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DOG SMILE
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Dog Smile
Smiling Dogs
Dog Smiles in Commercials
Dog Facial Expressions, Fun & Mimics
Dog Facial Expressions
Smiling Dogs Photos, Pictures and Videos
Do Dogs Smile?
Dog's Playface
Dog Smiles
Dog's Happyface





Dog Smile

How To Make Your Dog Laugh
Humans can imitate sounds of dog laughter, but it takes conscious monitoring of mouth shape to get the sound pattern right. Producing dog laughter correctly, says Coren, can make your dog sit up, wag his tail, approach you from across the room, and even laugh along.

dog smile

1.Round your lips slightly to make a "hhuh" sound. Note: The sound has to be breathy with no actual voicing, meaning that if you touch your throat while making this sound, you should not feel any vibration.

2 Use an open-mouthed smiling expression to make a "hhah" sound. Again, breathe the sound - do not voice it.

3 Combine steps one and two to create canine laughter. It should sound like "hhuh-hhah-hhuh-hhah."






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Dog smile, Do dogs smile?

Do not let the dogs to fool you!
Humans are the only species that smiles!
Other apes do not smile, nor do dogs smile.




Dog smile, Do dogs smile? Dog smiles in commercials & vine
PLAY FACE ("Dog's Smile")
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Dog smile

Play Face
Because this display represents more confidence in the dog-whereas the submissive grin suggests little, this behavior is known to progress in intensity and positivity into a more playful and happy countenance: the play face.

Dog smile

The "play face" expression is an intensification of the greeting grin (Fox 1972, Fox 1977). The ears are erect and forward, anatomy permitting, and panting may occur. At the same time, the tail is often high and wagging while the front is in the play bow (Fox 1972).


Dog smile, Do dogs smile? Dog smiles in commercials & vine

Mimic Grin
A few dogs that are passively submissive will show the "mimic grin" facial expression (left, Beaver 1981). The expression is easily confused with an aggressive one because of the bared teeth, but with the mimic grin, all other body signals indicate submission.


Dog smile

The Greeting Grin
Greeting Grin which is distinguished by lacking the display of teeth. Because of this, the Greeting Grin is rarely misinterpreted by laymen as a canine "smile."

The "greeting grin" is associated with active submission. This facial expression resembles a human smile, with the corners of the mouth pulled back (Fox 1972). It is seen only in human-dog interactions, not in dog-dog ones (Fox 1976).

Dog smile

This is the most appropriate behavior that humans should associate with "smiling" in dogs. Note that the mouth is open but the lips are not retracted in a way to bare the front teeth, the whisker pad is relaxed, the brow is not furrowed, the ears are active and forward, and the tail is engaged. The dog is not sending mixed signals and is truly at ease and inviting positive interactions without fear. By its effect, the play face is a distance reducing behavior (come play with me!). This behavior is often coupled with the "play bow."


Dog smile

Agonistic Pucker:
This behavior falls in the dominant, aggressive, and agonistic type of signals. In the case of canine interactions "agonistic" is most often used to refer to aggressive behavior but can also include behaviors related to dominance displays, submission, and defensiveness. During an agonistic pucker, the canid's lips are drawn away from the teeth exposing the incisors and canine teeth, the skin above and to the sides of the nasal plane (nose pad) wrinkles, the corners of the mouth are drawn forward shortening the commissures, the tongue may be drawn back in preparation for a bite, or it may protrude to create a combination of an agonistic pucker with a tongue flick/distancing signal. (Handleman 2008)




Dog smile

Behaviors and emotions are complex and stochastic, they are not always deterministic and unique and monotonic. What appears to be the same behavior can be sending different messages depending on the context and combination of other signals. Dogs can and do send mixed signals. The first lesson we need to learn, however is that we can and should not anthropomorphise our dog's behaviors because we think they look like something we understand more clearly in human behavior.








So, Do Dogs Smile?
SO, DO DOGS SMILE?
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There are countless owners who claim their dogs smile, but is there any truth to this?

The picture above seems to suggest that dogs can smile and in a funny way too. But why do dogs smile and what makes them open their mouth and show their teeth in such an expressive way? Truth is, (and sorry to burst the bubble), saying a dog smiles is ultimately a form of anthropomorphism.

So, Do Dogs Smile?

Just because a dog shows its teeth and appears to grin does not necessarily mean he is smiling in the same way a dog who is giving a paw is not shaking hands. Humans and dogs are different species, and as such, engage in different behaviors and have different motivations.

So, Do Dogs Smile?

Humans smile to denote positive emotions such as pleasure, joy, and happiness and the smile itself appears to be part of universal language. Do dogs smile for similar reasons? It does not appear as such; otherwise, dogs would be seen smiling all they time as they are quite joyful animals by nature!

So, Do Dogs Smile?

You would, therefore, expect a smile when your dog does something right, when you give him his favorite treat and when he gets to greet his friends at the dog park. You would also expect a mischievous smile when he puts his nose in the most inappropriate places! Instead, smiles in dogs seem to appear quite out of context from a closer observation.

So, Do Dogs Smile?

However, interestingly, it appears that human smiles and dog smiles may ultimately stem for the same underlying reason. Only thing is that in humans, the ultimate reason for the smile may have evolved, when in dogs it appears to have remained the same.

So, Do Dogs Smile?

Let's skip canines for a minute and look at human smiling first.Several biologists seem to agree that the origin of the smile stems from fear. Indeed, primatologist Signe Preuschoft believes that the smile traces back to over 30 million years ago and back in time it was used as a "fear grin" by our closest biological relatives. This behavior was often observed in monkeys and apes in the context of demonstrating to predators they were harmless and meant no threat. A silent, bare teeth display was often observed in tense situations as a pacifying signal, often demonstrated towards a superior partner. In other primate species, the behavior was often employed by an inferior animals for the purpose of demonstrating acceptance for the subordinate role.

So, Do Dogs Smile?
More about this can be read in the book
"Origins of Semiosis: Sign Evolution in Nature and Culture" by Winfried Noth.



Frank McAndrew, a professor of psychology at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois, after doing extensive research on facial expressions, claims that baring teeth is not always a threat. While lips curled back and teeth kept apart denote antagonist intentions, the exposure of teeth kept together always signals submission in the world of primates and the human smile may have evolved from that.

So, Do Dogs Smile?

Our smiles, therefore, may have originated for the purpose of portraying submission, lack of threat and harmlessness. This fear grin appears to be the ancestor of the smile, and consequently, it appears to have evolved into a more sophisticated form that encompasses a variety of emotional states.

So, Do Dogs Smile?

While dogs appear to be smiling, it is erroneous when it comes to semantics to call the teeth display a "smile". Because this grin is submissive in nature, a dog trainer well versed in dog body language or a behavior specialist, refers to this teeth display as a "submissive grin". As in primates, this submissive grin needs not to be confused with a snarl. In this case, the dog lifts the lips to show the fangs and the accompanying body language is hostile. There are several stories of dog owners calling a trainer or dog behaviorist concerned about a submissive grin.

So, Do Dogs Smile?








Dog Facial Expressions & Smiles
DOG FACIAL EXPRESSIONS
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Dog Facial Expressions & Smiles

How to Read a Dog's Mouth?
I've mentioned a tightly closed mouth as a sign of doggy tension. If your dog naturally carries her mouth closed, but the muscles of her lips and muzzle are soft, you need not be concerned. And not all tension is bad from the dog's point of view, of course. You may notice your smiley dog's jaws close up when she draws a bead on a squirrel, for example. In that particular heightened state, your dog probably feels pretty good. The squirrel's opinion may differ.

Dog Facial Expressions & SmilesDog Facial Expressions & Smiles

How you respond to the sight of your dog's mouth going from open to shut should depend on what elicited the change. If your dog is just watching something with close interest, no biggie. But suppose, for example, your dog lunges at other dogs on leash. When his jaw shuts tensely, he's near the limit of his self-control, too close to a dog he finds provocative. Next, the corners of his lips will move forward, and then watch out! Thar he blows. Increase distance from the other dog at the first sign of tension on your dog's face, and save both of you a lot of stress.


Dog Facial Expressions & Smiles

How to Read a Dog's Lips
By the way, it's always worth watching the corners of dogs' lips, the commissures. These are such revealing body parts, and few people know how to read them. A tense dog whose commissures push forward is heading for the offensive. If you see commissures pushed back, think fear. Aggression isn't necessarily imminent, either way, but be aware of what emotional tone you're dealing with.

Finally, a tensely closed mouth may indicate physical discomfort. I know my old, arthritic lady dog is having an especially good day when she doesn't hold her mouth shut but instead lets it open softly on our walks.


Dog Facial Expressions & Smiles

Happy Dog Face
And the happy dog face? Think relaxed, smiley, squinty, blinky. In sleepy contentment, your dog's facial muscles will be soft and quiet, never tense and stiff. In happy excitement, her face may be full of movement. Does somebody want to play? Have her ears mooshed? Or just say hi? Who's got a big old face right on the end of her head?








Dog Facial Expressions & Smiles
DOG RECOGNIZES OUR SMILE
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The study was published in the July issue of the journal Animal Cognition.

We may not be able to wag our tails, but that doesn't mean dogs don't know when we're happy. Our canine companions have become so attuned to living with humans they can recognise smiles, even on strangers, according to researchers in Japan.

Dog Smiles

A new Japanese study has indicated that dogs can recognise smiling faces, which researchers say may have helped them to live with humans. They can also learn to distinguish a smile, even on the faces of some strangers, said the study. The researchers led by Miho Nagasawa of Azabu University trained nine pet dogs using photos of their owners, who were smiling in some of the photos and looking neutral in the others.

Dog Smiles

The dogs were trained to touch their nose to photos of their owner's smiling face. Only five of the dogs completed this training. These dogs were then shown photo pairs of smiling and blank expression faces of unfamiliar people as well as of their owners. When shown photo pairs of either their owner or a stranger who was the same gender as their owner, the dogs selected the smiling faces more often than would be expected if they were randomly choosing a photo.

Dog Facial Expressions & Smiles

"This study has shown that dogs that live closely with humans are also able to recognise positive facial expressions, indicating that these dogs have acquired the social skills helpful to survive. The ability to learn to discriminate human facial expressions must have helped dogs to adapt to human society," Nagasawa's team concluded in the study.








So, Do Dogs Smile?
ANXIETY AND FEAR
SUBORDINATION & HAPPINESS

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Dogs do show happiness outwardly, but not necessarily using their mouths. When a dog feels genuinely at ease, he may actually position his mouth in a way that truly resembles a smile. But he might make such a face when he's not really at ease, too.


Smiling Dog
Body language can be an effective gauge of how at ease a dog feels. Happy dogs have a general looseness to their bodies, and that applies to the mouth area, too. If the sides of your pooch's mouth point slightly higher than the rest of it, that often, but not always, signifies that all is wonderful in your dog's world for the moment. More telling is your dog's tongue. A loose hanging tongue combined with a mouth slightly ajar generally points to a good moods in a doggy, according to the Caring Hands Humane Society website. Although dogs don't actually smile like humans, they sometimes happen to make expressions that look like smiles.


Anxiety and Smiling
A smiley expression in a dog doesn't necessarily indicate happiness. If your dog's mouth is open just a tad, with the sides raised, he may indeed look like he's smiling, but he may actually be anxious, nervous or otherwise in distress. Signs of distress accompanying a stiff smile include heavy panting with the tongue in, whining and chattering teeth. Consult your vet.


Subordination and Smiling
A dog may also give the false impression of smiling in subordinate situations, according to the ASPCA. If a dog is threatened by another animal or human that he feels is higher in ranking, he may attempt to show his subordination by raising his lips in a nonaggressive display. It's a different baring of the teeth than an aggressive one, and the dogs know the difference. It has the appearance of a smile, but the poor pooch is scared. Look out for other "hints" of subordination, including crying, pushed back ears and a hanging head. Make sure the upper portion of the doggie's snout isn't crinkled. That sometimes is a belligerent body language signal to back off.








Teach Your Dog to Smile
TEACH YOUR DOG TO SMILE
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Ways To Teach Your Dog To Show Teeth
If you get your dog used to teeth-brushing on a regular basis, your dog might become more accustomed to showing teeth on command, simply because it's part of the exercise and it's a required behavior in order to get the teeth brushing done.

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That, and the fact that some dogs don't like the taste of the doggie toothpaste and may make a face like this as a reaction to the strange tasting toothpaste. For that matter, introducing any dog-safe human foods to your dog for the first time could lead to a teeth showing behavior. You never know, especially with strange or bitter-tasting foods that are safe for dogs to eat, like some fruits & vegetables. As with most dog tricks - a dog is never too old to learn a new trick. However, the younger your dog is when you start teaching new tricks, the quicker they catch on and the easier it is.

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Some people though will claim their dogs do actually smile with their mouths, indeed, ask them to ask their dog to smile and their dogs will give a wide smile on command. The smile looks genuine, how can that be? In these cases, the dog owners have trained their dogs to smile on cue. How did they do that? Through a training method known as capturing. In capturing, you are basically rewarding behaviors that occur naturally. Because dogs tend to repeat behaviors that are rewarded, the act of smiling can then be put on cue. In these cases, the smile starts really looking genuine; since the dog is gladly doing it in exchange for a reward!

Teach Your Dog to Smile

Instructions #1
1.Encourage the Behavior
When trying to teach your dog to smile on command, encourage the behavior whenever you see it. For some breeds, such as terriers and bully breeds, this is quite easy because they smile all the time. For others, you might have to work to get them to smile. Try gently rubbing his belly, playing ball or anything that gets your dog happy and relaxed.

2.Reward the Behavior
Once you can predict when your dog will smile, begin to reward it. Hand your dog a treat and praise her enthusiastically whenever you see her smiling. Very quickly, you'll begin to notice your dog smiling more and more.

3.Name the Behavior
Just before your dog smiles, give the command you'll use to ask your dog to grin at you. "Smile," "show your teeth," or "say cheese!" tend to work really well. Reward your pup for flashing her pearly whites and praise her at every opportunity. Continue practicing until your dog smiles every time she's asked to.

4.Distraction Proof the Behavior
Start practicing the behavior around distractions and in new places. Give your dog the cue and reward her when she grins. If your dog ignores you, there's too much going on for her to concentrate on what you're asking. Lower the level of distraction until she's comfortable and try again.


Smiling Dog

Instructions #2
1.Find his pleasure points.
Dogs will automatically smile when you find the exact spot that just loves to be scratched.

2.Teach him key phrases.
Both my dogs smile wide when I say things like, "Treat time," "Come here darling darlings" and "Want to go for a walk?"
3.Harass him.
Teasing always gets a reaction.

4.Engage the dog in an activity he loves.

We've all seen dogs break into grins when they are at the dog park, romping on the beach or bounding towards you as you hold out your arms in welcome.

5.Make him drool.
When a scrumptious aroma hits the dog's nose, his lips will usually curl up in anticipation of that treat. Particularly smelly treats include mile turkey sausage, turkey dogs and anything beef.

6.Rub their tummy and ears.
The best way to make a dog smile is to rub them. A good belly or ear rub will make them close their eyes and grin from ear to ear.


Smiling Dog

Instructions #3
1.Begin when your dog is happy and relaxed, i.e., after a play session or when the dog is getting a good scratch. Gently lift the dog's lips on either side of its snout with your fingers from above. Hold a treat in your other hand.

2.Push his upper lip up above his gum line with the thumb and index finger of your dominant hand. Mimic the motion you would make if you were inspecting his gums and teeth. Then say "smile" while you're holding his lip in a smiling position. Put a smile on your face too, to encourage your pet companion to copy you.

3.Repeat this several times, and immediately after each time you help him smile, say "good boy," and reward him with a treat. Consistently do this so he associates curling his lip back with pleasant consequences and is encouraged to repeat the smiling motion.

4.Continue to teach poohie to smile during everyday situations. If you know that your pet companion smiles when he's scratched in a hard-to-reach area, scratch him and say "smile." When he smiles, give him treats and praise. Do this each time a situation emerges in which your dog might naturally smile, and always use the same command to avoid confusing Max.

5.Practice the "smile" command daily for several minutes at a time, and lavish pooh with praise and treats when he smiles on command. Over time, gradually decrease the amount of treats you give Max. Give him treats after every third or fourth smile so he'll continue to smile in the hopes of getting a possible treat.


Smiling Dog and Dog's Face

Instructions #4
1.Simply watch your dog's own behavior.

2.At the very moment that your dog displays some form of teeth baring (maybe a funny smile), then you have to REWARD that behavior and call it something.

3.Be consistent - try to encourage your dog to do it again. And always call that behavior the same thing and always reward it, if you want your dog to do it on cue at some point.










Smiling Dogs: Videos, Pictures, Stories, Photos
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Teach Your Dog to Smile

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