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DOG SMELL & SNIFF
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DOG SMELL and SNIFF















DOG SNIFF and SMELL
















DOG SNIFF and SMELL
Dog and Puppy Sense of Smell
Dog Nose Anatomy, Snout, Odour, Scents
Dog & Puppy Sniffing Possibilities
Dog Memory vs Smell
Dogs Smell Drugs & Cancer
Dog Nose Photos, Images, Pictures
Dog Nose Unique Fingerprint
The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds
Odourless Dog Breeds
How to remove dog smell/odour
How To remove dog bad breath smell


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DOG SMELL
DOG NASAL ANATOMY
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In case you have not noticed:
your dog's world revolves around his nose.

DOG SMELL

Dog's noses are not like our noses. They are so much more! In fact, a dog uses its nose much like humans use their hands. Dog's noses are highly sensitive and when those tissues are dry and chapped, it can be very painful to your pup.

DOG SMELL

A dog's nose consists of a nasal cavity and a pair of nostrils (nares) for inhaling air and odors. The olfactory receptor cells in a dog's nose extend throughout the entire layer of specialized olfactory epithelium found on the ethmo-turbinate bones of the nasal cavity. The olfactory portion of the nasal mucous membrane contains a rich supply of olfactory nerves that ultimately connect with the highly developed olfactory lobe in the dog's brain.

DOG SMELL

Dogs possess an additional olfactory chamber called the vomeronasal organ that also contains olfactory epithelium. The vomeronasal organ, known as Jacobson's organ, consists of a pair of elongated, fluid-filled sacs that open into either the mouth or the nose. It is located above the roof of the mouth and behind the upper incisors. Interestingly, the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity are anatomically distinct from those in the vomeronasal organ.

DOG SMELL DOG SMELL

Each receptor neuron (nerve cell) in the olfactory epithelium of the nasal cavity has a dendrite that ends in a knob with several thin cilia covered by mucus. Receptor neurons in the vomeronasal organ typically lack cilia but have microvilli on the cell surface.

DOG SMELLDOG SMELL

A dog's nose should be cool and moist. A dry and or warm nose indicates an unhealthy and uncomfortable nose. The moisture secreted by mucous glands in the nasal cavity captures and dissolves molecules in the air and brings them into contact with the specialized olfactory epithelium inside the nose.

DOG SMELL

Dogs use sniffing to maximize detection of odors. The sniff is actually a disruption of the normal breathing pattern. Sniffing is accomplished through a series of rapid, short inhalations and exhalations. A bony subethmoidal shelf, which is found below the ethmo-turbinate bones of the nasal cavity, forces inhaled air into the olfactory epithelium. Washing out of the region upon exhalation does not occur due to the nasal pocket created by the bony subethmoidal shelf.

DOG SMELL

The nasal pocket permits the odor molecules that are unrecognizable in a single sniff to accumulate and interact with olfactory receptors. Odor molecules in the olfactory epithelium of the nasal cavity are absorbed into the mucous layer and diffuse to the cilia of receptor neurons. This interaction generates nerve impulses that are transmitted by the olfactory nerves to the dog's brain, which has a well-developed olfactory lobe. This allows the dog to recognize a scent and follow a trail.

DOG SMELLDOG SMELL

Olfactory receptor cells in the vomeronasal organ also send impulses to the region of the hypothalamus associated with sexual and social behaviors. This organ is believed to be important in the detection of pheromones (body scents). This theory could account for the dog's ability to identify and recognize other animals and people.

DOG SMELL

DOG NOSE ANATOMY










DOG SMELL
THE SECRET OF DOG'S SNIFFER
This article proudly presented by
NEWS.SCIENCEMAG.ORG
and
Virginia Morell

After a massive earthquake struck the Sichuan Province of China last year, troops and rescue workers brought in dogs to sift through the rubble. With a scent sensitivity many thousands of times greater than our own, the canines located numerous survivors, even those buried under thick debris for days. Now researchers think that they have figured out a key reason why dogs are such superior sniffers. The study could be useful in building odor-sensitive, artificial nose machines.

DOG SMELL

Scientists have known since the 1950s that dogs and other keen-scented mammals such as rats and rabbits have a specialized anatomical structure in their nasal cavity. Called the olfactory recess, it's a large maze of highly convoluted airways that humans and all other primates lack. In dogs, the recess lies right behind the eyes and takes up almost half of the interior of the nose. Scientists knew that something about the structure allows dogs to sniff odors invisible to humans. "But no one had looked at how air and odors actually flow inside" a dog's nose to reach that recess, says Brent Craven, a mechanical engineer at Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

DOG SMELL

So Craven and his colleagues created a computer model of a canine nose. First, they scanned the nasal airway of a mixed-breed cadaver with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. "We then had to make our model simulate how dogs sniff," says Craven. But because that skill had also never been studied, although it has been in humans and rats, the researchers outfitted seven dogs, including a Pomeranian and a Labrador retriever, with a special muzzle.

DOG SMELL

The device measured their rate of sniffing as they smelled things such as spoonfuls of peanut butter and tuna. Despite the wide range of sizes and weights, "all the dogs sniffed at about the same frequency, five times per second," says Craven. That's the same rate at which they pant. But "we knew they were sniffing and not simply breathing," says Craven, because high-speed videos showed "their nostrils flaring, which happens when they're sniffing, not when they're breathing." The team also mapped the flow of air into the dogs' noses as they sniffed, enabling them to calculate the nostrils' aerodynamic reach.

DOG SMELL

When the computer nose started sniffing, it picked up some surprising results. "First, the simulation showed that when a dog sniffs, each nostril pulls in a separate odor sample," says Craven. Via its olfactory sensors, "the dog can tell which nostril is pulling in the scent," so it knows which direction to go when tracking. Further, the researchers report today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, a dog's nose has a unique nasal airflow pattern, which helps transport odor molecules quickly via a single airway to the olfactory recess. Here, the smell is retained in the maze of scent receptors even after the dog exhales; the odor is not expelled as it is with humans. It's "very similar" to a rat's airway, says Craven, who expects that this pattern will be found in any mammal with a keen sense of smell.

DOG SMELL

"It's a significant study that provides compelling evidence" for why dog noses "make sense of scents in an extremely fine-tuned way," says Marc Bekoff, an ethologist specializing on canids at the University of Colorado, Boulder. That's a necessary step for scientists interested in "artificial nose machines," such as narcotic or explosive detectors, says John Kauer, a neurophysiologist at Tufts University in Boston.








DOG SMELL and SNIFF
DOG's SENSE OF SMELL
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DUMMIES.COM

A dog's nose not only dominates her face, but her brain, as well. In fact, a dog relies on her sense of smell to interpret her world, in much the same way as people depend on their sight. Although this contrasting world view may be hard to imagine, know that your dog interprets as much information as you do. However, she does much of this by smelling an object or animal, not by staring at it.

dog smell

Born to sniff
To gain more respect for your dog's olfactory ability, compare it to a person's nose. Inside the nose of both species are bony scroll-shaped plates, called turbinates, over which air passes. A microscopic view of this organ reveals a thick, spongy membrane that contains most of the scent-detecting cells, as well as the nerves that transport information to the brain. In humans, the area containing these odor analyzers is about one square inch, or the size of a postage stamp. If you could unfold this area in a dog, on the other hand, it may be as large as 60 square inches, or just under the size of a piece of typing paper.

dog smell

Though the size of this surface varies with the size and length of the dog's nose, even flat-nosed breeds can detect smells far better than people. The following table shows the number of scent receptors in people and several dog breeds.

dog smell

A dog's brain is also specialized for identifying scents. The percentage of the dog's brain that is devoted to analyzing smells is actually 40 times larger than that of a human! It's been estimated that dogs can identify smells somewhere between 1,000 to 10,000 times better than nasally challenged humans can.








The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
THE 15 DOG BREEDS WITH
BEST SENSE OF SMELL

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The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
Does Your Dog Stop and Smell the Flowers?
Always! - 52%
Sometimes! - 37%
Never! - 11%


When it comes to our dogs, there are a lot of talents they have that we might consider, well, pretty impressive. (The ability to love us unconditionally, no matter how many times we may get angry when they poop on the carpet as we're housetraining them, is definitely one of them.)

Another super power that's high up on that list is their awesome sense of smell. Of course it's true that some breeds are more well-known for their sniffers than others. We checked in with the American Kennel Club to find out which breeds are known for having the best sense of smell?


The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
Some of the answers might surprise you...

Bloodhound

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
The Bloodhound is one of the oldest dogs that hunt by scent. Its work with law enforcement has been so accurate that evidence trailed by a Bloodhound has been accepted in courts of law.


Beagle

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
Beagles have an excellent nose, and tend to follow it wherever it may take them. They're commonly used as narcotics and agriculture detector dogs with the U.S. Customs & Border Patrol.


German Shepherds

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
German Shepherds are known as the world's leading police and military dogs. They work tirelessly in Search & Rescue and narcotics detection due to their keen sense of smell.


Dachshund

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
Dachshunds are eager hunters that use their sharp sense of smell in above and below-ground work. They were originally bred to hunt badgers.


Harrier

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
The Harrier is known for its strong nose, which was used to hunt hare. The breed has excellent tracking ability, and is a dedicated hunter.


Bassethound

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
Basset Hounds have a naturally strong hunting instinct, and will willingly follow a scent.


Redbone Coonhound

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
The Redbone Coonhound is a natural hunter with a nose that allows him to trail even the faintest of scents.


Bluetick Coonhoun

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
The Bluetick Coonhound is a steady, determined hunter that can stay on the most intricate of tracks. Like the Redbone Coonhound, the Bluetick can also follow very faint scents.


English Foxhound

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
The English Foxhound's good nose and determination make him a great fox hunter.


Labrador Retriever

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
Labs excel at all types of detection work because of their noses. They are widely used as Search and Rescue dogs, and have even been trained to sniff out cancer from patients' breath.


Black and Tan Coonhound

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
The Black and Tan Coonhound is a determined, persistent hunter that will stay on a track... no matter what the terrain or conditions are.


Treeing Walker Coonhound

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
The Treeing Walker Coonhound is a hot-nosed hunter that's great at following scents.


Golden Retriever

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
Golden Retrievers use their sense of smell in a variety of detection work, and they excel as Search and Rescue and allergy alert dogs.


Scottish Terrier

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
The Scottie is an avid vermin hunter, using its strong sense of smell to dig and find its prey.


Belgian Malinois

The 15 Dog breeds with best sense of smell
The Belgian Malinois is a popular military working dog that uses its keen nose to detect explosives.








DOG SMELL and SNIFF
DOG's NOSE FUNCTION
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DOGICA.COM

The dog can smell and he can sniff.

dog smell

A dog resorts to sniffing not only to communicate with other dogs and gather information from pheromones released by them, but to also identify weaker smells such as diluted or hidden substances. The septal organ is the most sensitive part of the dog's nose and it is responsible for initiating sniffing behaviour, which is different from regular breathing patterns.

DOG SNIFF and SMELL

The dog's moist nose is typical of animals with an acute sense of smell as opposed to humans, who have dry noses. According to Dr. Caroline Coyle, moist noses may attract odour molecules and keep them in the vicinity of the nasal openings.

DOG SNIFF and SMELL

Another organ which plays a very important role in the dog's excellent sense of smell is the vomeronasal (or Jacobson's) organ. Due to its location, smells can reach it via the nose or mouth. They are channelled to this organ by a slow opening and closing motion of the mouth, which allows for a more accurate analysis of smells.

DOG SNIFF and SMELL

So amazing is the dog's sense of smell, that it is more accurate than a lot of odour detecting devices on the market!








DOG SMELL and SNIFF
DOG's UNIQUE NOSE
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DOGICA.COM

Your dog's nose has a pattern of ridges and dimples that, in combination with the outline of its nostril openings, make up a nose print believed to be as individual and unique as a human being's fingerprints. Companies even register nose prints as a way of identifying and helping to locate lost or stolen dogs, a system that is now being used by kennel clubs around the world.

dog nosedog nose

If you want to take a nose print from your dog just for fun, it's quite simple: Wipe your dog's nose with a towel to dry its surface. Pour food coloring onto a paper towel and lightly coat your pet's nose with it. Then hold a pad of paper to her nose, making sure to let the pad's sides curve around to pick up impressions from the sides of the nose, as well.

dog sniff and smell

You may have to try a couple of times until you get the right amount of food coloring and the right amount of pressure to produce a print in which the little patterns on the nose are clear.

dog sniff and smelldog sniff and smell

The food coloring is nontoxic and is easily removed. Never use ink or paint, or you may have to explain to your friends why your dog has a green or blue nose.

dog sniff and smell








DOG SMELL and SNIFF
DOG's vs HUMAN's SMELL
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DUMMIES.COM

Scent-Detecting Cells
in People and Dog Breeds


DOG SNIFF and SMELL


Generally dogs have an olfactory sense approximately 100,000 to 1,000,000 times more acute than a human's.

DOG SMELL and SNIFF

A Bloodhound, (The dog with the highest sense of smell) has a 10,000,000 to 100,000,000 higher ability than a human.

DOG SMELL and SNIFF

As you've undoubtedly noticed, you and your dog have very different notions of what smells nice. To your dog, something could smell quite wonderful. But to you, in a word, it's yucky. And vice versa.

DOG SMELL and SNIFF


Human's smell
Different smells are captured by the olfactory nerve, which receptors are found within the lining of our nasal cavities. This nerve ends in the area immediately below the brain's frontal lobes, which makes it very short. Smell may influence our behaviour, for example, a newborn baby moves his mouth towards the source of the odour of his mother's milk, ignoring other odours. At this age our brain functions don't differ much from the brain functions of other animals, so we may assume that smell is as important to a newborn baby as it is to a two week old puppy. However, as the infant grows his sense of smell becomes less important whereas other senses, especially sight, become more important. With dogs, things evolve quite differently.


Dog's smell
Scent is, by far, more developed in dogs than in humans. A dog's nostrils can be used independently from each other. Dogs have much larger olfactory bulbs and possess around 220 million scent receptors in their nose as opposed to man, who only has 5 million. Dogs have a much larger area of nasal membrane than us. Through scent, they gather a tremendous amount of information from the environment, other dogs, people, places, other animals and can learn to detect drugs such as cocaine and cannabis, detect explosives and cancerous cells. They can even detect a seizure in a human before it occurs, and detect a variety of substances at concentrations one thousand to one million times lower than we can.

DOG SMELL and SNIFF








DOG SMELL and SNIFF
ODOURLESS DOG BREEDS
This article proudly presented by
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Alaskan Klee Kai (minimal)
Alaskan Malamute (minimal)
Australian Silky Terrier (little \ none)
Australian Labradoodle (little \ none)
Basenji (little \ none)
Bichon Frise (little \ none)
Belgian Shepherd - Groenendael (minimal)
Belgian Shepherd - Laekenois (minimal)
Belgian Shepherd - Malinois (minimal)
Belgian Shepherd - Tervuren (minimal)
Bolognese (little \ none)
Boston Terrier (little \ none)
Bracco Italiano (little \ none \ moderate)
Bull Terrier (minimal)
Bull Terrier, Miniature (minimal)
Cavoodle (minimal)
Chinese Crested (minimal)
Chinese Shar - Pei (little \ none \ moderate)
Cockerpoo (little \ none \ average)
Coton de Tulear (little \ none)
Dalmatian (little \ none)
Goldendoodle (little \ none \ average)
Greyhound, Italian (little \ none)
Havanese (little \ none)
Japanese Spitz (little \ none)
Keeshond (little \ none)
Labradoodle (little \ none \ average)
Lhasa Apso (little \ none)
Lowchen (little \ none)
Maltese (little \ none)
Morkie (little \ none)
Norwegian Elkhound (minimal)
Papillon (little \ none)
Phalene (little \ none)
Pomeranian (little \ none)
Poodle, Miniature (little \ none)
Poodle, Standard (little \ none)
Poodle, Toy (little \ none)
Samoyed (little \ none)
Schnauzer, Giant (little \ none)
Schnauzer, Miniature (little \ none)
Schnauzer, Standard (little \ none)
Schnoodle (minimal)
Shetland Sheepdog (little \ none)
Siberian Husky (little \ none)
Tibetan Spaniel (little \ none)
Tibetan Terrier (little \ none)
Yorkiepoo (minimal)
Yorkshire Terrier (little \ none)

DOG SMELLdog odour








The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds
THE 10 STINKIEST DOG BREEDS
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BassetHound

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Prone to bloat and gassiness, the Basset Hound is also prone to dog odor. Shampooing is an option, but too many baths will dry out their skin.


Cocker Spaniel

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Although this breed (both the American and English varieties) are plagued with several genetic faults, one that isn't commonly known is their overwhelming dog odor.


Beagle

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Another hound on the list, the Beagle is one who is prone to a particular doggy odor that seems to permeate the entire yard.


Pug

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Although the Pug has a short coat, the folds on their faces need careful cleaning to keep from dirt and infection. These breeds are also prone to extreme gassiness.


Bloodhound

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Between the long floppy ears that need routine cleaning and the oiled coat that retains a constant dog scent, Bloodhounds are a laid back potpourri of scents and the only scents that don't seem to interest them.


Yorkshire Terrier

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Between their coats that need constant grooming and the genetic predisposition to tooth decay, a Yorkie needs special care to keep smelling like a rose.


English Bulldog

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

It’s commonly known this dog is riddled with skin problems, which may contribute to some not so pleasant smelling fur. But these barrel chested dogs also emit lethal flatulence that may bring a grown man to tears.


Chinese Shar Pei

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Shar Pei's also suffer from hereditary skin ailments, that have nothing to do with their many folds. Owners need to be diligent in cleaning this breed, the folds may begin to reek if not cleaned properly.


Boxer

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Boxers are notorious for the noxious gasses they emit. Other than their room clearing abilities, the boxer doesn't have any other type of "doggy" odor.


Saint Bernard

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

These dogs are notorious droolers, which get down into their coat, causing it to smell. Also prone to skin problems and gassiness, the St. Bernard could be considered a triple threat.


Shepherd

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

And finally, most of Shepperd breeds are stinky as hell, while you grow them up at home.








DOG SMELL and SNIFF
WHY DO DOGS ROLL
IN SMELLY THINGS?

This article proudly presented by
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Have you ever caught your dog rolling around in poop? Believe it or not, this behavior is quite common and very natural. Many believe it's instinctual behavior, harkening back to the days when your dog's wild ancestors would mask their scent to help them sneak up on their prey. Wolves, for example, have been observed rolling in animal carcasses or the droppings of plant-eating animals, to cover up their own smell during the hunt.

dog smelldog smelldog smell

A few theories...
Here's a perfect example of something that smells nice to you but not to your dog: the perfumes used in dog shampoo. You may find them pleasant, but many dogs dislike their odor. As a result, as soon as your just bathed dog gets the chance, he finds something that smells more acceptable to him: garbage, dog feces, animal carcasses and starts rolling around in it.

DOG SNIFF and SMELL

Here's another related theory that also conjures up the pre domesticated past of canines: wild dogs may have rolled around in smelly things to "tell" their pack mates where they've been and what they've encountered in their adventures. It's his way of saying, "Hey, smell where I've been!"

dog smell and sniff

What should you do about this behavior?
The important thing to remember is that rolling around in smelly things is a natural and normal behavior for dogs no matter how the results may strike you (or your nose). Of course, that doesn't mean that you have to live with a smelly dog. Though you shouldn't punish this behavior, there are steps you can take to discourage it. If your dog rolls around in his own feces, immediately clean up after him in the yard. When you're out walking your dog, keep him on a short leash to prevent him from rolling around in another dog's poop or other smelly things you both might encounter. To discourage and ultimately stop him from rolling around in offensively odorous things, you could try to pair an unpleasant experience with his action. This can take the form of squirting him with a water bottle or using a citronella spray collar that can be operated via remote control (dogs absolutely hate the smell of citronella). If you use this method, make sure you squirt him as soon as he starts rolling.

dog smell and sniff

You can also try anything your dog finds annoying, like making a loud and sudden noise. The key here is to be consistent and to start the "annoyance" as soon as he starts to roll around in something smelly. Once he starts to associate rolling around in smelly things with the unpleasant experience, chances are this behavior will quickly stop. And you can breathe easier.

dog smell and sniff

While you most undoubtedly love your dog (or dogs), living with their occasional bad odor doesn't have to be something you put up with. By being proactive after you follow the steps below, you'll be able to keep new bad dog smells from taking over your house. And then you can really enjoy just the positives of having a pet. So here are some tried and true methods for getting rid of dog smells in various places in your home.

Dog Smells in General - The Internet is scattered with remedies and tips for getting rid of dog smells. While some are helpful, many may end up making a bigger mess than you started with. With that in mind, if you stick to tried and true methods (some explained below), you'll have a lot less trouble in the long run. The biggest thing to remember is that a good defense is a strong offense. In other words, by being proactive and going after the problem of dog smell before it becomes too strong, you have a fighting chance of having a pet and a nice smelling house.

Dog Smells in Carpets - For getting dog smells out of carpet, there are various things you can try. Basically, you want something that will get the oil and hair out of the carpet as this is the source of the dog smell. A normal carpet shampooer may not be enough. First, try covering the floor with baking soda, letting it sit for at least 24 hours. Then, carefully sweep up the baking soda. You may have to repeat this process. After one or two applications, use a carpet shampoo machine with special cleaners that will help get rid of the smell for good. For the specific smell of urine in the carpet, you're going to have to get a little more aggressive. Using a mixture of water and vinegar (mostly water), you should drench the area thoroughly. Use a towel to tap the area dry. Then apply the baking soda (once it's dry) and let that sit for a while. After that, follow the procedure above. Rinse and repeat as needed.

Dog Smells in Upholstery Getting dog smell out of couches, chairs and other upholstery is a little more difficult than getting it out of carpet. This is because of the odd shape of furniture - at least compared to the large, flat surface of the floor. Still, there are some things you can do to get the smell of dogs out of your upholstery. Using a specially formulated mix to get out the smell is usually your best bet. You can still try the baking soda approach, but you'll need a hand vac or a canister vacuum with a long hose. Either way, getting dog smell out of upholstery is difficult but not impossible.

Dog Smells in Vacuum Cleaners -, change the bags, sprinkle baking soda on your carpet and vacuum it up into the new bag. If you live in a temperate climate, leaving the vacuum outdoors for 24 hours will help. Be sure to replace the bag again. You might also try placing a dryer sheet in your vacuum, which may help with the smell. To truly get rid of the smell, you should replace the bag after every use so the dog hair and other smelly bits don't settle and begin to affect the smell of the vacuum. Another idea is to squirt a few puffs of perfume on a couple tissues and suck them up with the vacuum. Using the other methods described, you should have no problems keeping your vacuum smelling great all the time.

Dog Smells in the Garage - Removing dog smell from your garage might be one of the most simple places to get rid of it. You'll still want to be careful about not using harmful chemicals to get rid of the smell, but generally you'll have a little more leeway in working on getting rid of the problem in your garage. That said, most of the suggestions above hold merit. In addition just airing out the garage and keeping it dry and clean of dog hair can help keep the smell at bay.

Dog Smells in Bedding - If the bedding doesn't have sentimental value, sometimes it's easiest to just get rid of the old bedding, replacing it with fresh bedding occasionally. If you are working with something that has a deep odor but you want to keep it for whatever reason, be prepared to spend some money on special soap to help get rid of the smells. Many washes later, if the material holds up, you should be able to get rid of most of the smell. That said, you might want to try having a few sets of bedding on hand and wash it every few days to keep the smell away and stop it from building up over time. Sometimes an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.








DOG SMELL and SNIFF
MAKE YOUR DOG SMELL BETTER
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First of all - it could be YOU who is hypersensitive to the smell of dog. Have your dog checked out first and then decide!

It may be simple to just state that dogs smell because they're dirty, but it sometimes goes beyond this. Beyond just being dirty, there are many physical problems that could cause your dog to smell. Here are some of the reasons for dog smells:

Body Odor - If you haven't given your dog a bath in a while, especially if they're outdoors often, normal body odor can start to become a problem.

Sweat - If your dog is active, they're going to sweat just like you would. There's no doggy deodorant that will stop this, but there are things that can be done.

Bodily Functions - Dogs have to remove waste from their bodies just like humans. While it's not a comfortable topic for some, some of the waste "sticks around" and can cause really awful smells.

DOG SMELL and SNIFFDOG SMELL and SNIFF

There are other reasons your dog may smell, but these are the basic and most common reasons. The good news is that taking care of these problems isn't that difficult. In fact, we're going to next take a look at removing dog smells from your household. Then, we'll take a look at removing smells from your dog itself. At that point, you should have a good idea on how to keep your dog and your house smelling fresh and clean.

Odor of dog doesn't quite top the list of people's favorite scents. In fact, dog odor can often cause people to think twice about either owning a dog or letting the dog spend time indoors or in a car with them. Dog odors can be many and varied, including bad breath, flatulence, poorly maintained fur and stepping or rolling in do-do.

Ultimately, no matter how cute, a smelly dog is hard to spend time around, so it's vital to get him to smell great again. Here are some key doggy odor checking and arresting activities you can put into action.

Dog stinks, sniffs, smells

Ascertain the cause of your dog's odor. If it's evident to you, then you can go straight to the cause and seek ways to remedy it (see following sections). For example, a dog that hasn't had a bath for over a month but has spent a lot of time rolling around in the back yard dirt might simply need a bath. On the other hand, a very clean dog that has thoroughly bad breath might have medical reasons for emitting the bad odors. First up, check the dog for obvious problems, such as having rolled in feces, decaying matter or anything else stinky; dogs like to roll in things that don't smell sweet to us because it camouflages their own smell and it's just a fact of life that some dogs enjoy doing this more than others. If your initial check doesn't reveal anything, try a bath. (make sure you do not get soap and/or water in dogs ears.)

If that doesn't help, here are some other common issues:
If your dog has bad breath or flatulence problems, it's time to visit the vet. Hopefully you've been getting six monthly or yearly check-ups already but this will require a special visit to see if the source of the odor has any serious underlying medical issues. Problems that might exist include kidney disease (persistent urine smell) or diabetes (sweet or sugary breath), liver troubles (fetid odor, yellowish eyes/gums, swollen abdomen and vomiting), bad teeth or gums or infected ears. Infected anal sacs can also cause bad odor, if this is the cause, you'll need to learn to empty them.

dog and puppy infograms, infographics - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!

Skin or coat conditions such as seborrhea, chyletiella or other conditions that need medical intervention can be another cause of doggy odor. This may not be evident to you until after you've shampooed the dog and there is still no improvement in odor. Again, see the vet straight away for advice and treatment.


How to remove dog odour

Avoid spraying perfume, Febreeze®, or any other scented products on your dog. These only mask the odor and doesn't remove it. They could also mask the deeper problem if there is one. Moreover, most things you might want to spray on your dog are probably highly unsuitable or even unsafe for the dog.

Bathing
dog smell

For a dog who has rolled in something smelly, hasn't been bathed for a while or who looks dirty, a bath is a good start to fixing his bad odor issue. Buy some dog shampoo (conditioner is optional depending on the type of coat). See if you can find one that is formulated to get rid of odors rather than simply trying to cover them up. If your dog is suffering from a skin condition, such as yeast overgrowth, ask your vet for an appropriate medicated shampoo to use.

Wet your dog completely starting from the top of the head to the end of the tail.

Squirt some shampoo into your hands. Start to lather from the top of your dog's neck to the end of its tail. Shampoo the outside of the ears, the legs, the chest, belly, featherings (if any), and the rest of the body. Be careful to avoid your dog's eyes.

Rinse the shampoo out of the coat. Avoid water entering the ears.

Repeat this process for conditioner, if you choose.

Let your dog shake the water off. Then, using either a dog hairdryer or a towel, dry your dog. It's best if you can prevent your dog from rolling until he has dried completely.

Dry your dog as soon as possible. The wet dog smell that people complain about is mainly caused by bacteria that feed on a dog's natural skin oil. Like so many other types of bacteria, they thrive in a warm, moist environment. The best way to control the problem is to give your dog regular baths and to keep your dog dry as much as possible between baths. (Keep in mind that bathing your dog too frequently will remove too much skin oil, leading to health problems.) Ask your vet for advice, according to the climate, long/short hair etc.


Grooming
Dog smell remove odor

Infected ears and a poorly maintained coat can be contributing causes to doggy odor.

Clean your dog's ears to avoid or correct wax buildup. Very dirty ears may be red or swollen, and may attract ear mites. Buy either ear wipes or ear cleanser (such as Oxyfresh Pet Ear Cleaner).

Wipe the ear where wax is evident (generally a dark brown color) and through the different crevasses in the ear.

Squirt the solution in the dog's ear and rub the ear in a circular motion.

Take a cotton ball, place it right under the ear flap, and tip your dog's head toward it. The solution will be absorbed by the cotton ball.

Take a clean cotton ball and gently wipe away the remaining solution.

Brush or comb your dog daily. This will remove all debris and build-up of dirt, bacteria, etc. Back-comb to help remove more loose hairs - a wet comb can help to pick up more loose material.

Make sure your dog has good dental hygiene. Bad teeth lead to bad breath, after all, imagine how your mouth would smell if you didn't brush your teeth for months on end.

Find a dog toothbrush suitable for the size of your dog's mouth. You can buy these at any pet store, in pet catalogs, or from your veterinarian. Find a suitable toothpaste for dogs (don't ever use human toothpaste). Dog toothpastes are often flavored with such tasty flavors as beef or poultry.

Squirt a pea-sized amount of dog toothpaste on the toothbrush.

Gently move your dog's lip upward so you can see its teeth.

Brush all the teeth inside the mouth for about one minute. Be sure to get both sides of each tooth.

Repeat at least twice a week.

Buy some mildly scented doggie cologne; squirt your pooch a couple of times for a short-term fix. However, as noted earlier, this is a cover-up, not a solution and should only be used if you know it's a safe product for dogs and it's just in addition to all the health checks, grooming and good dietary habits.


Diet and Flatulence
DOG SMELL

Look to your dog's diet. If your dog isn't eating a healthy, natural diet, then odor may be caused by the unhealthy food your dog is ingesting. This can be one of the most common, yet underrated cause of bad dog smell.

Shift your dog off cheap and low nutrition food onto better quality natural brands. Many cheap brands contain corn, which is indigestible and can be the cause of the dog odor, dulled coat, gas, and bad dog breath. Try switching to a homemade diet. High quality natural brands may also be available at good pet stores or online.

Be aware that the soy content of some dog food products can be responsible for flatulence in dogs. Some brands have up to 25 percent soy content; read the label and change to a brand that has none or at least a lot less.

Most dogs are lactose intolerant. If you're adding anything to your dog's diet that includes lactose, flatulence may well be the end result. Remove the lactose source and things should improve. On the other hand, natural yogurt with good bacteria in it can benefit some dogs (ask your vet for advice first).

If air quality worsens when changing food, this is a sign you've changed over the food too quickly. Provide a more gradual transition period between foods so that the intestinal bacteria can acclimatize to the new food. A good transition period is three days, reducing the old food by a third each day.

Give your dog some carrot to chew at mealtimes. This will help to clean his teeth. Dry food can also help but look for good quality dry food.

Help your dog's digestion system work more efficiently with the addition of whole grains such as cooked brown rice. Better digestion means better doggy breath and less (or no) flatulence.

Stop the table scraps. The variety of food from the table isn't necessarily ideal for Fido and can contribute to bad breath and flatulence, as well as unbalanced nutrition. Unless, of course, you're eating a thoroughly healthy diet yourselves!

Check that your dog isn't rummaging through the household refuse. If so, stop this from happening, as Fido might be eating bad food, as well as getting covered in more stinky stuff.

Notice your dog's appetite. Greedy dogs take in more food, which means more to ferment and more to make flatulence with. Stop tempting him with table scraps or too many treats. Buy smaller food bowls and be strong about not over-feeding your dog. (If your dog has a lessened appetite, you should take it to the vet.)

Take your dog walking and playing regularly. Exercise is a good way of reducing flatulence.


Bedding
Remove dog smell from house & bed

Keep your dog's bedding clean, free of fleas and dirt and you'll help maintain a fresher dog. Place all cloth bedding, crate bumpers, and crate covers in the washing machine. Wash on cold. Be careful when adding fabric softeners, as they may irritate your dog's skin. If you want to add something, either use gentle detergent or vinegar.

Transfer items to the dryer (set on low heat), or set them out to air dry.

Rinse your dog crate or pet cot/bed off with a hose. If it is really dirty, scrub it out using a sponge or toothbrush and mild biodegradable dish-soap.

Repeat weekly or biweekly depending on your situation.


MAKE YOUR DOG SMELL BETTER

TIPS TO MAKE YOUR DOG SMELL EVEN BETTER
Be sure that it's not the products you're adding to your dog's coat that are causing any odor problems in conjunction with the dog's natural odor.

Rub baking soda through your dog's fur after a bath. This will not impart any odor but will soak up bad smells, leaving your dog smelling lovely. Then lightly brush off the excess, so you don't get powder marks all over the house!

For dog beds with removable covers, try slipping some lavender buds between the cover and bed for a clean, fresh scent. Doing so may also have a calming effect on your dog!

A dog's odor is controlled basically by how well its liver clears toxins. To help a dog's liver do its job, you can give the dog N-Acetyl Cysteine or NAC; 400mg a day. For dogs who really smell bad, you will be amazed at the result.

For skin problems, in some areas it's possible to see a vet dermatologist. This might help your dog if the odor source is skin or coat related.

Chewing on approved-for-dogs dry leather bones can help to keep the teeth clean. Tug of war games can help too, as their teeth rub on the rope in a manner a little similar to dental floss for humans.

There are medical products that can reduce dog flatulence. Speak to your vet about them.

Make sure you have professional help when first cleaning your dog's anal glands. Mistakes can lead to serious infections.

Human toothpaste can result in digestive problems.

Some dogs are naturally smellier than others. You may just need to get used to the fact, especially as your dog ages and if it has a longer coat or is bigger in build.

It could be you who is hypersensitive to the smell of dog. Have your dog checked out first and then decide!

Avoid feeding your dog: chocolate, onions, grapes, raisins, tomatoes, avocados, nuts, and foods containing caffeine or xylitol! These can be harmful and poisonous to your dog.

Smell of Dog Urine on Pets - the best way to make sure your pet doesn't smell like urine is to groom them so there isn't too much hair around the area of their genitals. Then, just make sure you bathe them at regular intervals, using a mild shampoo to make them smell great and also help with their skin and coat. Basic dog grooming should keep the smell of urine off your dog.

Mange Smell on Dogs - to rid your dog of the smells of mange, you'll want to make sure they're taking the appropriate medication. Then, after checking with your vet, make sure you keep them bathed as often as possible. Keeping them clean and using mildly scented shampoos can help keep the smell of mange at bay, making it a bit more manageable for all involved. With something serious like mange, you will want to consult a veterinarian to get specific instructions on what you should do.

Wet Dog Fish Smell - when dogs get wet, they can take on a "fishy" smell. To get rid of this, make sure you clean and wash your dog (use shampoo) if they've spent a lot of time in a pond, lake or creek. This not only helps with removing the fish smell, it also leaves them smelling great. Dogs are naturally attracted to water most of the time so if you live near a source of water, be prepared to keep your dog bathed often if you don't want to deal with the "wet dog" smell.

Skunk Smell on Dogs - if you need to remove the skunk smell from a dog, first of all - good luck! Seriously, this may be one of the most difficult things you have to deal with as a pet owner. Fortunately, there are many methods you can use to deal with the problem. Whatever you do, don't bring the dog into your house, as the smell can seep into many surfaces in your home. The basics constitute of giving the dog a bath. What you use for soap will determine if you get rid of the smell or not.

You don't want to use something that harms your pet, so use a mixture of hydrogen peroxide, a small amount of mild dish soap, a quarter cup of baking soda, and water. This mixture should foam right away which is when you want to use it on ONLY the affected area on your dog. Rinse with normal tap water, pat dry and repeat. It's good to mention that you should be wearing old, disposable clothes and gloves when doing this so you don't get exposed to the smell yourself.

Brush Your Pet Often - By making brushing your pet a daily or nightly part of your routine, you can help control the spread of hair in your home, which is one of the biggest causes of dog smell permeating homes.

Frequent Baths - While this one seems obvious, pet owners sometimes will let their pet slide a few days on their bath. This may not be a problem at first, but the more you get into this habit, the harder it is going to be for you to control the bad dog smells in your home.

Carpet Deodorizer - While vacuuming daily is important, adding a carpet deodorizer occasionally will help keep the dog smell at bay. There are many great products that are made for this, but occasionally using baking soda alone will help suck up the smell as well.

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dog smell
WHAT DOGS CAN SMELL
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Let's face it: as a species, we've ruined nature. We've melted the ice caps with our spray-on deodorant; turned the rainforests into barren sludge; and even taken the atom-the building block of the universe-and turned it into a weapon.

DOG SMELL and SNIFF

But nature still seems to love us. This can be shown by the incredible number of ways dogs can help us, with their amazing sense of smell.


1. Bees

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

In case you didn't already know the bees are dying. But dogs have come to save the day: since the 1970s, bee keepers have trained dogs to find diseased beehives before they have a chance to infect other, healthier swarms.

The dogs can do this simply by tracking the scent of the bacteria that causes the disease known as "American Foulbrood" - a process which allows beekeepers to inspect up to 100 colonies in 45 minutes, rather than the two days it would take a human to do the same work.


2. DVDs

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

Dogs can be taught to detect the material polycarbonate, a key component of all DVD disks. They can thereby help to bust the massive DVD counterfeiting trade in places like Southeast Asia. Indeed, on their first raid, two of these dogs found a pile of pirated DVDs worth over $3 million.
The success of this single raid managed to annoy the Malaysian DVD pirates so much that they offered a $30,000 bounty for the deaths of the dogs.


3. Drowned Bodies

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

Water search dogs are often used by police in the USA to locate and recover drowned corpses. But how exactly could a dog smell a body through all that water? Well, the scent of drowned bodied is released into the water currents, which then end up being released into the air. The dogs which can work either from the shore, from a boat, or even while swimming in the water track this scent to its strongest point, the body itself.


4. Ambushes and Vietcong Equipment

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

During the Vietnam War, the US military used scout dogs to detect enemy soldiers. This doesn't sound too impressive, since we all know that dogs can smell humans. But the dogs were also able to detect tunnels, weapons, and booby traps saving hundreds of US soldiers lives in the process. Since barking would give away their position, the dogs were taught alternative ways of showing that danger might be afoot. Some learned to raise the hairs on their necks; others crossed their ears, and at least one dog would walk on its hind legs when it smelled something sinister.


5. Diabetes

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

We've recently seen how some dogs can predict the onset of a seizure. Dogs can also be trained to alert their diabetic owners whenever their blood sugar rises to dangerous levels. A few of them can even in the case of a diabetic attack run and fetch an insulin kit. If only they had opposable thumbs, perhaps they'd prep the syringe for us as well.


6. Whale Poop

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

Whale poop is often analyzed by scientists to monitor the health of whales, as it often contains important information about their diet. But there's one problem: the poop sinks within half an hour of leaving the whale, meaning that scientists need to get their hands on it as soon as possible.

For this reason, one group has started training dogs to detect the poop. The dogs can trace its scent from a distance of more than one mile (1.6 km), and lead scientists to the smelly treasure. When the dog has detected the whale waste, he points out the location to the boat captain by either leaning left or right, or twitching his left or right ear.


7. Bed Bugs

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

The modern age of widespread air travel is causing a near apocalyptic surge in the number of cases of bed bug infestations. In response to this, pest control services have sprung up whereby in exchange for a hefty fee a dog will sweep a house for bed bugs, letting you know before you purchase a new property what sort of problems you might have to deal with. Apparently, the accuracy rate is as high as 96%.


8. Minerals and Ores

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

The government in Finland financed a program that taught dogs to detect valuable sulphide containing rocks. When the rocks break apart, they release a smell not unlike rotting eggs, which the dogs can track easily. So easily, in fact, that, during one hunt a dog found a deposit of "great economic significance."


9. Ovulation in Cows

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

No need for wining and dining: cows are most often impregnated via artificial insemination. But because bull semen is so expensive, many farmers can only afford to artificially inseminate the cows when they're definitely ready to get pregnant. Time it badly, and there would be an awkward conversation with the bank manager down the line. As a result, some farmers have started using specially-trained dogs to detect when a cow is in heat a job some dogs are so good at, they even know before the bulls do.


10. Cancer

What Dogs Can Smell and Sniff

Cancer stinks in more ways than one. Cancer cells have a distinctive smell that can be picked up by the super sensitive noses of dogs. In patients with lung or breast cancer, it's known that these waste products are exhaled whenever a patient breathes, so a group of dogs have been trained to sniff people's breath and alert them if they smell cancer.

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DOG MEMORY
DOG MEMORY vs SMELL
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Most people think dogs use their sense of smell for everything, but actually dogs use a whole range of senses when solving problems. A new study from Duke University's Canine Cognition Centre suggests that memory may be more important than smell when dogs are trying to find a hidden treat. The team used data from more than 500 dog owners around the world via their online website - Dognition. The scientists wanted to test whether their findings matched those provided by pet owners. As part of this study, published in PLOS ONE, dog owners were tasked with a number of games to play with their dog, these were the same games conducted in the laboratory. One of the tests involved the dogs watching as their owners hid food under one of two cups.

DOG MEMORY

Then, when the dog's vision was obscured, the owner moved the treat to the other cup. The hypothesis being that if dogs relied on their sense of smell alone, they should still have been able to find the treat. However, the data from this Citizen Science project found that most dogs went to the cup where they last saw the food, suggesting they relied more on memory than smell. Analysis of the data also showed that each dog uses a unique set of cognitive skills: some are good communicators, while others have better memories and some are better at taking their owner's perspective.

How Long is Dog Memory Span, Short-Term, Long-Term

Because there are many factors that make up dog,s intelligence, the profile illustrates which factors are used predominately by your dog. For example, the profile shows how cunning your pooch is, what his memory is like, and even where he rates on the empathy level. Hence, this really is a useful tool when it comes to training your dog and understanding why certain tasks maybe more challenging than others. Where a profile shows Fido has a poor memory, for example, that can help the frustrated owner who may not understand why their dog just "isn't getting it" when it comes to teaching a new behaviour or changing a behaviour.

READ FULL DOG MEMORY STUDY








dog smell
SMELLS THAT REPEL DOGS
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There are occasions when a dog's superior sniffing abilities are literally life-saving. However, his tendency to chase smells outdoors, trample plant beds and dig holes are much less pleasing, and if he manages to escape next door, it could quickly lead to a frosty atmosphere between you and the neighbors. Happily, there are a few pantry items that will put him off the scent.

Chili Pepper
Chili pepper is sold in practically every supermarket, essential for a great chilli con carne, and absolutely hated by your pooch. Commercial dog repellents often contain chilli because the capsaicin that gives the pepper its spice irritates the dog's nose, eyes and throat. However, don't bother to buy a branded repellent when sprinkling chilli powder on your lawn or newly planted flower beds will do the trick. If you want to keep him off furniture or rugs, make a spray by dissolving the powder in water. It is non-toxic for your pup, but if there are children around, make sure you don't put chilli powder in places where little hands can come into direct contact with it.

Citrus
The scents of lemon, lime, tangerine and grapefruit are uplifting, and in aromatherapy the citrus oils are among those that energize people. Your puppy takes a very different view of them: they're a horrible stink, as far as he's concerned. Add squeezed citrus juice to water and spray your furniture. Alternatively, hide pieces of citrus fruit peel beneath a cushion or around your yard, although you will need to remember to replace the peel once it has lost its scent. Reader's Digest suggests mixing used coffee grounds with orange peel as a way of both repelling dogs and fertilizing your plants. Again, citrus repellents are non-toxic for your dog.

Vinegar
Vinegar is a rather less fragrant repellent, unless you love the smell. Your pooch certainly won't like it. You probably won't want your home to smell like a pickle factory, so while mixing vinegar with water and spraying it around the house may keep your dog away, it may have the same effect on your friends. It's more suited to outdoor use, but don't pour vinegar straight onto the ground around your plants because it will kill them. The website Garden Know How advises soaking cotton balls or old rags in vinegar and placing them around your yard.

Ammonia and Mothballs
These are both strong smelling substances, however, compared with the other homemade repellents these are more dangerous. You should only use ammonia in a well-ventilated area if you're using it indoors because the smell is an irritant for many people. Use it in the same way as the vinegar by soaking cotton balls in it and placing them in outdoor areas. Mothballs may have kept granny's clothes free of holes and people of a certain age can probably remember the smell. Dogs don't like them, but if you do use mothballs, make sure they're well hidden because they'll poison your dog if he discovers them and eats them. Mothballs also poison people, so if you also have young children around, mothballs are the least safe of the dog repellent solutions.

Perfume, Air Freshener and Disinfectant.
Actually the alcohol that is used to carry the active ingredients irritates their nose.








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WHAT DOG SMELL BEFORE PEEING
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Being the Big Dog
Regardless of how big your dog is, or how big he thinks he is, he has an instinctual need to show dominance over other dogs. If he has to pee anyway, why not multitask and use that opportunity to position himself as the dog in charge? When he sniffs where another dog has enjoyed potty time, your pooch is likely to pee in the same spot to mark it as his own. In his mind, this gives him the strategic advantage as the big dog at least the most recent one.

Canine Social Networking
Just because his paws don't fit on your computer keyboard doesn't mean your canine companion isn't keeping in touch with his network of furry friends. Before he finds just the right potty spot, your dog is sniffing around to see who else has done some business nearby.

dog smell

With noses that are between 1,000 and 10,000 times more sensitive than yours, dogs can get the scoop about their neighbors without saying a word. Smelling the markings of other dogs tells your pup which dogs have been there, the gender of the dogs and whether the dogs are young and healthy.

The Doggy Pick-Up Bar
Females in heat sometimes pee more often, possibly in an attempt to attract available males. How does this attraction work? They simply wait for their male counterparts to walk by and take a sniff of what they left behind. Your pooch can smell whether there's a female in heat nearby while he's sniffing around for a potty place, and he's likely to mark that spot immediately and start frantically sniffing to find out what direction she went.

dog smell

A female dog who smells the same spot will probably ignore it, unless she's also in heat, then she might mark the spot herself to try to steal all the male attention.

The Super Sniffer
Even if your pooch didn't want to use his nose for news, he can't help it. His nose is specially designed to gather and hold scent particles so he can find smells that are important to his survival, such as finding the markings of well-fed dogs. According to the Canine Training Center, your pup has upwards of 220 million scent receptors. Compare this to your estimated 5 million. Dogs also have a Jacobson's organ that helps them use their sense of taste to amplify scents and help identify them.








A member of the French Urban Search and Rescue Task Force works with his Alsatian to uncover victims at the site of the collapsed World Trade Center.Photo courtesy FEMA, photograph by Andrea Booher
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SAR Dog Basics
Experts estimate that a single SAR dog can accomplish the work of 20 to 30 human searchers. It's not just about smell, either dogs' superior hearing and night vision also come into play. Time is always an issue in search and rescue. In an avalanche situation, for instance, approximately 90 percent of victims are alive 15 minutes after burial; 35 minutes after burial, only 30 percent of victims are alive. While most avalanche victims don't survive, their chances increase exponentially when dogs are in on the search. Even in cases where victims are presumed dead, dogs are invaluable assets - they locate the bodies so family members can have closure and give their loved one a proper burial.

What dog smell and sniff?

SAR dogs can do a lot of amazing things, including rappel down mountainsides with their handler, locate a human being within a 500-meter radius, find a dead body under water, climb ladders and walk across an unstable beam in a collapsed building, but it's all toward a single end: Finding human scent. This may be in the form of a living person, a dead body, a human tooth or an article of clothing. SAR dogs find missing persons, search disaster areas for survivors and bodies and locate evidence at crime scenes, all by focusing on the smell of a human being.

What dog smell and sniff?

To people, this may seem like a difficult task. But to dogs, whose sense of smell is about 40 times stronger than a person's, it's a snap! To a dog, the scent of a human is as powerful and distinctive as the smell of a freshly baked apple pie is to a person. Human beings are smelly creatures, they constantly shed dead skin cells called rafts, which contain bacteria and smell distinctly human. While it's impossible to know for sure, most experts believe that SAR dogs are smelling these rafts, which form a "scent cone" that the dog can easily pinpoint, when they're performing a search. Everyone's skin cells smell unique, which is how a dog can smell an item of clothing and search specifically for the last person who wore it.

While some dogs exhibit a stronger desire to scent than others, every canine out there has a powerful sense of smell. SAR dogs may be purebreds or mutts. Some handlers have a breed of choice, but any medium-to-large dog in good physical health, with decent intelligence, good listening skills, a non-aggressive personality and a strong play/prey drive (an intense, enduring desire to retrieve a toy) can potentially go into search and rescue. SAR dogs need to be big enough to successfully navigate treacherous terrain and push debris out of the way and yet small enough to transport easily. You actually don't find too many Saint Bernard search dogs these days, because they can be cumbersome. German shepherds are a popular SAR breed, they're typically smart, obedient and agile, and their double layered coat insulates against severe weather conditions. Hunting and herding dogs like Labrador and golden retrievers and border collies tend to be good at SAR work, too, because they have a very strong prey drive. Many people consider bloodhounds to be the best breed for tracking - their giant ears and facial folds serve to collect and concentrate scent particles right at their nostrils, making their sense of smell extremely powerful and discerning. A bloodhound can pick up a trail weeks after other breeds can't find it. This brings us to a distinction between types of SAR dogs: Some dogs track, while other dogs search.

Alpha Dog
While the dog performs the actual search, the handler is always in control. SAR handlers are volunteers, and they are highly trained for their work - they are physically fit and able to work in extreme conditions, they know how to navigate in a wide range of environments and they can provide emergency medical care (many handlers are certified EMTs). They can also communicate with their dog as if they speak the same language - which in a way, they do. Dogs and handlers read each other's body language, and a smart dog can develop a 5-word vocabulary in addition to interpreting his handler's tone of voice.

What dog smell and sniff?








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