxiety and loneliness. You may want to make sure that your dog has some quiet time alone and also socializes with other people and dogs so your dog doesn't get addicted to you and become depressed when you aren't home.








Dog habits
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Dog habits
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Aggression Issues
Aggression in Dogs
Breaking Up a Dogfight
Mounting and Masturbation
Mouthing, Nipping and Play Biting
in Adult Dogs
Predatory Behavior in Dogs

Behavior Issues
Behavior Problems in Older Dogs
Behavioral Medications for Dogs
Charging Through Doors
Compulsive Behavior in Dogs
Destructive Chewing
Digging
Escaping from the Yard
Puppy Mouthing
Socializing Your Puppy
Teaching Your Dog Not to Jump Up
on People

The Vocal Dog
Barking
Howling
Whining

Chasing Issues
Dogs Chasing Bicycles, Skateboards
and Other Moving Things
Dogs Chasing Cars
Dogs Chasing Cats
Dogs Chasing Children
Dogs Chasing Runners
Dogs Chasing Wildlife

Eating Issues
Begging at the Table
Coprophagia (Eating Feces)
Counter Surfing and Garbage Raiding
Food Guarding
Foods That Are Hazardous to Dogs
Pica (Eating Things That Aren't Food)
Using Taste Deterrents

Fearful Dogs
Dogs Who Are Hand Shy
Dogs Who Are Sensitive to Handling
Fear of Children
Fear of Nail Trimming
Fear of Noises
Fear of Objects
Fear of Other Animals
Fear of People
Fear of Riding in Cars
Fear of Specific Places
Fear of the Veterinary Clinic
Neophobia (Fear of New Things)
Separation Anxiety

House Training
House Training Your Adult Dog
House Training Your Puppy
House Training Your Puppy Mill Dog
Medical Causes of House Soiling in Dogs
Teaching Your Dog to Eliminate in a
Specific Place
Submissive Urination
Teaching Your House Trained Dog to
Ask to Go Out
Urine Marking in Dogs









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Dog habits








Dog habits
TEACH YOUR DOG
GOOD HABITS
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Even though we love our pets, their behavior sometimes needs improvement. It's never their objective to annoy; it's just that they haven't yet learned (or have forgotten) the proper way to act. If you believe your pet could benefit from etiquette lessons, know that it's not difficult to teach a dog or cat to behave better. To make the most of your relationship with your pet, teach good habits using:

Practice Once you decide on a behavior to focus on, give your pet plenty of opportunities to practice it. Try it at different times of day, in different situations, even in different locations around the house.

Praise Animals love to be adored and told how good they are. When yours masters a new habit, praise him or her in an enthusiastic voice. Use the pet's name and say how wonderful they are. Pat them on the head or scratch your pupil behind the ears as you praise.

Rewards Who doesn't like a cookie - even if it's in the form of a dried fish morsel, for a cat? Accompany your praise with a treat. Even a small piece communicates how proud you are.


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Important Habits to Learn
ComeThe best time to teach a cat is before mealtime. Call her name right before you reach for the kibble or can opener. With repetition, she will start to believe that hearing her name means to make a beeline for you. Away from the kitchen, call her name and have a reward like a sliver of tuna or chicken. Repeat. Similarly, with a dog you can use food and practice, praise and reward.

Go - When placed in a clean litter box, most cats figure out what to do. With a kitten, gently take her paw and use it to scrape the litter. If instinct doesn't take over, keep her in a confined space with the box until she uses it. Clean and repeat. With dogs, it's all about timing and crate training helps, too. And remember to praise and reward good behavior with enthusiasm.

Be a Good Traveler - Whether you need to take your pet to the veterinarian down the street, or on a trip around the world, good behavior can make travel less stressful for everyone. To keep your pet and others safe, make sure that you have an appropriate restraint or carrier for your pet. Make test runs to get your pet accustomed to leaving the house. On a trip, allow time to stop and provide water and a bathroom break.

Leave It - Pets are naturally curious, and dogs in particular are scavengers. To convince yours to give up something he finds that's toxic or potentially dangerous, teach him that the "Leave it" command is always followed by a tastier reward.

Don't Pull - Walking even a small dog can pull you off balance, so it's important to control your pet rather than the other way around. With the dog on your left, walk quickly, talking to the dog as you go. Stop, treat, and go and make every walk a training session until your dog consistently keeps pace with you.

Getting daily exercise - Your dog adores getting outside for a nice long stroll, and so should you. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (like brisk walking) every week for adults ages 18 to 64, and for adults 65 plus with no limiting health conditions. "If you can walk two miles in 30 minutes, that's a pretty good pace," says Raul Seballos, vice chair of preventive medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. The best way to mimic your pup? Bring her with you when you walk. That's because dog walkers are 34 percent more likely to meet federal benchmarks for physical activity, a recent study found. If you'd rather swim, bike, or hit the gym, go for it, Just do something you enjoy.

Having meals reliably prepared and served. - When you feed your dog, you serve him using his special bowl, the same amount, every day. When you dine, you should control your own portions, too. "The last thing you want to do is put big serving dishes out,". That's because you'll likely keep eating (and overeating) from the dishes on the table just because they're there. A better solution? "Be aware of what you're eating and plan in advance,"









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Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons
DOG SLEEP BEHAVIORS
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So, you got a new four-legged family member and you have noticed some weird things going on while your new canine friend is sleeping. Do not be alarmed. Although these things can be an indicator that your dog is in pain or is having some other health issues in some situations, be assured that the probability is that everything is okay. Normal to the experienced dog owners and dogs themselves unaware of the situation, some things your dog does while sleeping are just downright strange.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Why Does My Dog Walk in a Circle Before Lying Down?
Your dog's ancestors slept in the wild and probably trampled down a "nest" of grass, leaves, or snow to sleep in. When your dog circles before lying down, he's displaying this ancestral tendency, which is basically a way to get comfortable and feel safe. Your dog may also dig or scratch at your couch or carpet prior to lying down. This, too, is an ancestral behavior, as wild dogs dig holes to lie in. The hole help keeps dogs cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Most dogs only circle a few times before getting comfortable. If your dog seems to circle endlessly and has trouble settling down, this could be a sign of arthritis or a neurological problem and should be checked out by a veterinarian.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Shiver
However it may sound strange, brainwave patterns of sleeping dogs and people are pretty much the same. Dogs pass through the same series of sleep cycles as humans. They also have vivid dreams occurring during the REM (rapid eye movement) stage, which, according to some experts, may vary from the size of your pet. Allegedly, the frequency of REM cycles occur depends upon the size of your dog: small dogs may have dreams every 10 minutes but large dogs have fewer dreams that last longer. This is when your dog's legs start twitching and his eyes darting around behind closed lids. Relax, everything's fine. All mammals dream and when they enter REM sleep, a section of the brain stem kicks in to partially paralyze their muscles. Thankfully, this prevents them from physically acting out their dreams. Shivering is no cause for alarm.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Cry
Crying also occurs during the REM sleep, the deepest stage of sleep. However this stage may be deep, it's the one in which you pet becomes active. It's important to remember not to wake your dog up when they cry in their sleep, no matter how tempting it may be or how worried and sad you may be.

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REM sleep is an indication of healthy brain growth, and it will occur less and less as your pup grows older. Nightmares are a beneficial thing actually, because they serve to help us avoid dangerous situations during the day and help us get rid of our fears, at least partially. Dogs are no strangers to this.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Whimper
Scientists have found that, just like people, dogs actually dream while they sleep. Not all animals dream, but dogs are definitely one of those which do. Scientists discovered that when asleep, dogs have nearly the exact same brain waves as sleeping people do, with the same areas of the brain lighting up. This explains why dogs are vocal while they sleep. Like humans, they are simply expressing some small outward reaction to the dream their mind has thought up for them.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Bark
This one may be the most annoying one for the dog owner. Your beloved pet is just dreaming, and sure, it may be a bad dream but it also may be a good one. Not all barks are bad. Remember that that's the way canines communicate, among other ways. Sure, your pup may be dreaming about defending from a vicious predator but it also may be dreaming of nice things like play time with other dogs, chasing birds and greeting you at the mere glimpse of your silhouette down the street. Like in most cases, just let your dog dream, the barking although annoying will stop shortly.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Crawl Under The Covers
Whether or not your dog at bedtime may just be a matter of preference. Animal behaviorist Dr. Brenda Forsythe says experts theories for this behavior range from a dog's need to feel companionship while sleeping with a human "pack member" to an evolutionary behavior from when wild dogs raised their puppies in small, dark dens. Crawling under the covers may actually be more common in breeds that were bred to burrow, like.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Curl Up
Many dogs curl up like a caterpillar when they sleep, even when they've got plenty of room to stretch out. It might seem uncomfortable, but it's a cozy, secure position for dogs, sort of like the "fetal position" for humans. In the wild, dogs dig a nest and curl up in a ball for warmth to sleep. This not only conserves body heat, it also protects the bulk of their organs from predators. Many dogs particularly enjoy having a blanket to "dig" in and curl up on (or under). If your dog often sleeps stretched out, it means he's either hot or very secure in his surroundings.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Twitch
During sleep, dogs go through three stages: NREM (non-rapid eye movement), REM (rapid eye movement) and SWS (short-wave sleep). Like in the SWS stage of sleep, when dogs breathe heavily, the REM stage also has particular movements to it. In this stage your four-legged friends act on their dreams by twitching or moving all four paws. Dogs that stretch out when they sleep are more relaxed than those who sleep all curled up, so they are more prone to twitching in their sleep. Twitching in their sleep can be funny and cute to the owner, but also stressful if the owner doesn't know what's going on. Your lovely family member is probably dreaming of running freely and having fun, so there's no need for worry. It has been noticed that young puppies and senior dogs tend to move more in their sleep and to dream more than adult dogs, for reasons yet unknown.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Growl
This occurrence is not as annoying as barking, because it's not as loud, but it's not the most pleasant of all "dog dreams" side effects. Dogs mostly dream about their favorite activities. Although most people understandably associate a growling dog with an aggressive dog, this doesn't have to be the case. Sure, growling can be an "unmistakable warning sign" that tells other beings to “back off," but canine specimens can also growl when they're frightened or defensive and they also often engage in play and growling. Do not be afraid that your pooch has an alter-ego developing in their sleep. Everything's OK.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Shake
Shaking takes a bit more serious note. There are many possible reasons of your beloved canine shaking in their sleep. These reasons can range from completely normal dream state to a serious, life threatening condition. If you think that your pooch has the case of the later, take him or her to the vet. The mere sight of your beloved dog shake during his or her sleep is disturbing for the dog owner, and mostly because they are unsure of what is causing it and whether or not the dog is in pain. The safest way to find out of course is to get a checkup. There are several health conditions that cause a dog to shake during sleep: the non-alarming Rapid Eye Movement (REM), and the health-regarding Epileptic Seizures and Ballistocardiogenic Tremor.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Muscle Spasms
Muscle spasms during sleep are not pleasant for dogs as they're not pleasant for humans. When it comes to our four-legged friends, they happen because of bad dreams, and they are totally normal. However, if they get really bad, you should consult your vet. You should also take a moment to think did you feed your dog anything new lately, and has he or she been eating before bedtime? If the answers are "yes," then take the food into consideration as a reason for the muscle spasms. It's maybe what they're eating that is causing the nightmares. If it can happen to humans, it can happen to dogs, but check with the vet to be on the safe side.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Kicking
Kicking is a side-effect of your dog's dreams. During a dream, the brain cuts the connection to the parts that control movements in order to stop the dreamer from physically acting out the dreams, and thus quite possibly, keeping the body safe. But of course, that disconnection isn't perfect - It's the same things with dogs as it is with humans. You probably noticed that your very own legs twitch as you start to dream. Dogs also have the same mechanism, so a kick or two are not alarming, despite the fact that they may seem strange and shocking to the watchful human eye. However, if the movements get excessive and a lot more aggressive than before, maybe your dog's disconnect mechanism is faltering or maybe he's just getting more deep sleep and dreaming more. If your pet is getting hurt in the process, consult a vet.

Dog Dreams and Sleep Bark Reasons

Sleep Run
The most shocking and unusual of all doggy things regarding sleep, sleep running is the most normal one of them all. It is important for the owner to restrain himself or herself from waking the dog up, because it can cause a slight chaotic moment in the pet's brain. Sleep running is a perfectly normal thing dogs do while in the REM stage of sleep. Your dog is running freely in the safety of his or her own mind, and there is no need to be alarmed. It's just the case of the above mentioned disconnection. Owners who have more experience with dogs love this sort of thing so typical for dogs, because it's usually a really funny, cute experience. Of course, try not to laugh so loudly, so your beloved pooch won't get an unpleasant, distressing wake-up call.








Dog habits
HOW TO REVERSE
BAD DOG HABITS

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General Guidelines for Correcting Your Pet's Misbehavior
When trying to break a dog's bad habits, the owner must take into account the importance of avoiding having his dog's misbehavior reinforced by his actions. The owner must correct his own behavior first before attempting to create changes in his dog's habits. If the owner does things to encourage the dog's misbehavior, it is not surprising that the dog doesn't learn that his actions are displeasing for his owner. For example, if the owner wants his dog to stop barking, the animal won't ever cease with this behavior if the owner gives the dog what he wants as a result of his barking. Indulging in your dog's inappropriate demands will only reinforce his bad habits.

Dog habits

An owner should always be consistent in trying to break his dog's bad habits. If you prompt your dog to do a certain thing one day, and in the next you completely forget about it, you will only succeed in confusing your dog and getting mixed signals is not compatible with a change in behavior. You've got to be committed if you want to break your dog's bad habits. This rule applies to the nature of your commands as well. You need to stick to your commands if you want to force the dog to obey, so make sure every other person uses the same commands as you do. If you want your dog to learn which things are okay to chew and which are not, which places are suitable for urinating or where he is allowed to dig in the yard, you need to provide him the alternative. Interrupt the dog if you spot him misbehaving and direct him to the designated place or toy. When he complies, praise him and give him a treat. This will help the dog accept your alternative and forget all about his previous misbehaviors.

Dog habits

If you want your dog to be trained quickly and efficiently you need to follow a certain schedule. Commitment is again the key in breaking your dog's bad habits. Thus, take some time to practice with your dog without being interrupted by something or someone. No matter how nervous you are about your dog, do not punish him but work on correcting his behavior and praise him when he complies. If your dog has started to pick up bad habits or is forgetting their manners in certain situations, read on to find out how to tackle this behaviour, and reverse bad habits for good.

Dog habits

If Scooter has developed bad habits, it's your job to help him unlearn them. Whether your dog has a chewing, barking, jumping, counter-surfing or digging fetish, scolding or punishing him won't make him stop; it might make things worse, or cause him decide to continue the undesired behavior in your absence. After ruling out medical conditions that could trigger bad habits, learn how to correct his behavior so you both can be happy campers.

Dog habits

Make sure that no one is sabotaging your efforts!
Firstly, it is important to look at why your dog might have fallen into bad habits in the first place! If you are clear that it has simply happened because of a gradual blurring of your dog's boundaries and a failure on your part to correct bad behaviour, this is relatively straightforward, and the onus is on you to undo the problem! Also, talk to your family and anyone else that lives with you to ensure that they understand your dog's boundaries, and are not inadvertently undoing all of your good work and confusing your dog, such as by feeding them when they beg, or allowing them to sleep on their beds if these things are forbidden.


Setting clear boundaries
Decide upfront what you want to achieve, and what is and is not allowed of your dog. If you are not clear about this, your dog certainly won't be! Physical boundaries are important too in some cases, for instance, if you want your dog to stop digging up a flowerbed, fence it off, or supervise your dog in the garden until they learn to leave it alone. You can always close doors to rooms that your dog is not allowed into, or keep items that your dog is prone to taking without permission out of their reach.


Removing the reward gained from bad behaviour
Whatever undesirable behaviour your dog is manifesting, their ultimate desire to do it will come down to a simple equation of action and reward. For instance, if your dog likes to dig through the bin, their reward comes from potentially finding food scraps. If your dog enjoys chewing on your shoes or a certain item of furniture, the sensations and textures that this provides will be a reward of its own. Sleeping on a human's bed might be snuggly, warm and comfortable and just what they want! There is a twofold aspect to removing the reward from behaviours of these types: ensuring that your dog does not gain from the bad behaviour, and providing a viable alternative for them. Here are some examples:

If your dog likes to dig in the bin, you can use child catches to keep the bin firmly closed, and ensure that any food waste is placed in your outside bin right away. Offer treats when your dog willingly leaves the bin alone when told.

If your dog is prone to chewing things that they should not, consider using a dog-safe repellent spray on the items in question so that they are unpalatable to your dog, and provide good alternatives to chew.

For dogs that like to sleep on the bed, either close off the room in question, or find other ways to make it undesirable such as turning down the heating or removing the bedding from the bed during the day. Make sure that your dog has a nice snug bed of his or her own to go to!


Positive reinforcement and redirection
Positive reinforcement training is the most effective way of teaching a dog to do anything, so use a combination of redirection and positive reinforcement to teach them new behaviour patterns. When your dog is up to no good, tell them "no" firmly, and when they pause or stop, offer a treat and praise. Keep repeating this procedure until your dog gets the hang of it, and comes to learn that there is a better reward on offer if they are good!


Boundaries and Supervision
Restricting Scooter's access can keep him from giving into bad habits, such as chewing off-limit items and raiding the trash. Use baby gates to barricade off-limit areas, or confine him to a crate or dog-proof room when you can't watch him. When you're home, watch him like a hawk. The moment he gives into his bad habit, blow a whistle, shake a can of coins or squirt him with water to break his concentration. With consistency, he'll stop the behavior to avoid the unpleasant consequence.


Aversives
Use the element of surprise or textures or flavors to teach Scooter right from wrong. If he's chewing inappropriate items, spray them with a commercial dog deterrent that will make him think twice about repeating his behavior; if he's lounging on the couch, spread an upside-down carpet runner over it; if he's digging up the yard, install a motion-detecting sprinkler system to startle him. Do this consistently while you figure out what's triggering his undesired habits.


Redirecting
Rather than punishing bad behavior, reinforce good behavior. Each time you catch Scooter giving into a bad habit, stop him and redirect him to a desired activity. For instance, if he's chewing on your shoe, make a noise and show him a chew toy, or when he's digging up the yard, show him to his digging pit. When he shows interest in the toy or digging pit, praise him lavishly and offer treats to reinforce the good behavior. With consistency, the pleasant consequences might make him want to repeat the good behavior more than the bad.


Enrichment
Enriching Scooter's life can put a stop to undesired behaviors. Many dogs develop bad habits because they're bored or crave attention. To combat this, increase the amount of physical and mental stimulation Scooter's getting. Take long walks and play games with him, provide a variety of toys to play with for home entertainment and regularly practice obedience training. The quality time spent with you and the release of pent-up energy can make Scooter a well-behaved dog.


Keep your dog occupied
Dogs that are bored or lonely are exponentially more likely to act out and pick up bad habits than other dogs, and it will also be harder to train them out of them. Ensure that your dog is getting enough attention, and is not left alone for long periods of time. Spend plenty of quality time with your dog when you are at home, and ensure that they have plenty of toys and games to keep themselves entertained with!

Finally, ensure that your dog is getting enough exercise to fulfil their needs, as a tired dog is much less likely to get into mischief!








Dog habits
LOOSE A DOG?
DROP & LIE DOWN!

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Have you ever had a dog escape your arms or car or home? What is the first thing you do? If you're like most people, you chase after them. They run and then you run. It seems almost instinctual, doesn't it? I've come to believe that it REALLY IS INSTINCT that takes over when we chase after our loose dogs. It's not just something we do when our own pets get loose, but something we do when a friend's dog gets out of the house or when we see a stray dog running down the street or the highway. There is even a recent video showing police officers chasing after a dog on a highway in California. They never even had a chance of catching him. It was a losing proposition.

Dog habits

The problem with our first instinct (to chase) is that it rarely gets us closer to getting them. In fact, the more we run the more they run, and in most cases, they run even harder and faster. It must be pretty scary seeing a bunch of people chasing you. (Heck! It's scary being a human and having a bunch of people chasing you! I would run too!) I don't imagine a dog is likely to stop and ask itself "Does that person mean me harm?" No. They're probably thinking "I am in danger. I need to run!". The truth is it can be pretty hard to go against the instinct to chase a loose dog, but we really must learn to so, because when we chase we risk putting ourselves and the loose pet in danger.


Dog habits

What to do if a dog gets loose:
Please note: These may not work with every dog, but they have worked with many.

Stop, drop and lie down - It might sound silly, but dogs find the behavior odd. When you don't give chase and instead lie down and lie still, a dog will get curious and will often come back to see if you are okay or to see what you are doing.

Stop, drop, and curl into a ball - This is also a curious behavior for a dog. Because you are not moving and your hands are closely wrapped around your head, they see you as less of a threat and will come to check you out. This gives them a chance to sniff you and realize it's you, their owner, or to allow you to pet them and grab their collar.

Run in the opposite direction - What? Run away from the dog? That's right. Some dogs love a good chase. Instead of you chasing them, let them chase you. Even if the dog is not up for a good chase, he may be curious about your odd behavior and follow along until you can get him into a building or car or someplace where it is easier to corral him.

Sit down with your back or side to the dog and wait – Again, dogs are thrown off by this odd behavior and will become curious and approach. The other advantage is that by sitting down with your side or back to them, you appear less threatening and they are more likely to approach. If you have good treats, place a few around you to draw them near.

Open a car door and ask the dog if she wants to go for a ride - It almost seems too simplistic and silly to be true, but many a dog has been fooled into hopping into a car because they were invited to go for a ride. It makes sense, especially if the dog has learned to associate the car with good things (e.g., the dog park). Although it is no guarantee, I can tell you that I have seen nearly every one of these work with one of our shelter dogs. The key is to fight your instinct to chase the dog and do something that is not as instinctual. Instead, do what seems counter-intuitive to both you and the dog.








Dog habits
HABITS OF DOG OWNERS
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Dog habits
BIZZARE and QUIRKY
DOG BEHAVIOR HABITS

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BIZZARE DOG BEHAVIOR HABITS




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