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ADOPTION & SHELTER DOG AND PUPPY MISCONCEPTIONS
ADOPTION & SHELTER
DOG & PUPPY MISCONCEPTIONS

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Rescue dogs have a lot of opportunities to be adopted? So many dogs need homes in the U.S. - about 3.9 million dogs enter shelters each year, that no one should ever have to buy a pup - there are plenty of rescue dogs to go around. In most high-kill shelters, a dog has only seven days to be adopted. And all shelters operate with tight budgets, spaces, and staffs. The reality is they can't and don't, save every dog. But many people still avoid shelters and rescues when they are searching for a pet - maybe because they believe some of the widespread myths and misconceptions about shelter dogs. We enlisted the help of shelter staff to help us break down these stereotypes and expose the real truth about rescue dogs. Many rumors and misconceptions exist about shelter dogs. The truth is that adopting a shelter dog saves a life and helps make room for another life to be saved. Adopting a new pet is always a big commitment, one that shouldn't be taken lightly, but with the guidance of experienced shelter staff, every family has the chance to take home their perfect new family member.

MYTH: I won't find the dog I want
Many people think that breeders are your only option to find a breed you believe to be your best match, but that is simply not true. We see everything come through our doors from Persians to Goldendoodles. And it's worth noting that while you can expect certain traits from a purebred that doesn't mean they have an edge over their mixed breed counterparts. Studies have shown that mixed breeds tend to live longer and have fewer hereditary disorders.

MYTH: Adoption fees are too expensive
Compared to the cost of purchasing an animal from the pet store or through a breeder, which will charge upwards of $500-$1,000, it's surprisingly more cost-effective to adopt. The adoption fee - ranging anywhere from $50-$250, covers the medical care your pet received while staying at the shelter and licensing paperwork. Alternatively, you pay for these expenses out of pocket when you obtain an animal by other means.

MYTH: They are too old
Haven't you heard that age is just a number? Adult and senior animals can be just as cute and cuddly as their younger counterparts. A lot of people want a puppy or a kitten, but don't want all of the work that comes with it. They need training and supervision. Seniors are less maintenance. Not to mention, they are often already know a few basic commands, have fully developed personalities, and extra perk! come fully housetrained. Just ask anyone who's adopted a senior pet.

MYTH: They are too sickly
Reputable shelters provide medical care to ensure the health of their animals. That can include basic wellness exams, routine vaccinations, medicinal treatments, and more extensive surgery, as well as the rehabilitative care to get an animal back to normal health.

MYTH: They come with too much baggage
On the contrary, many animals are relinquished for reasons that have nothing to do with behavioral problems. According to the American Humane Society, people were more likely to give up ownership of their pets citing the following reasons: the pets were not allowed in their place of residence, death or divorce, allergies, or pet care expenses. And if you are still unsure, some shelters provide a foster-to-adopt option, which gives you more time to assess if you are a good match for each another. And that's something you won't get through a breeder or pet store

MYTH: Certain "types" will only give me trouble, Shelter dogs aren't as well-behaved
It's a sad reality that animals are passed by based on their breed, age, and coloring. Larger dogs, pitbulls and pitbull mixes, black cats, and senior-age animals face the biggest discrimination and, therefore, are often the last to find homes. This proves true even when black cats are avoided based on superstition, and in research conducted by the American Temperant Test Society, pitbulls are ranked as the most tolerant of all dogs, second only to Labrador Retriever. Judge an animal by its individual behavior, not its breed. A reputable shelter will not adopt out an animal that isn't ready. They deserve as much of a chance as any other animal.

MYTH: Adopting is too difficult
One of the biggest mistakes people make is rushing the process. People want the "instant gratification" of walking out the door with a new pet, Mara says, without going through the rigmarole of the application process. And that's understandable. But the initial application, home visit, and meet and greet that a shelter sometimes requires is meant to ensure that you and your potential pet are finding the right match. After all, it should be about what you can do for the dog, rather than looking for what the dog can do for you.

MYTH: Rescue dogs are 2nd rate to the dogs and puppies in pet stores
Dogs in pet stores generally come from puppy mills: large-scale commercial dog breeding operations that prioritize profit over animal welfare. Breeding at puppy mills is performed without consideration of genetic quality, resulting in generations of dogs with unchecked hereditary defects. What's more, the lineage records of puppy mill dogs are often falsified. By adopting a dog, you challenge the cycle of cruelty embedded in the puppy mill industry. And that is a 1st rate thing to do.

MYTH: You never know what you are going to get at a shelter, Shelters aren't clean and shelter dogs aren't healthy
If you have any questions, reputable shelters will be forthcoming about any known behavioral or health issues. That includes bite history, how they are around other animals, the extent of their training, and whether they were pulled from a city shelter or if it was an owner surrender. Furthermore, when you adopt a shelter pet, you gain access to a wealth of carefully vetted resources including recommended veterinarians, professional walkers and, a network of trainers should you need them. Adopters frequently call their shelter for quick advice, which they happily provide.

MYTH: Rescue dogs need extra training
All dogs, regardless of age, breed, or life experience, require training to coexist with their humans. Many rescue dogs have gone through some training, whether in their previous home or a foster home, or with volunteers and professional trainers connected with their shelter or rescue group. They are also evaluated for temperament and activity level, among other things, in order to be matched with the best-possible home.

MYTH: A shelter pet won't bond with a new owner
Maybe at first. But this is expected. Your new dog or cat companion may be shy or scared. Give the animal space, provide a quiet nook, and over time, they will adapt to their new home and their new life with you. And if it turns out not to be the perfect match? You might fall in love with an animal and it doesn't work out. "That's okay. Be patient. There's always another animal that needs a home.

MYTH: They are all "damaged goods"
While some people believe all shelter dogs have experienced abuse or neglect, that's not always the case, Dowling explained. The most common reasons animals are brought into shelters involve lifestyle changes on the owner's part, as opposed to problems the dog has. Most dogs in shelters come from homes a lot like yours. Damaged goods? The majority of our animals are turned into the shelter because of human issues, not animal issues. Even when shelter dogs have experienced some tough times, it doesn't mean they wouldn't make great pets.

MYTH: Shelters will make me jump through "hoops" to take home a dog
It's true that shelters want to identify the best possible homes for the dogs in their care. But consider this: Shelters do this because the staff working with these animals come to know and love them, just like adopters come to know and love their pets. Shelters wants to place animals in homes. That's our goal - No hoops! If you are a good home, we will gladly adopt an animal to you. \ Shelter dogs are usually vaccinated, microchipped and spayed or neutered before they are adopted - so most of the hoops have already been cleared by the shelter team. Also, remember different shelters and rescues have different screening processes. If you don't like how you are being treated, try a different shelter or rescue.

MYTH: In shelter I can't choose the breed/color/sex I want
Sometimes adopters can't find exactly what they think they want in a dog, but it turns out OK. It's especially joyful to watch dog owners who came in with very specific expectations, only to leave with a new four-legged friend who looks nothing like their "dream dog" but makes them feel ecstatic nonetheless. Mixed-breed dogs can offer a compromise. If you can't decide between two breeds, adopt a mixed-breed dog. You will get the best of both worlds. But if you have your heart set on a black pug or a male Irish setter, there are plenty of breed-specific rescues to check out.

MYTH: All shelter dogs are pit bulls
There are a lot of pit bulls in shelters. There are also a lot of other types of dogs. The only way to find out is to visit your local shelter or search online for adoptable dogs in your area. We do receive many "blockhead" breeds, which are bully breeds. About 30 % of the dogs at her shelter are "blockheads," which include pit bull and American Staffordshire terriers, but the other 70 % represent a wide variety of different breeds. If you do wind up falling in love with a pit bull and taking her home, way to go, because pitties are awesome.

MYTH: You don't know the kind of dog you will be adopting
Shelters will make sure that the dog you choose is a good fit for your needs, lifestyle and vice versa. Any dog would make a wonderful companion, but there are some dogs who will need more training and others who are fully housebroken. Some dogs will require an abundance of exercise and attention. Other furry pals are simply satisfied by cozying up on the couch and staring happily at your every movement around the house. Before they send you home with your new best friend, shelter workers will make sure to inquire about your lifestyle and the kind of dog you are looking for. It's all part of the wonderful process. They will help you find the perfect match! Another bullet to add to the pros of adopting is that your dog will come with a microchip and have had taken all their shots.

MYTH: All shelter dogs are old
This is not the case at all. According to The Dodo, the average age of dogs entering shelters is 18 months old. There are also plenty of accidental litters, which means there are countless of sweet, adorable puppies in need of a forever home. Most people want to adopt a puppy because they are so excited about starting a new blank slate with a bundle of furry cuteness. However, they often forget to take into account how much time, patience and dedication is required to train a puppy. Owning a fur baby can be as difficult as raising a child. It's a full-time commitment. Don't be so quick to pass up adopting an older dog because there are plenty of perks that come with age such as they may already be housebroken.

MYTH: There is always something wrong with a shelter dog
Many people have a pre-misconception that shelter dogs have many health issues. On the contrary to popular beliefs, most shelter dogs are healthier than purchased dogs. Purebred dogs come from inbreeding, which causes a genetic disposition that leads to a variety of physical health problems in the long run. Breeders will often breed dogs from the same family to create more dogs. On average, mixed breeds tend to live longer and healthier lives because there is no inbreeding going on.

MYTH: It is a long and tedious process to adopt a dog
All you need in life is love and a dog. Adopting a dog from the shelter is a very simple and easy process. You will have plenty of friendly, animal-loving shelter workers guide you in every step of the way. Even if it takes a little time, the wait is so minuscule compared to the grand scheme of adopting your new fur baby into the family.

MYTH: If the rescue process is a humane act, why is an adoption fee required?!
Dog rescue process:
1) Start by visiting the nearest pet shelter and get to see the various breeds of dogs available. During this time you will be asked various questions. Some of them include: Your housing situation, Number and ages of your children, Number and types of other pets you own, Name and contacts of your veterinarian.

2) Take time to pick a pet that is suitable for you and your family.

3) Fill out the application forms and pay the adoption fee.

4) Visit the animal shelter with your family in order to determine if you are suitable.

5) Wait for the application to be approved or rejected by the shelter.

6) Once approved, visit the shelter to pick your dog.

MYTH: All animal shelters are directly managed by larger organizations - ASPCA, HSUS
False. In fact, according to Ayse Dunlap, Director of Operations for the Cleveland Animal Protective League (APL), which services about 16,000 animals a year. Most rescues and shelters run solely on grants and donations from the surrounding communities, unless they are government facilities like county rescues.

MYTH: Shelter personnel don't know enough about pets
Shelter's workers are generally quite knowledgeable and often the shelter's greatest resource. You can find people like veterinary technicians volunteering at shelters oftentimes, as well as actual veterinarians, behaviorists, and other animal specialists. They know the dogs' personality, temperament, likes, dislikes, even the food that the pet prefers. In fact, once you determine which pet you'd like to adopt it's best to ask what food he/she is currently being fed. Many shelters receive food donations by pet food companies and therefore are best left on the same food until you can consult a veterinarian.

MYTH: Animal shelters only have dogs and cats
Not truth! Many rescues, including Cleveland APL, have small mammal adoptions and offer rabbits, guinea pigs and other small four-leggers like gerbils. You can even rescue birds like parrots!

MYTH: The breed rescue people will take my old, dying dog and care for him/her in their final days or The rescue group will pay for my dog's spay/neuter, cancer surgery...
Breed rescue is not a free clinic for dogs. They barely get by as it is. Vet care is part of pet ownership, just as pediatric care is part of parenting. If your dog is old and suffering, please, end that suffering. Yes, it is hard to do, but you have to look at the quality of the dog's life. If s/he can no longer get around on their own, they are not enjoying their life.

MYTH: Breed rescue will give anyone a pair of intact dogs to start their own kennel, so they can breed puppies and sell them
The truth is, shelters aim to REDUCE the number of dogs who wind up in shelters, unloved and unwanted, not to help boost those numbers. No ethical rescue person will adopt out a dog who is intact, PERIOD. It totally defeats the purpose of rescue. Having a dog with AKC papers does not mean you should keep them intact and able to breed. WRONG! AKC papers only to show the lineage of your dog and for "show" people to gain championship titles in a CONFORMATION Ring. Your dog is most likely NOT a show dog and needs to be spay & neutered or its offspring will wind up in rescue also. You can use your AKC papers to enter agility, earthdog, rally, obedience, and your dog does not need to be intact unsprayed & unneutered.

MYTH: Breed rescue groups are against breeding altogether, and have nothing to do with those who breed dogs
Actually, many people involved with rescue are breeders themselves. What we are against is irresponsible breeders who don't know what they are doing. Breeding is not something to be taken lightly. It is not something one just "does", out of curiosity, to "teach the kids about nature" or to make some extra pocket money. When done correctly, breeding is not profitable, and is done ONLY to improve the overall quality of the breed. There are many people out there who breed simply to satiate the demands of the "pet" market, which ends up weakening the genetic pool of the given breed. This is what most rescuers are against, because we do not want to see anything happen that will diminish the quality of the dogs we love so much.

MYTH: In Shelter there are people who have dogs that sniff in rubble or avalanches to find bodies or trapped people or These are the people who train dogs to help the disabled
Nope, not them! The first is Search and Rescue, the second is Service Dogs. However, many of the dogs that are trained to work in both of the above groups are taken from shelters. So in that sense, I suppose they really are rescue dogs.

MYTH: Breed rescue groups scale fences in the dead of night to take dogs out of abusive homes, kick in doors and raid puppy mills
They do none of this generally. But this is what most people think of when they see & hear the word "rescue". When we say "rescue", it is generally in reference to "rescuing" the dog from a shelter, rather than see it be put to sleep when no one adopts or claims them. Some groups will not take owner turn ins at all, opting to take dogs out of shelters only. As for puppy mills, if there is a raid on a mill - organized by the police or USDA, who license the mills, they will sometimes contact the local rescue groups to aid in caring for the dogs that are seized.

MYTH: Shelter pets are usually quite dirty
Not true, they may come in looking like ragamuffins, but they shine with delight after they are cleaned up and given medications, shots, and spay & neuter surgery, if needed. Some animal rescues even make it a habit to have regular grooming sessions for the pets they have. Volunteers are tasked with brushing, clipping nails and bathing the animals at shelters. And let's keep in mind folks, these are animals - they naturally have a smell, so cut them a break. Cleveland APL, for instance, tries hard to groom most every dog that comes in - at least with a good bath and brushing!

MYTH: Animal shelters are sad places
This also depends on how you look at the situation. Some go into an animal shelter and see confused faces looking back at them. But imagine if these faces were out on the cold, harsh street with nothing to eat and no friends. With no one to care for them. With no one to talk to them. These animals are being saved, and hence, you should look at the glass as half-full in every animal shelter's case and in every animal's case. So why not save a precious life, and add a special love and joy to your own? Debunk these myths and adopt your next dog !!!








RESCUED DOGS TOUCHING STORIES & VIDEOS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!
RESCUED DOGS:
HEART TOUCHING STORIES
AND VIDEOS

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1. - A blind dog unable to walk is abandoned at a shelter and about to be euthanized. Thank dog hoomans came to the rescue!
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2. - This dog is rescued and a few days later gives her rescuers quite a surprise.

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3. - This aptly named brother and sister were rescued as the Endeavour space shuttle flew over.

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4. - This man saves 7 puppies in a very tight squeeze.

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5. - A Singapore street dog with an amazing story.

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6. - I bet they never thought going traveling would bring them a new best friend.

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7. - He just wanted to be loved.

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8. - Tears all round!

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9. - These 4 pups now have a second chance at a happy ending.

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RESCUED DOGS:
FULL ADOPTION GUIDE

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We are all familiar with the words "A dog is for life, not just for Christmas", and we know that behind that slogan lies the unfortunate fact that many people do not realise that bringing a new dog into their home takes a huge amount of preparation, perseverance and patience. For those adopting a rescue dog, the challenges can be much greater, and it is vital for new owners to do whatever they can to ensure that their rescue dog adapts well to its new and loving home as quickly as possible.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

By choosing a rescue dog, you are saving the life of a creature who depends upon humans for care and shelter. You are giving them a fresh start and a new home, and in return, you will be given unconditional love. By following the simple steps in this guide, you can make the process of rehoming your dog as smooth and stress-free as possible for the both of you.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!
Key Points and Advice
One of the simplest things to consider before rehoming a rescue dog is whether now is the right time for you to rescue. If you are planning a holiday, a house move, a new baby or a new job within the coming months, it might be a good idea to postpone your adoption until all of these distractions are out of the way. When a new dog comes into your life, whether a rescue or not, it is really important that you can give him your full attention at all times. Rescue dogs, in particular, can be very nervous in their new environment, and a busy household with no routine can be terrifying for some dogs.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

If you do have enough time to give to a rescue dog, the next consideration should be what type of dog is right for you. Consider how much exercise you can offer your new dog, what level of dog-handling experience you have, and whether you need a dog that is comfortable with other pets or small children. For example, if you live in a busy city with small children and other pets, adopting a Border Collie that has only ever lived outside on a farm is likely to be a very bad idea!

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

A rescue centre can talk through all of your needs and match their available dogs to your exact requirements. Do not be afraid to take your time when choosing a rescue dog, and if you don't think there are any suitable dogs when you visit the rescue centre, do not be tempted to settle for something unsuitable, in the hope that you can "fix" the issues. It is far kinder, to the dog and to your family, to walk away and wait for the right dog for you.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!
Prepare your home for rescue dog!
Spending some time preparing for your dog's arrival can help him settle down as quickly as possible, and can make life a lot easier for you too. It is inevitable that you and your new pet will feel nervous when you get home on the first day, so make life easy for yourself with some forward planning.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

The rescue centre should be able to advise you on what food your new dog has been eating, and it's a good idea to stick with that for a week or two at least, to avoid any upset tummies. Treats are also a good idea, as they are invaluable as rewards when teaching dogs new behaviours. Do not go overboard, though, as it is easy to overfeed dogs. Decide where they are going to eat and keep that consistent. The place where you feed him should be quiet and safe, without the distraction of other pets or children.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

As well as food and drink, your dog also needs a safe space to call his own. This space is where he will sleep, but is also where he can learn to go when he wants some quiet time. Not everyone likes the idea of using a dog crate, but when used sensitively and responsibly, crates can be an effective tool in training your dog to be a balanced and happy pet. Most dogs actually love their crates and see them as their own "den". Try covering the top of the crate with a blanket for added comfort and security.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

Pet insurance should be next on your list and the final things you need to buy before you bring your new dog home are a collar and lead, a plentiful supply of poop bags, and perhaps one or two dog toys. Rubber "Kongs" are great for dogs, as they are virtually indestructible and can be filled with tasty treats to keep your dog entertained.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

Lastly, before you bring your new dog home, make sure that you talk about his arrival with all members of your family. It is important to explain, to children in particular, that the dog will be very nervous about coming to a new home, and will need plenty of time and space to settle in. A house full of over-excited children, or visitors dropping in to see the new addition, can be overwhelming for a dog. Explain that there will be plenty of time to get to know the new dog once he's had time to settle in.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!
What to Expect from the Dog on Arrival
Hopefully, you will already have spent some time with your new dog as most rescue centres will ask you to visit them several times before releasing a dog into your care. Usually, you will also be asked to take your dog for a few walks, to get to know him and to be 100% sure that you are right for each other. Even with all of this careful planning, your new dog may still be frightened by the rehoming process, and may even be travel-sick on the journey home.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

Once you get home, take the dog out of the car, put him on the lead and allow him to walk around the garden briefly, to go to the toilet and to get his bearings. Then bring him into the house, and show him his bed and food and water bowls.

Make sure that your dog understands where his safe place is, so that he can go there whenever he needs to. If you are using a dog crate, it can be a good idea to feed your dog in the crate too, so that he associates the crate with the positive experience of being fed. Do not try shutting the door of the crate until the dog has come to see it as his own space.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

Only feed a light meal on the first evening, whilst your dog settles down. Don't try to fuss the dog too much, and simply let him relax, whilst you sit quietly or go about your routine.

With the sensory overload that comes with entering a new home for the first time, your dog may not be particularly responsive and may not want to be stroked or handled. On the other hand, he may be wildly over-excited and try to tear around the house. Let the dog go at his own pace, but try to control the environment so that he settles as quickly as possible.

RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!
Introduction & The Beginning...
When the time comes to introduce children and other pets, it is important to take a softly-softly approach, to avoid distressing your new dog. Explain to your children that they should sit calmly on the sofa and wait for the dog to approach them. Tell them to sit quietly, without shouting or making any sudden movements. This will allow the dog to approach carefully and to assess these new and curious creatures on his own terms.

With other dogs, it can be a good idea to have the first meeting take place outdoors, ideally, take them on a walk where there is more space for each animal to feel safe in. Let the dogs introduce themselves, but keep a close eye on them, in case you need to intervene. Until the new dog is fully settled, make sure that mealtimes are closely supervised, and do not leave your rescue dog alone with your other dogs.

When introducing your new rescue dog to your cat, it can be a good idea to keep the dog on the lead, even if sitting in the lounge. That way, the cat can approach the dog and introduce itself in its own time, while you maintain full control of the dog. Always make sure that a cat has a safe space to escape to, if the introductions do not go perfectly.

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Building a Bond with Your Dog
It can be tempting to try to rush the process of bonding with your dog, by constantly stroking him or even picking him up. To a dog, all of this can be quite intimidating. It is far better to take things slowly and allow the dog to come to you, just by spending time in the same room together, sitting quietly and speaking gently, the dog will soon come to realise there is nothing to be fearful of.

Once you have got over the first hurdles of the dog being confident in your presence, you can work on building that special relationship through a variety of techniques. It is important that your dog sees you as a provider of fun, so play freely and enthusiastically with him. However, be sure to let your dog know that you control when and how play time goes, this is important for training a well-mannered dog. Other things that can help to build trust include regular grooming and handling. Take this very slowly, and allow the dog to get used to you touching all parts of his body, including ears, feet, tail, head and muzzle. This can be a very long process with many rescue dogs, but with time, it will build a solid relationship between you.

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Housetraining
It is inevitable that there will be a few "accidents" when introducing a new dog to your home, but there are ways to make sure that these are kept to the minimum. Try to ensure that your dog is let outside to go to the toilet on a regular basis, and particularly before bedtime. Tune into when the dog is trying to tell you that he needs to go outside, he may whine, or sit by the door, for example. A crate can help with housetraining too, as dogs do not like to soil their sleeping area, so he will learn quickly to go before bedtime and to strengthen his control, to allow him to last until morning. If you do have any accidents, avoid cleaning products that contain ammonia as these can actually encourage your dog to pee in that place again. Try white vinegar instead.

SHELTERS, RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!
Establish Daily Routines
Dogs are creatures of habit, and like things to follow a routine. By providing consistency, you will help him understand what his new life involves and he will grow into a relaxed pooch. Try to walk the dog at the same times each day, and keep mealtimes regular too. Do not move the dog's bed around, as he needs to be sure of where that safe space is.

It is easy to cut a rescue dog some slack at the beginning, telling yourself that he is just settling in. However, by allowing bad habits, such as jumping up, pulling on the lead, or using his mouth when playing, you could be doing more harm than good. These behaviours soon become entrenched, and it is much harder to train bad behaviour out of a dog than to train good behaviour in. Dogs usually learn things very quickly, so with some patience and calm perseverance, you should see the results of any training undertaken before long.

SHELTERS, RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!
Veterinary Care for Your Rescue Dog
It is very important to try to get your new friend used to visits to your veterinary practice. The veterinary team need to be established as friends and associated with positive experiences as much as possible, not just times of illness. With this in mind, ask your veterinary team whether they would be happy for you to pop in for a free introduction, just an opportunity for your dog to visit the practice and be pampered by the staff, not examined, prodded and poked! So, if a veterinary examination or vaccination is due, maybe do this on a separate occasion. In an ideal world, your dog should have visited the vets on several occasions for a good pampering and maybe a treat before any more "practical" visits are required. Most caring veterinary teams will be happy to oblige with this as they know how important it is for dogs to feel comfortable coming into the vets - particularly rescue dogs who may have had previous bad experiences.

SHELTERS, RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!
Conclusion
Dogs can find themselves in a rescue centre for all sorts of reasons. It's easy to write off these animals as being "too difficult" or "problem dogs". However, with some forward planning and plenty of patience and gentle, positive handling, a rescue dog can be every bit as rewarding as any other dog, if not more so! If you are considering bringing a new dog into your life, why not consider adopting a rescue dog?

SHELTERS, RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

Keep in mind the truth, that any adoption or rescuing of puppy or a dog should cost some money.

Dog and Puppy infograms, infographics - (c) by Mary Nielsen - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!








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Pat Miller

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The tides of dog ownership are changing, and thanks to Hollywood A Listers like George Clooney and Sandra Bullock and music icons like Justin Bieber and Taylor Swift, animal rescue has become as fashionable as the latest Valentino or Armani. Millions of ordinary Americans heroes one and all have opened their hearts and homes to rescue dogs, and fewer abandoned pets are euthanized in the U.S. than ever before. And still, a look at HSUS statistics reminds us how far we have to go: an estimated three to four million pets are euthanized annually, a very significant improvement from the 1980s when the number was closer to sixteen million.

To keep America's adoption trend moving forward and to guarantee that rescued dogs stay in their new forever homes, Tracy Libby's The Rescue Dog Problem Solver seeks to make the story of every adopted dog a predestined success. While most dogs wind up in shelters due to no fault of their own, many rescue dogs develop unwanted behaviors while living with their previous owners. To assure their success with their adopted dogs, rescuers must be prepared to handle and confidently resolve behavioral problems that arise through proven positive training methods. This eye-opening problem-solving guide, filled with empowering stories of rescued dogs that defied the odds, is dedicated to the success of every rescuer and his happy, health companion dog.

INSIDE THE BOOK:
50 ways rescuers can overcome potential challenges with their adoptive dogs

200 training and behavior tips for a well-mannered dog

25 secrets to unraveling common behavior issues, from house-soiling and escaping the yard to biting, barking, and hyperactivity

A dozen heartwarming stories of real-life rescue dogs and their adoptive parents Countless ways dog lovers can raise awareness about animal rescue and responsible pet ownership in their communities and found enjoyable.


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You Can Build a Bridge to a Better Life for Dogs! Pat Miller's How to Foster Dogs is the first book on the market to deal specifically with the care and training needs of foster dogs and how the fostering process works when done through a formal arrangement with an organization like a shelter or breed rescue group. Fostering dogs involves caring on a temporary basis for puppies and dogs who for whatever reason cannot be housed with their owners, shelters or breed rescue organizations. Many shelters now have formal fostering programs for dogs who are too young, unhealthy or have behavioral issues and therefore have to be housed with a foster family or face euthanasia. The book also covers informal fostering situations when families move or have some disruption and a friend or relative agrees to care for the dog temporarily.

YOU WILL LEARN:
About the various organizations that seek the services of foster families for dogs.

What a typical formal arrangement between a shelter and a foster parent involves including expectations of care and training, and the support you can expect from the shelter including covering expenses and other legal issues.

About the most common behavioral issues facing foster dogs and puppies including fear and separation anxiety, a likely undeserved reputation for what may have been perceived as "dominance," and irritating but usually solvable problems such as house soiling, chewing and barking.

How to successfully integrate a foster dog into your home if you own other dogs.

While it is possible that you will end up adopting the dog yourself, learn how to prepare to say goodbye to your foster best friend knowing that you have done your best to build a bridge to a better future for him or her.








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FOSTERING THE DOG:
PROS vs CONS

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If you knew more about what fostering dogs or puppies entails, and the benefits it provides, is it something you would consider? The primary goal of fostering is to temporarily home and prepare a puppy or dog for adoption. As with everything in life, there are pros and cons.

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Which breed, mix, age, size, or sex would you be most comfortable with. Are you willing to take a senior dog? Would you consider a puppy or dog with a disability or health problem? How does your family feel about fostering dogs?

SHELTERS, RESCUED DOGS, ADOPT A DOG or A PUPPY!!!

If you have a pet, how would he or she react to another animal moving in on their turf? Remember, everyone should be comfortable with this decision. For how long are you willing to make the commitment? Some fosters prefer short-term commitments. Others, for however long it takes. Would you be able to give up the animal, especially knowing it would be going to a loving home. Would you be willing to adopt your foster, if no forever home is their fate?

FOSTERING, ADOPTION, RESCUED DOGS AND PUPPY

There will be changes in your routine - most likely for the better. You will exercise more! You may have to provide the food. There are rescues that occasionally help with the food expenses. The most common complaint heard is how attached a foster has become to their animal. Usually this is made from less experienced fosters. Those who have done it before, have an easier time "letting go." They are happy their foster has found a loving family, forever home. There is also another side to the attachment complaint. It is not unheard of for the foster parent to decide to keep their ward. Everyone is a winner!

FOSTERING, ADOPTION, RESCUED DOGS AND PUPPY

The majority of shelter dogs are mid-size or larger, and/or mix breeds. If there is a specific breed you prefer, check with rescues of that breed. They are overloaded, and are looking for foster homes too. Some of the animals in rescues and shelters have health issues, disabilities, or behavior problems. Would this be a problem for you? There are fosters who prefer to take on the tender, loving care of a senior, or terminally ill animal. They want to offer them the best quality of life, in the short time they may have left. They, without question, are extraordinary people. Kudos to them!

FOSTERING, ADOPTION, RESCUED DOGS AND PUPPY

The animal you foster may require basic obedience or housebreaking training. Are you willing to invest the necessary time to make them more adoptable? You most likely will have to pass a background check and home inspection. It's gratifying to know you have met the shelter or rescues standards, and qualify to provide a temporary home. Most shelters/rescues will take care of necessary veterinary and medication expenses. Astonishingly, there fosters, who absorb those expenses as part of their responsibilities. They too deserve kudos! By fostering, it will be one less animal destroyed, and you will be creating a vacancy so the shelter/rescue can offer another puppy or dog a roof over their head, and food in their belly, until they find their forever home.

Bottom Line.
You will earn the unconditional love and appreciation of the animal you have opened your heart and home to, for however long that may be. You will have the rewarding feeling of saving at least one puppy or dog, from being destroyed simply because there are so many out there, that need our help.








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SHELTER DOG MYTHS
SHELTER DOGS TOP MYTHS

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1. They are in the shelter because something is wrong with them
This myth comes from common misunderstandings about how dogs wind up in shelters in the first place. The perception is that dogs end up in animal shelters because they were strays, they were seized in police raids, or they were aggressive. So, they will tend to run away, they will have emotional problems because of how they were treated, or they are just vicious. But, in reality, a big reason that dogs wind up in shelters is because they were given up by their owners for reasons that have nothing to do with the dog's behavior. A lot of families give up their dogs because they can't afford them anymore, or they are forced to move to a place where they can not have dogs or, worse, can not have a dog of a particular breed.

SHELTER DOG MYTHS

Dogs also end up in shelters when expectations and reality don't meet, that little Dalmatian puppy grew up into a large, energetic dog living in a studio apartment, or that lap dog that was so cute in the pet store became uncontrollable and dominant because its cuteness earned nothing but affection, affection, affection, so the dog never had any rules, boundaries, or limitations. The only thing inherently wrong with a shelter dog is that it's in a shelter and not with a loving family.

SHELTER DOG MYTHS
2. You will never know their history
While this may be true, it's not a bad thing, because that shelter dog will never really know its own history, either, especially not once it's brought into a loving home with good Pack Leaders. Dogs don't dwell on the past, and we should not either, especially when it comes to dogs. There are shelters that offer a glimpse of the dog's story, but that's not necessarily a good thing because, again, humans like to dwell in the past. Whether the dog was abused by children, thrown out of a car, rescued from a dog-fighting ring, or whatever traumatic event she went through, it's past. Dogs live in the moment. A dog's past will only be a problem if you constantly dwell on what happened before the shelter. The dog forgot about it once it was not happening anymore, and you can help the dog forget as well by not triggering anything that resembles that early trauma.

SHELTER DOG MYTHS
3. They may have a disease
Yes, they may, kennel cough being particularly common. However, most shelters nowadays will also provide you with a voucher for a subsidized or no-cost first vet visit, and the more devastating diseases have vaccines that are routinely provided by the shelter, like the DHPP (Distemper/Hepatitis/Parvovirus/Parainfluenza) shot, as well as a rabies vaccination. Shelters also make sure that dogs are free of fleas and worms, and they provide spaying and neutering as part of the adoption process.

SHELTER DOG MYTHS
4. They are not purebred
Unless you are a breeder or are looking for a professional show dog, mixed breed dogs are a much better choice. They are generally free of genetic or behavioral problems that are typical of some pure breeds, like hip dysplasia in German shepherds or incessant digging by terriers. Mixed breed dogs are also just much more interesting looking, since they do not follow the strict standards required for purebreds. Finally, if you live in an area with breed specific laws (BSL) that ban certain dogs, like pit bulls or Rottweilers, having that other identifiable breed in the mix can avoid issues with your dog being outlawed.

SHELTER DOG MYTHS
5. They are too old
Adopting a puppy can be an attractive idea, you get to start out with a four-legged blank slate, and raise it to adulthood. However, people often focus on the "cute" part and forget the reality of raising a puppy: it can be just as intense and difficult as raising a child, and it is also a full time job. You can also never be absolutely sure with a puppy what you will wind up with as an adult. You may want a medium size dog and the shelter thought that the puppy you have adopted was mostly beagle. What happens, then, when the other part turns out to be a St. Bernard or Great Dane and the dog you expected to weigh 30 pounds tops out at 150? And don't discount senior dogs, which are those aged 7 years or more. Senior dogs can be ideal for lower-energy households, or in situations where you don't want to commit for ten or fifteen whole years but still want a loving companion.








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