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DOG FUR, COAT, HAIR & WOOL
DOGICA® 3D World of Dog & Puppy

DOG FUR, COAT, HAIR & WOOL















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DOG FUR, HAIR & WOOL
Do Dogs Coats Get Thicker in Winter?
Do all dogs have Fur or Hair?
What makes a Dog's Coat Shiny?
Best Dog Hair Removal Tools List
How to Untangle Matted Dog Hair?
Dog Fur and Dog Hair - What's the Difference?
How to Keep Dog's Coat Shiny & Healthy?
Dog Coat, Wool, Fur & Hair Styles & Types
What is Dog Hair Made Out Of?
Do Standard Poodles Have Hair or Fur?
How can I Make my Dog's Coat Shiny?
Hypoallergenic Dogs: Fur Facts & Fictions
Dog Coat Colors & Patterns Chart
Dog Fur Human Clothes
Dog Coat Texture & Length
Dog Coat Colors & Patterns
Dog Haircut and Grooming Guide
Dog and Puppy Fur Dye
Why Dogs Shedding & Matting?
What is a Double Coated Dog?
Not Shedding Dog Breeds
Extreme Dog Fur Artwork
Extra Dog Haircut Photos
Dog Breeds with Fur
How to Clean Dog's Fur
How to Groom Dog
White vs Albino Dogs
Albinism in Dogs
How to Shave Your Dog
Do All Dogs Grow a Winter Coat?
How to Knitt a Dog Fur Yarm
Winter & Summer Dog Coat Care
How to Remove Fur Matts
Brushing Your Dog
Dog Fur & Hair Smell
Dog Markings & Colors
Dog Color Genetics
Breeding Dogs in Colors
Odorless Dog Breeds
Stinkiest Dog Breed
Dog Fur and Hair Colors
Dog Fur Types & Coat Facts
Double Coat Dog
Sable Color Dog


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DOG COAT TYPES
DOG COAT TYPES
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Dogs come in all different coat types, depending on their breed or mix of breeds. Before you start grooming your dog, understand his coat type. That little bit of knowledge will give you the edge when it comes to making him look his best. To determine what kind of coat type your dog has, take a close look at his fur - which category fits his coat?

DOG COAT TYPES
Dog Coat Types
How to Groom Them


1. Smooth Coat
Dogs who are smooth-coated do not need to be groomed often, so make sure to focus on quality over quantity when it comes to bathes and brushing. Use a bristle brush to brush against the lay of the hair. Using the same tool, brush with the lay of the top coat. The shampoo and conditioner will make hair shine and will help repel dust and dirt. Towel dry your dog after the bath and then let them air dry naturally.

2. Double Coat
A dog with a double coat will need a little more TLC than a smooth-coated dog. These dogs may have a short or long hair. You will need a slicker brush or pin brush for either length and a wide-toothed comb as well, for double-coated dogs with long hair. For short-haired double-coated dogs, use the brush to comb out the undercoat, brushing outward from the skin. Use the same brush to go over the topcoat, brushing with the lay of the coat. For long-haired double-coated dogs, take sections of the dog's hair and separate it with your hand before brushing with the slicker brush. Brush outward from the skin to help remove loose hairs in the thick undercoat. After you have brushed the whole body, take the wide-toothed comb and place it deep within the coat, parallel to the skin. Comb outward to remove more loose undercoat.

3. Wire Coat
This coat type, also known as Broken Coat, requires a slicker brush and a stripping comb. Starting with the stripping comb, run it lightly along the back of the dog, thinning the overgrown wiry coat. This will prevent mats and tangles. After thinning out the coat, brush the coat in layers from the skin outward with the slicker brush.

4. Curly Coat
Dogs with a curly or wavy coat, have thick and soft curls close to the body. You will need a soft slicker brush for this type of coat. Whether your dog is clipped in a modified show clip or a puppy clip, use the slicker to brush the coat against the way it grows to make it fluff up. Next, bathe your curly-haired dog with Shampoo and Conditioner. Towel dry him before fluff drying him using a blow dryer, while brushing him with the slicker brush from the skin out.

5. Long Coat
Don't let the intimidation of grooming a long-haired dog overwhelm you. Whether you have a long-haired dog with a coarse coat or a silky coat, a grooming regimen that suits you and your dog will help their coat continue to look their best. A Long-haired dog with a coarse coat has a softer undercoat mixed in. You will need a slicker brush or pin brush and a smooth bristle brush. Longer hair is at a greater risk for matting so have Detangler & Shine on hand. Start by removing any mats that you find by placing a dime size of Detangler & Shine on the mat and working it out with your fingers and the brush. Next, using the pin brush, brush the coat out gently in the direction that it grows. Then, go over the entire coat again with a soft bristle brush. Bathe your dog with Rosewater Shampoo and Rosewater Conditioner afterwards. Long-haired silky-coated dogs, have no undercoat. But as with the long, coarse coat, the biggest challenge in grooming a long, silky coat, is dealing with the mats that often form in the fine hair. Use the Detangler & Shine to remove all mats and then brush the entire coat with the lay of the hair. After grooming, bathe the dog with Shampoo and follow with Conditioner. Dry with a hair dryer, and brush the coat out.

6. Hairless Coat
Dogs with a hairless coat are just that - hairless. The Chinese Crested does have tufts of hair on the head, legs and tail but none on the body. Don't think this means you can skip grooming them though - they may not need brushing, but they do need bathing. Use Shampoo and a soft sponge to gently scrub while shampooing. The tufts of hair on the head, tail and legs can also be washed with Rosewater Shampoo. Rinse the dog thoroughly after shampooing. If the dog will be going outside, you will also need to use a gentle sunblock with SPF 15 or higher.








DOG COAT TYPES
DOUBLE COATED DOGS
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Two times the coat, two times the fur? If you have got a double coated dog, here's what you need to know about this type of fur. Every dog breed is just a little bit different from the others and these differences take many forms. One of the most basic ways in which one dog differs from another is in its coat. Dog coats can be divided into two main categories - single coat and double coat. Within each category there are some variations, but these are the two basic categories you should know before grooming your dog. Let's go over the basics about double coated dogs including which breeds have double coats and how to properly maintain this type of coat.

What is a Double Coat?
A double coat is a type of coat that consists of two layers. Double coated dogs have a dense undercoat of short hairs, typically with a wooly texture, over a top coat of longer hairs called guard hairs. The denser the undercoat, the fluffier the coat will appear to be and the more grooming the dog will require. The undercoat serves mainly to keep the dog protected from extreme temperatures - both hot and cold, while the top coat helps to repel moisture and dirt.

Which Dog Breeds Have Double Coats?
For the most part, you can tell just by looking at a dog whether it has a double or single coat. This is especially true for Spitz-type dogs and other breeds with thick, fluffy coats. There are also some small-breed dogs that have double coats including several terriers which have a wiry rather than a soft top coat. Some examples of double-coated breeds include:

Akita
Alaskan Husky
Chow Chow
Finnish Lapphund
Keeshond
Shiba Inu
Siberian Husky
Australian Shepherd
Old English Sheepdog
Shetland Sheepdog
Bernese Mountain Dog
Great Pyrenees
Newfoundland
Golden Retriever
Labrador Retriever
Cairn Terrier
Parson Russel Terrier
Scottish Terrier
Miniature Schnauzer
Havanese
Pomeranian
Shih Tzu
Yorkshire Terrier

Grooming Tips
for Double-Coated Breeds

Regular grooming is incredibly important for double-coated dog breeds because these dogs tend to shed a lot. If you do not routinely brush your dog's coat the shed hairs will become caught up in the coat, causing mats and tangles to form. Grooming is also a great way to keep dog-related allergies to a minimum, though you cannot keep a dog from shedding entirely. Below you will find a collection of tips for grooming your double coated dog:

1. - Brush your dog at least two or three times a week to prevent mats and tangles.

2. - Use a undercoat grooming rake to remove loose and dead hairs from your dog's undercoat.

3. - Use a slicker brush on your dog's rump where the fur is thicker and longer.

4. - Go over your dog with a wire pin brush or comb to remove dead and loose hairs from the top coat.

5. - Work through mats and tangles with a wide-tooth comb - if you have to cut one out, pinch the fur as close to your dog's skin as possible to prevent accidentally cutting his skin.

6. - Go over your dog's coat with a bristle brush to improve shine - this should be your last step.

In addition to learning how to groom your double-coated dog, you should also familiarize yourself with a few grooming mistakes that dog owners often make. The biggest mistake you can make with your double coated dog is to shave his coat. Some dog owners mistakenly believe that their dog's double coat makes them hot in the summer and they shave the dog's coat in an attempt to cool him off. What these dog owners do not realize is that a dog's double coat acts as insulation, protecting him from the heat. A dog's double coat is part of his natural cooling system - each layer helps not only to keep the dog cool, but it protects his skin from sun damage as well. If you are worried about your dog being too hot in the summer, consult a professional groomer about the possibility of trimming his coat but in no case should you shave your double coated dog. Grooming is one of your most basic responsibilities as a pet owner so it is up to you to make sure you know how to do it correctly.








PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE - DOG COAT COLOR GENETICS INFOGRAM
DOG COLORING & COAT GENETICS
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DOG COAT COLOR GENETICS CHART INFORMATION BREEDS
EUMELANIN
Does your dog have black fur? Eumelanin is a pigment in a dog's genes that expresses itself in a dog,s coat color, nose color, and eye color. This will determine how "black" a dog's coat is or if they have any black markings on their coat at all. Breeds such as a Black Lab or a Newfoundland dog, for example, will have a strong concentration of Eumelanin in their coats. Do you wonder why most dogs have black noses? This is because the Eumelanin pigment is the default coloration for most dogs! Eumelanin can be altered slightly so that it produces a pigment closer to gray, brown, or light brown. These hues respectively are called "blue," "liver," and "isabella." If a dog's Eumelanin goes more liver, for example, not only will their coat color be affected but also their nose color and eye color.

DOG COAT COLOR GENETICS CHART INFORMATION BREEDS
PHEOMELANIN
Does your pup's fur stray more into the red-tones? A secondary pigment called Phaeomelanin is also an important determinant of a dog's fur. Unlike the way that Eumelanin also affects the coloration of a dog's nose and eyes, Phaeomelanin only affects their coat color. Also, Phaeomelanin only expresses one color - red - as opposed to two groups of color like Eumelanin's liver and black. It includes dogs with truly red coats - such as an Irish Setter, and also includes a wider range of hues including golden tans, yellows, and oranges. A dog's genetics determine how pronounced the Phaeomelanin is and how dense the hue of their coat is. Think your dog's coat is totally unique? You are absolutely correct: while families tend to have similar coat patterns, stray spots here and there will differ from dog to dog. This is how every coat color and combination end up being truly unique!

DOG COAT COLOR GENETICS CHART INFORMATION BREEDS
ALBINISM
What if your dog's coat is white? Good question: it really doesn't fall under either of the pigments we have explained! White, the presence of all color in the visible light spectrum, is the absence of all color and information in a dog coat. Dogs have white coats whenever both of these pigments are inhibited or whenever the Eumelanin and the Phaeomelanin are extremely weak. For example, whenever a dog has a completely white body and a black nose and darker eyes, it means that the Phaeomelanin is dominant but unpronounced. However, in the case of albino dogs or breeds where the genetics don't clearly delineate a dominant/recessive relationship, the eyes will be blue and the nose will likely be pink because the Eumelanin is not affecting those traits. A true albino dog would have red eyes, but it is more common to find dogs with weakened traits as opposed to the anomaly of actual albinism. "White spotting" under the technical term epistasis, in a dog refers to white patches that lay on top of any Eumelanin or Phaeomelanin on a dog. This means that any dog coat color can be speckled with white regardless of their dominant pigmentation. Like the primary colors on the color wheel, small bits of pigment help determine a wide variety of color. These fundamental principles help us better understand the reasons behind each pup's uniquely colored coat.










DOG HAIR COAT WOOL FUR
DOG FUR vs DOG HAIR
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The terms fur and hair are often used interchangeably when describing a dog's coat, however in general, a double coat, e.g., like that of the Newfoundland and most mountain dogs, is referred to as a fur coat, while a single coat, like that of the Poodle, is referred to as a hair coat.

dog fur, coat, hair infographics - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE !

Today I found out that there isn't any difference between fur and hair - it's all just hair!

We tend to refer to a lot of animal hair as "fur", while referring to our own hair as just "hair". It turns out though that hair and fur are chemically indistinguishable, both made up of keratin. The argument that is often cited as to why there must be a difference is that human hair will just keep growing forever, while most animal "fur" stops at a set length. In fact, the latter is true, but the former is not. Human hair will stop growing after a certain period and with your scalp at least, it tends to be a longer period than with many animals, though it varies on different parts of your body.

DOG HAIR COAT WOOL FUR

The maximum length of hair on various parts of your body is entirely determined by your genetics and varies widely from person to person and animal to animal. Each hair follicle has a period of growing and not growing. During the anagen period your hair grows. During the catagen period, your hair stops growing and the outer root sheath shrinks and the root of the hair is cut off from its blood supply and from the cells that produce new hair. This is followed by a telogen period, where more or less the follicle is resting. Eventually your hair falls out and the whole cycle starts again.

DOG and PUPPY haircut

For humans, a typical anagen period for your scalp hair follicles will last between 2-7 years... the resting phase, telogen, here lasts about 100 days. On your arms and your legs, the anagen period lasts around 30-45 days. This explains why the hair on your arms and legs doesn't get that long compared to your head hair and more or less always seems to stay at a seemingly fixed length.

DOG and PUPPY haircut

Various mammals have different growth cycles on their hair than humans do, thus why cat hair seems to stop growing at a certain, relatively short, length; not too dissimilar from the growth rate and length of the hair on a human's arms and legs. But in the end, hair and fur are chemically the same exact thing. There is no difference other than what we chose to call "fur" or "hair", which is often pretty arbitrary.

DOG HAIR COAT WOOL FUR

For instance, in many dogs with naturally short hair, it is typical to call this fur, though not always. But if the dog's hair gets naturally long, we tend to call this hair, even though the only difference is in the length of the anagen period of the hair follicle growth cycle. Dogs such as the Poodle or Havanese tend to have a very long anagen cycle, which is why most pet owners will have their hair cut. Other dogs, such as a Labrador, have relatively short anagen periods, so their hair never gets that long.


DOG and PUPPY haircut

Fur and Hair Are Chemically the Same
The reality is that both fur and hair are chemically indistinguishable. They are both made up of keratin, the chemical that also creates skin and nails. Technically this means that whether a dog has hair or fur, it's not the reason they may appear to be hypoallergenic.

DOG HAIR COAT WOOL FUR

Hair Has a Longer Growth Cycle
One difference in determining hair from fur is the growing cycle. Hair has various growth phases and the length of the various phases helps determine if people consider the dog's coat to be fur or hair.

Anagen is the phase of new hair growth.

Catagen is the transition phase where hair stops growing and the outer root sheath attaches to the hair.

Telogen is the resting phase.

Exogen is when the hair falls out and the follicle moves back into the anagen phase. The exogen phase is typically longer during warm months as the undercoats and excess hair are used as insulation during cold weather.

DOG and PUPPY haircut

Hair seems to continuously grow, having a longer anagen phase, while coats that continuously shed have shorter anagen hair growth phases and are called fur.

DOG and PUPPY haircut

The hair of a dog does not grow continously, but in cycles, similar to our eyebrows. Anagen is the first phase, in which the hair is produced. The new hair grows along side the old hair, which is subsequently lost. Catagen is an intermediate stage in the cycle, and telogen is the resting phase in which the follicle is basically dormant. The hair follicles are not all in the same phase at the same time, which is why we do not see a lot of bald dogs!


DOG HAIR COAT WOOL FUR

Fur and Hair Have Different Textures
Texture is also a key factor in distinguishing hair from fur. Hair tends to be longer and finer in texture, and will frequently be wavy or curly. It is this curliness that actually traps the shedding hair and dander inside the coat, giving the appearance that the coat doesn't shed and doesn't produce allergic reactions. It is this factor, along with absence of an undercoat, that gives the impression that certain breeds are allergen-free. Fur is typically shorter and more dense in texture, with a finer undercoat during the colder months for warmth. Because the shedding hair easily drops from the dog, it only appears that the shedding is more profuse than the finer hair coat. The only real differences between hair and fur are the descriptions that we have applied to hair and fur that determine the type of coat a dog has. One is not more allergen-free than the other, it is the lack of loose hair and dander as well as well as other factors, that determine whether a person is allergic or not.








DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health
DOG FUR HEALTHINESS
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You can tell a lot about the general health of your dog by taking a good look at her coat and skin. A healthy dog is a beautiful dog, and a coat that's nice and shiny is a strong indicator that your pet's in peak condition.

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

Signs of a healthy coat
How do you know if your dog's coat is in good shape?
Just use your senses!

A healthy coat should feel pliable and smooth, even the wiry pelts of dogs like Terriers. If the texture's dry or coarse, or if the hair's brittle and broken (yes, dogs get split ends too), then you need to take action.

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

A healthy coat looks good, too. Think about it the same way you think about your own hair: you want your pet's coat to be shiny and lustrous, bouncy and resilient, not limp or bristly or dull.

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

The coat should smell good, even when it hasn't just been washed. In fact, if her coat's dry and well cared for, and you're washing her about once a month or so, your dog shouldn't smell bad at all. A rancid, oily, or sour odor signals that bacteria are breaking down the skin's natural protective oils. Your dog may be suffering from flea bites, or hot spots, or very dry skin.


DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

What keeps the coat healthy?
The single most important factor in growing a gorgeous coat is good nutrition, or a diet rich in fatty acids and meat, poultry, or fish. This means that the label on the package should list some kind of meat (beef, lamb), poultry (chicken), or fish as the first and most dominant ingredient-not corn, wheat, barley, or rice. For extra shine, some nutritionists also recommend mixing a teaspoonful of vegetable oil into your dog's food once or twice a day.

Grooming is another way to improve your dog's coat health. Regular brushing with a soft-bristled brush can help keep keep your dog's fur clean and glossy.

Practicing good flea control is also very helpful, so stick to a schedule of applying flea prevention product (suggestions include Frontline, Advantage, or Revolution) every month.

Dietary supplements may or may not help. If you think your dog's coat isn't all it should be, try switching foods first. If that doesn't work, a vet may be able to help you decide whether it makes sense to feed your dog omega-3s, or some other type of essential fatty acids supplement. Feel free to experiment yourself, these healthy fats can only help your dog. But be aware it will be a matter of weeks or months before you'll be able to notice any significant improvement.


DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

Hot spots
Any dog with matted or dirty hair or a naturally thick coat may be more prone to hot spots. A bacterial infection officially called pyrotraumatic dermatitis, or moist eczema. Hot spots begin as infected bites or scratches, and as the infection spreads very rapidly hair falls out, pus forms, and the area begins to smell awful. The spot is actually warm to the touch. Hot spots are most common in breeds with thick coats, such as Golden Retrievers, Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels, and German Shepherds, and they occur more often in the warmer months. But they can afflict any dog at any time of the year. You can help stay on top of them by shaving your dog closely during the summer.


DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

Shedding
Shedding isn't necessarily a sign of a problem. Even if you can pluck out clumps of fur, as long as the coat is reasonably dense with no bald spots, your dog's hair loss is probably normal. Dogs who spend most of their time outdoors tend to shed mostly during the spring and fall, but indoor dogs shed any time, or all the time. It's not entirely clear what triggers shedding; hormones, environmental factors, stress, and poor nutrition probably have something to do with it. But the process of growth, rest, shedding, and regrowth is part of the canine coat life cycle, and it's perfectly normal. Your best strategy for dealing with it is to make sure your vacuum cleaner's in good working order.


DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health
CHECK 6 WAYS
TO KEEP DOG's COAT NOT SHEDDING
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When it's time to see the vet?
If you see any of these symptoms, it's time to visit the vet:

A significant change in your dog's coat or skin

Evidence of parasites

Open sores

Hot spots or signs of infection.








DOG and PUPPY COAT SHINING - HOW TO KEEP, MAKE DOG FUR SHINING?
DOG FUR SHINING TIPS
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Your dog's coat is one of the clearest indicators of your dog's overall health. A dull or damaged coat may indicate disease, poor grooming, or parasites. If you've determined that your dog isn't suffering from a medical condition that affects his coat, it's easy to make your dog's coat shine. Flaxseed oil and fish oils are rich in Omega 6. Unfortunately, fish oils do smell "fishy" so you may prefer to give a capsule so that the dog's breath doesn't smell bad as a result. Be wary of over-the-counter treatments if you suspect your dog has internal parasites. These store-bought remedies can be poisonous to your dog.

PART I:
Improving Your Dog's Coat


1. Feed your dog a healthy and well-balanced diet.
If you buy a commercial dog food, make sure it contains the proper balance of nutrients. You may want to ask your vet to recommend a product and dosage specific to your dog. A nutritionally-rich diet is important in maintaining the health and condition of your dog's coat. If you choose to make your own dog food, talk with the vet about making sure it's got the right balance of vitamins and minerals. Making your own dog food at home is a great way to be completely sure of what you are feeding your dog.

2. Supplement your dog's diet with omega fatty acids.
Look for an omega-6 supplement or consider adding safflower or sunflower oil to your dog's food. If adding the oil, give 1 teaspoon a day to a small dog or 1 tablespoon a day for a large dog. Avoid giving too much, since it could cause diarrhea. You may also want to give omega-3 fatty acids, which have a greater anti-inflammatory effect. These are found in flaxseed and fish oils. Regardless of the supplement you choose, always follow the packaging for dosage instructions. Omega fatty acids can reduce the itchy skin of dogs with allergies, since they have natural anti-inflammatory effects. They also nourish the cells that are developing at the deepest layer of your dog's skin. It will take at least 28 days for these skin cells to become the top layer and reveal an extra plush coat, so don't stop supplementing before that time.

3. Groom your dog regularly.
You should groom your dog every few days, regardless of whether he has long or short hair. Be sure to use dog brushes and combs, since they're designed to remove tangles, mats, dead skin cells, and dander. You will need to look for tools that are best suited to your dog's fur. Always brush with the lie of the fur to distribute the natural oils through the hair and use a comb to get rid of tangles. Grooming also improves the oxygen supply to your dog's skin. This can improve the health and look of your dog's coat. You may want to rub a dry leather chamois over your dog's coat to buff and polish it.

5. Bathe your dog with the proper shampoo.
To avoid stripping the natural oils from your dog's coat, leaving him prone to dryness, shampoo your dog no more than once a month. Choose a shampoo specifically made for dogs and look for one that matches your dog's coat and skin sensitivity. For example, if your dog scratches a lot, you may want to choose a sensitive shampoo or look for one made with oatmeal since oatmeal acts as a natural itch reliever. If your dog loves to roll in mud and needs frequent washing, chose the mildest shampoo you can find, preferably one that's moisturizing. Be sure to rinse the dog's coat thoroughly. Any residual shampoo or conditioner left in the coat can irritate the skin and make the coat look dull and lifeless.

6. Check for parasites.
Thoroughly look through your dog's coat for parasites, like fleas or ticks, which can affect your dog's coat and overall health. Since ticks are larger and slower, they will be easier to see than fleas. To check for fleas, run your fingers over several parts of your dog's coat - like behind the ears, down the back, near the tail, and on the belly. Look for small pinpoint-sized black spots, known as flea dirt. These are flea droppings that are usually concentrated in one area. You may want the veterinarian to check for worms and other internal parasites. These can feed off your dog and rob him of nutrients, damaging his coat. Your vet can check a fecal sample and prescribe medication to treat your dog. One parasite (cheyletiella) is known as "walking dandruff" because it looks like large flakes of dandruff and if you watch carefully you may see it walk. Your vet will check for this and might recommend your dog be sprayed with medication once every two weeks for 2 or 3 treatments.


PART II:
Identifying Skin & Health Issues


1. Determine if your dog is unwell.
If your dog is sick or feeling nauseous, he may stop grooming. This leads to a dull, unkempt coat and can signal to veterinarians that your dog has a medical condition. Check in with your veterinarian if you notice any one of the following symptoms in your dog:
Lack of appetite, Excessive thirst, Vomiting, Diarrhea or soft stools, Smelly Breath, Smelly ears, Lameness, Difficulty Breathing.

2. Check your dog for sore teeth.
Sore teeth can make it harder for your dog to eat. As a consequence, he may be messier and get food in his coat. To check for sore teeth, lift your dog's lip and take a look at the teeth and gums. His mouth should look like yours, with white teeth and pink gums. If the teeth are coated in tartar - a white buildup, the teeth are wobbly, or the gums are inflamed and bleeding, then your pet needs veterinary attention. You may also notice your dog's breath smells bad and he's a messy eater. If his teeth hurt, he will drop food out of his mouth when he chews. This can contribute to a dirty coat.

3. Consider if your dog has arthritis
Arthritis, or inflammation of the joints, can cause stiffness and pain. Your dog may be too stiff and sore to easily groom himself. If this is the case, you will notice your dog walking stiffly and having difficulty using stairs or jumping in a vehicle. You will need to talk to the veterinarian about medication to treat the pain of arthritis. In the meantime, help your dog by grooming him daily. Pay particular attention to areas that your dog can't comfortably reach.

4. Check if your dog has a greasy coat or scaly skin.
Pay attention for scaly, dandruff prone skin or an especially greasy coat. Your dog may have a condition called seborrhea, in which the skin's follicles create too much oil. This can trigger skin flaking or dandruff. Your vet will need to determine the cause of the greasy or scaly skin in order to recommend a treatment. Your vet may recommend supplementing your dog's diet with vitamin A or zinc to clear up any skin conditions.








HYPOALLERGENIC DOGS - INFOGRAPHIC, INFOGRAM, DOG FUR
HYPOALLERGENIC DOGS:
FUR FACTS & FICTIONS

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Allergy sufferers who still want to share their home with a canine companion have been known to drop big bucks on breeds that are being touted as "hypoallergenic dogs." These are dogs who are reported to have lower household allergen levels compared to other pooches. But before you throw out your bottle of Visine and handkerchief, a new study suggests that this just may be fur fiction.

HYPOALLERGENIC DOGS - INFOGRAPHIC, INFOGRAM, DOG FUR

Prominent allergen researchers have found that there is no basis to the claim "that certain dog breeds are hypoallergenic" and have found that allergen levels vary among individual dogs, not individual breeds. The American Journal of Rhinology and Allergy published a study in 2011 that revealed the amount of dog allergens found in households does not vary depending on the breed, and families with "hypoallergenic" dogs are living with the same level of allergens in their homes as people who live with a, shall we say, "common" dog.

HYPOALLERGENIC DOGS - INFOGRAPHIC, INFOGRAM, DOG FUR

The researchers measured the level of the most common dog allergen, Canis familiaris 1, in the homes of 173 families who lived with one dog and found that 163 of them produced measurable levels of Can f 1. The numbers of dogs of each breed were not large enough to allow for analyses by individual breed, but the researchers compared quantities of allergens found in the samples using various categories of purebred and mixed-breed hypoallergenic and non-hypoallergenic dogs. No matter how they did the comparisons even comparing dogs suggested as being "more hypoallergenic" by the AKC against all other dogs they found no statistically significant differences in levels of Can f 1.

HYPOALLERGENIC DOGS - INFOGRAPHIC, INFOGRAM, DOG FUR

The AKC does not actually recommend or endorse any specific breed, nor does it claim that hypoallergenic breeds will not affect people with allergies, but they do suggest 11 canine candidates that have "consistent and predictable coats" that may benefit allergy sufferers. Basically, these are the breeds that have more of a non-shedding coat, which in turn produces less dander, and therefore less allergens in the environment.

How then, was the legend of the hypoallergenic dog born? Good question, as no one really knows where the whole concept got its start. But perform an internet search with the terms "hypoallergenic dog" and you will see endless links touting the perfect allergy-free pooch. I was most shocked when I read about Simon Brodie of Lifestyle Pets, a controversial U.S.-based company that breeds and sells cats and dogs as "hypoallergenic" at a price of $16,000 each! And, no, that was not a typo with an extra one or two "0's" on the end!


HYPOALLERGENIC DOGS - INFOGRAPHIC, INFOGRAM, DOG FUR

How to reduce the sniffling and sneezing?

By following these tips, you may be able to lessen the allergenic load in your environment and live more harmoniously with your canine companions:

1. - Make sure your pet's essential fatty acid requirements are met. By assuring your dog or kitty has optimal levels of EFAs in the diet, you can reduce shedding and dander associated with EFA deficiency. Adding coconut oil has also proven to help reduce dander and shedding.

2. - Bathe your pet often. Even kitties can be bathed regularly, but take special care to use only safe, non-drying herbal animal shampoos. Whatever you do, avoid using people shampoo on your dog or cat, and skip any shampoo containing oatmeal.

3. - Invest in a good quality vacuum designed for households with pets.

4. - Clean your home frequently and thoroughly, including any surfaces that trap pet hair and dander like couch covers, pillows and pet beds. This will also help control other allergens in your home that could be contributing to the allergic load of family members.

5. - Wash bedding frequently in hot water.

6. - If your pet rides in the car with you, consider using washable seat covers.

7. - Purchase a good quality air purifier for your home.

8. - If possible, remove carpeting, drapes and other fabric that traps animal dander. Tile or wood floors are much easier to clean of allergens.








DOG and PUPPY haircut
DIFFERENT DOG BREEDS COAT:
STRUCTURE, LENGTH & TEXTURE

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Dog breed coats vary markedly. For example, there are hairless dogs, dogs with double coats, having both a primary or outer coat and an undercoat and dogs with a primary coat but no undercoat. There are dogs with different coat textures, from wavy or curly, to straight, to wiry, harsh or hard. There are also coats of different lengths, from short to long.

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

Naturally, the hairless dogs shed the least. These dogs still need attention for their skin, which can sunburn easily. They are also easily chilled. Dog breeds with only a primary outer coat appear to shed less than dogs with both primary and undercoats. Dogs with wiry or wavy coats appear not to shed because their hairs are trapped in the coat and don't fall to the floor. Dogs with short hair appear to shed less than dogs with long hair because they have much more hair. The following lists breeds according to coat characteristics: amount of coat hair, coat texture, and coat length:


DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

Hairless Dog Breeds
American Hairless Terrier
Chinese Crested
Mexican Hairless Dog
Peruvian Hairless Dog


Breeds with Only Primary Coat
(No Undercoat Hair)

A primary coat, also called a guard coat, is present in some dogs, but they have no undercoat. These dogs can have straight or curly coats, but the coat does not appear dense. Because there is less hair on the dog, there is less shedding than with dogs that have both primary coats and undercoats.

Afghan Hound
Italian Greyhound
Australian Terrier
Kerry Blue Terrier
Basenji
Lowchen
Bedlington Terrier
Lhasa Apso
Bichon Frise
Maltese
Border Terrier
Poodles (all sizes)
Bouvier des Flandres
Portuguese Water Dog
Cairn terrier
Schnauzer (all sizes)
Coton de Tulear
German Shorthaired Pointer
Shih Tzu
Greyhound
Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
Havanese
Spanish Water Dog
Irish Water Spaniel
Yorkshire Terrier
Whippet


DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

Dog Breed Coat Texture
Coat texture influences shedding. Dog breeds with wavy or wiry coats shed less because their hair is caught and held in the coat rather than shed to the floor. These dogs require hand stripping or professional trimming. Dog breeds with smooth coats often have short hair so they appear to shed less than dogs with long hair although technically they may lose the same number of hairs.

Smooth Coated Dog Breeds
American Staffordshire Terrier
Australian Cattle Dog
Basset Hound
Beagle
Belgian Malinois
Bloodhound
Border Collie (smooth)
Boston Terrier
Boxer
Bulldog
Bull Terrier
Chihuahua
Collie (smooth coated)
Dachshund
Dalmatian
Doberman Pinscher
Foxhound
Great Dane
Greyhound
Labrador Retriever
Mastiff
Miniature Pinscher
Pointer
Pug
Rhodesian Ridgeback
Rottweiler
Saluki
Smooth Fox Terrier
Vizsla
Weimaraner
Whippet


Wavy or curly coated dog breeds
Bichon Frise
Bedlington Terrier
Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Curly-Coated Retriever
Irish Water Spaniel
Kerry Blue Terrier
Komondor
Poodle
Portuguese Water Dog
Wheaton Terrier


Wiry, Harsh, or Hard Coated Dog Breeds
Airedale Terrier
Australian Terrier
Border Terrier
Brussels Griffon
Cairn Terrier
Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Dachshund Wire-haired
Irish Terrier
Lakeland Terrier
Norfolk Terrier
Otterhound
Parson Russell Terrier
Scottish Terrier
Sealyham Terrier
Schnauzer
Welsh Terrier
West Highland White Terrier
Wire Fox terrier


DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

Dog Breed Coat Lengths
The length of the hair is a factor in how much hair appears to have been shed. The shorter the coat, the less hair on the carpet. Dogs with shorter coats are also easier to groom. They may be more sensitive to heat and to cold than dogs with medium or long coats.

Dog Breeds with Short Coat Lengths
American Staffordshire Terrier
Australian Cattle Dog
Basset Hound
Beagle
Belgian Malinois
Bloodhound
Boston Terrier
Boxer
Bulldog
Bull Terrier
Chihuahua
Collie (smooth coated)
Dachshund
Dalmatian
Doberman
Foxhound
Great Dane
Greyhound
Mastiff
Miniature Pinscher
Pointer
Pug
Rhodesian Ridgeback
Rottweiler
Saluki
Smooth Fox Terrier
Vizsla
Weimaraner
Whippet

Dog Breeds with Medium Coat Lengths
Akita
Alaskan Malamute
Australian Shepherd
Border Collie
Brittany Spaniel
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
English Springer Spaniel
German Shepherd Dog
Great Pyrenees
Labrador Retriever
Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever
Norwegian Elkhound
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Saint Bernard
Siberian Husky
Tibetan Spaniel

Dog Breeds with Long Coats Lengths
Afghan Hound
Bearded Collie
Belgian Tervuren
Bernese Mountain Dog
Briard
Chow Chow
Cocker Spaniel
Collie
English Setter
Golden Retriever
Havanese
Irish Setter
Japanese Chin
Keeshond
Lhasa Apso
Maltese
Newfoundland
Old English Sheepdog
Papillion
Pekingese
Pomeranian
Saint Bernard
Samoyed
Shetland Sheepdog
Shih Tzu
Silky Terrier
Skye Terrier
Tibetan Terrier
Yorkshire Terrier








DOG and PUPPY haircut
DETERMINE A DOG
BY THE HAIR STYLE

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DOG FUR vs DOG HEALTH
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Michael Sarko

A happy dog is a healthy dog, and a healthy dog has strong, shiny fur. Your dog's coat is one of the best ways to gain insight into your dog's condition, be it physical or emotional. It's very important to get to know the ideal qualities of your furry friend's breed and to set aside time to maintain his or her coat with regular brushing and washing.

DOG and PUPPY haircut

The right food
A balanced diet with plenty of protein and amino acid content will help strengthen and replenish your dog's coat by giving it the building blocks of the hair's natural structure. Dog fur is made mostly of protein, so a coat that is dull or fragile can be an indication that your pooch isn't getting the best nutrition. Do your research about the best kind of food and the right portions of it for your dog. If the diet needs an extra boost, you can talk to your vet about pet supplements.

DOG and PUPPY haircut

Unwanted guests
The fur can be an inviting shelter for ticks, fleas, and other parasites that are very bad for your dog's health. This is especially true in dirty, matted hair. Parasites can lead to infections and discomfort in your dog. Keeping the coat clean and brushed gets you up close and personal with your dog's skin and hair, ensuring that parasites stay away or don't get to set up shop for very long.

DOG and PUPPY haircut

Bad news with balding
Excessive hair loss or patches of baldness on your dog's coat can be a sign of any number of problems. This can result from such things as hormonal problems and tumors, though it can also be a symptom of emotional problems, like stress or impulse control issues. Different breeds have different rates of shedding, especially as the seasons change, but extreme or unusual hair loss can be an indication of more serious concerns for your dog's overall health.

DOG and PUPPY haircut

That "new dog" smell
The look and feel of the fur aren't the only ways to monitor your dog's health through his or her coat. The fur should also smell fresh in between baths. A strong, musky, or foul odor on dry fur is often an indication of bacterial infection, fungus, fleas, or even dry skin. A coat that stays stinky even after a scrub is a sign that a visit to the vet may be in order. Keeping your dog's coat strong and shiny will teach you a lot about how to care for his or her health in general. It's a great way to monitor nutrition, win the fight against parasites, and stay informed about your dog's feelings. It's also a wonderful way to bond. Regular brushing, baths, and petting are all part of the process, so show your dog love and attention for the good of his or her health as well as the good of your relationship with one another.

Do you keep a specific regimen to ensure your dog's fur is healthy, strong, and shiny?








DOG SHEDDING
SHEDDING DOGS
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Dogs shed, it's what they do! However, excessive dog shedding might be a cause for concern, as it can often be symptomatic of an underlying condition. Learn the signs of normal dog shedding and how it's different from illness-related shedding. Shedding is part of everyday life with a dog. Excessive dog shedding, however, could be a sign of an underlying issue that could require attention and care.

DOG SHEDDING

WHAT IS NORMAL SHEDDING?
All dogs shed (except for the American Hairless Terriers, who are physically incapable due to their hairlessness). Most dogs shed year round, though some will "blow their coat" seasonally, once or twice a year, in a most spectacular fashion

DOG SHEDDING

Year Round Shedding
Some dogs shed a lot, and some don't. If your dog is healthy and regularly sheds a lot, it's just part of who they are. As a loving pet parent, it's your cross to bear Most normal shedding is the loss of the undercoat, with some regular loss of fur. Normal shedding will occur year round, and will be visible on your clothes, sofa, and around the house, but will not generally be visible on the dog's body. If you do notice patches of fur missing, it is time for a trip to the vet.

DOG SHEDDING

Seasonal Shedding
Seasonal shedding occurs with some breeds, usually in the spring, but may also happen in the fall. Seasonal shedding occurs evenly across the whole body, and will happen every year on a cycle. This type of shedding is typical among cold weather breeds like Huskies. It's not something to be alarmed about, it's perfectly natural and can be managed through daily grooming with an undercoat rake like the Furminator!


DOG SHEDDING

WHEN TO BE CONCERNED ABOUT EXCESSIVE SHEDDING?

Fur Loss vs. Shedding. Fur loss due to sickness is not really "shedding" per se, but rather loss of hair due to a factor other than the general rhythms of hair growth. In the case of adrenal diseases like Cushing's disease, illness-related traumas, or infections, you'll likely see spotty or patchy hair loss, as opposed to more general shedding. In some cases, as with a hypothyroid dog, the hair loss will be symmetrical, but isolated to certain parts of the dog's body.

Troubling Hair Loss in Dogs. Unusual hair loss is one of the best indications that there's an underlying health issue. If you notice any of the issues below, you should explore the reasons with your dog's vet.

Fur has become dry and brittle

Fur that breaks or falls out unevenly

Bald patches or clumps of lost hair

Hair loss accompanied by another skin problem

Dog is tender to the touch, or resists being touched where they're losing fur


DOG SHEDDING

CAUSES OF EXCESSIVE HAIR LOSS IN DOGS
Excessive hair loss can be due to a variety of factors including allergies, hormonal imbalances, and other deficiencies. Elimination is the best way to diagnose an allergic response. With veterinary assistance, remove all possible allergens from your dog's life until their fur grows back. Then slowly introduce items one by one till you figure out what was causing the problem.

Allergies - Your dog's hair could be falling out because of an allergic reaction to any of the following:

Food: An allergy to a single ingredient in a kibble or canned food can cause hair loss

Medications

Something in the environment like a household cleaner, or a dog bed

A new soap or shampoo

Pest bites, which can be addressed through monthly pest prevention

HormonesImbalances in your dog's thyroid can cause hair to become brittle and fall out. Hypothyroidism is a common condition among dogs, and can be readily treated with medication. Other hormonal issues involving the over- or under-production of testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone can cause a dog to shed more than usual.During pregnancy and lactation, many dogs will lose some hair. This is normal, but if it's excessive, see a vet about supplements.


Shedding Dogs Photos

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!

DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!








NOT SHEDDING DOGS
NOT SHEDDING DOGS
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While no dog is truly hypoallergenic as all dogs shed some allergens, there are some breeds that are known to be better for allergy sufferers. And, these same dogs that don't shed may just have you put away the lint roller for good.

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

DOGS THAT DOES NOT SHED, NOT SHEDDING DOG BREEDS

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DOG and PUPPY haircut
DOG HAIR CUT STYLES
(By Breed)

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DOG and PUPPY haircut
The Summer Cut
A summer cut is a good maintenance trim.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
The Lamb Trim
A lamb trim is good all purpose dog haircut. It can be put on many different long haired breeds. Poodles, terriers, toy breeds, as well as larger breeds.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
The Scissored Lamb Trim
A scissored lamb trim makes a nice looking dog grooming trim and gives you the option to be a little more creative in your dog grooming with the length and the shaping of the coat.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
Maltese Groom
When grooming a maltese you will need to decide if you're keeping your dog in a show trim, a variation of a show trim or a pet trim. In the long run a shorthaired trim will be less work for you and your dog. Whatever your decision you will need certain dog grooming equipment and to follow certain dog grooming processes.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
Havanese Groom
Grooming a Havanese: You've seen your Havanese in show coat, it looks great and in actuality it is a lot of work. If you are willing to take it on that's great otherwise you may want to think about putting your dog in a shorter trim, one that is more manageable and a lot less work.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
Chi Hua Hua
Chihuahua grooming is a fairly simple dog grooming task for both shorthaired and longhaired Chihuahuas. Long haired Chihuahuas are usually kept in their natural state but if the long coat is a problem you may want to give your dog a haircut. Either a summer cut, puppy cut or a variation of one of the two cuts.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
The Pomeraninan
Grooming a Pomeranian does not have to be lot of work. Daily brushing of your Pomeranian is a must if you're keeping him in full coat.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
American Cocker Spaniel
The American Cocker Spaniel haircut. This is dog grooming for your pet Cocker Spaniel.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
Miniature Schnauzer
The Miniature Schnauzer haircut is a specific dog haircut.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
The Continental
The Continental cut is the most popular cut for poodles. The style shows off the dog's hind legs. With this cut, the hind legs and behind are shaved. Pompoms can be kept on the hip bones if preferred. The face, legs, feet and tail are also shaved, but there are "bracelets" of fur above each paw and a pompom poof at the end of the tail. The remaining fur stays as is.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
Chih Tzu Groom
You may want to keep your Shih Tzu in a long trim like you see in dog shows or in a short trim which will actually be less work for you and your dog.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
The Puppy
The Puppy cut is used to get dogs used to grooming habits, as well as a standard trim for all dogs. With this cut, the fur is trimmed evenly, but kept at a longer length. Some dogs will be shaved on the face in order to see better. Poodles with a puppy cut are also shaved at the base of the tail, creating a pompom look on the end of the tail.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
The Retriever
The Retriever cut is common for long-haired dogs and curly-haired dogs. This cut is basically shaving the fur to about an inch long, with the face and tail even shorter. The name comes from the fact that this cut is meant to make the fur more manageable, like that of a Golden Retriever. The cut also helps to keep long-haired dogs cool in warmer climates.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
The Lion
The Lion cut is popular with many dogs, and even cats. Pomeranians are most recognizable with the lion cut because the color of their fur resembles that of a lion. The lion cut is when the back half of the dog is shaved very, very short (like a buzz cut) with the tip of the tail left as a pompom. The front half of the dog is left with longer fur and the legs are often shaved down with a pompom around the feet.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
The Teddy Bear
The Teddy Bear cut is similar to the Retriever cut, but longer. The cut is meant to keep the dog cuddly and soft-looking, but also to keep the fur clean and trimmed evenly. This cut for dogs is like "getting a trim" for humans. It's simply for maintenance and clean lines. This cut differs from the Puppy cut in that the fur is kept a little shorter than the Puppy (and longer than the Retriever) and the face and tail are shaved shorter than the rest of the body (also like the Retriever).


DOG and PUPPY haircut
Original & Unique
Many dog owners choose to style their dog's fur in a style that isn't traditional, like a mohawk. Dying dogs' fur has also been done. There are many different cuts suitable for different breeds, based on the breed specifics. Some dogs swim often, and some cuts are better for water speed. Ask your vet or dog groomer for cut recommendations for your dog.


DOG and PUPPY haircut
Yorkshire Terrier
Many owners of pet Yorkies are always asking us about the best way to cut their Yorkie's hair. There are a LOT of options out there.

DOG and PUPPY haircut infographic








DOG SHAVE
HOW TO SHAVE YOUR DOG
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Every year when summer arrives and the days grow longer and hotter, you can't help but notice many people out walking their newly-shaved dogs. You might think that dog shaving is a great idea and can help keep your dog cool. Nature has seen to it that a dog's hair affords him protection from the sun, heat, insects, dirt, and water. Don't undermine the process by shaving him. After all, you wouldn't want to go around wearing a fur coat during the summer. However, it is not a good idea to shave your dog for the summer, for the following reasons:

1. - Dogs' coats are designed to capture air and use it as an insulator. In the winter, this keeps the cold out and holds the heat in. During the summer, this system holds the heat at bay and helps your dog regulate his body temperature. Without this insulating layer of hair, he is susceptible to heat stroke.

2. - Dogs do not cool down the same way that humans do.(When humans are overly warm, our skin perspires and the evaporation of the perspiration helps us to cool down. We have the advantage of perspiring skin over our entire body. In dogs, this evaporative cooling is limited to a very small area - the footpads, which sweat, and the lungs, where panting allows for latent heat to be removed through evaporation. Shaving the coat will have no effect on these areas). Dilated expanded blood vessels in dogs' ears and on their faces carry warm blood closer to the surface of the skin, allowing heat to escape. Again, body shaving will not influence this process.

3. - A dog's fur coat protects him from sunburn and decreases his risk of developing skin cancer. Think of a bald human head at the beach in the sun: a light hat allows the occupant to be cooler and his head better-protected from sun damage. Some other ways to help prevent skin cancer in your dog are:

Keeping him inside when the sun is the brightest during mid-day.

Using pet-specific sunblock on your dog's nose, ear-tips, and stomach if it is hairless.

4. - Shaving a double-coated breed can result in improper re-growth. Many large northern dog breeds such as Labradors, Shepherds, Huskies, and Golden retrievers have two hair coats. The inner, down undercoat is insulating and keeps the dog warm in cold weather and cool in hot weather. This layer is shed regularly. The outer coat, or guard hairs, are coarser, fewer, and longer. They give the dog his color and aren't shed as often. If this type of coat is shaved, the undercoat grows back quickly and sheds normally. However, the guard hairs don't grow out as quickly and sometimes can't grow at all because they are crowded out by the faster-growing undercoat. This can result in color and texture changes in your dog's coat, a patchy appearance to the fur, follicle damage and clogging, and the loss of the weather and water protection that guard hairs provide.

HOW TO SHAVE YOUR DOG
How Can You Help Your Dog Stay Cool?

1. - Provide lots of fresh, cold water

2. - Make sure your dog always has shelter from the sun when he is outdoors.

3. - Don't leave your dog outside in hot weather. Remember that it's easier for you to keep cool than him, so if it's hot for you, it's hotter for him.

4. - Tend to your dog's coat with regular brushing. A clean and fluffed coat is his best defense against the heat. Use a tool that helps remove the undercoat that your dog is naturally shedding due to the warmer weather. These are excellent products:

Zoom Groom by Kong is an excellent bathing tool. This rubber body brush helps massage your dog's skin, scrubs in the shampoo, and stimulates circulation to the hair follicles. Here is a great video about the Zoom Groom:

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


Jorvet T-Shaped Undercoat Rake is a wonderful tool for effectively removing loose undercoat in double-coated dogs.

Dog Body Brush with Shampoo Applicator is another body brush that also dispenses shampoo.

Fur-buster De-shedding Tool has stainless steel blades that removes loose undercoat while fluffing the remaining fur and promoting good air circulation.








DOG HAIR COAT WOOL FUR - DOG GROOMING TIPS & GUIDE
DOG GROOMING GUIDE
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Rick

How to train your dog to sit still during grooming

In order to get your dog to sit still during grooming there are four important training sections:

Standing
Sit-Stay
Distraction Training
Grooming & Nail Clipping Acceptation


DOG HAIR COAT WOOL FUR - DOG GROOMING TIPS & GUIDE

According to Rick of Wiggly Tails - a dog groomer in Perth. It is important to start early with this training. Don't start a day before the first grooming session! As with anything, it takes time to train your beloved dog.

Standing
Training your dog to enjoy their grooming session at an early age is a must for pet owners. You can make this a positive experience for your dog by training them when they are young pups. Several basic commands that are important to a pet owner and often taught during puppy training are the sit, stand and come commands. In addition to grooming, the stand command can also come in handy if you show your dog or attend rally classes. Begin the exercise by asking your dog to sit. With a treat in hand, move the morsel forward toward your body. When your dog stands to sample the treat, praise them and give the snack as the reward. Practise the exercise until they master the command. Because the groomer will need to beautify different areas of their body, you can cue them on the stand-stay command. This allows them sufficient time to go over the dog and ensure that they are perfectly coiffed. Gently pat and touch different areas on their body to get them used to the movements.

Sit-Stay
Whether your dog is getting a haircut, nails trimmed, fur blown dry or bathed, they are going to need to be kept calm. You can help your dog through the process by teaching them how to sit still. Positive reinforcement through praise, petting or a treat are all popular training methods. You can begin by placing your dog in the sit position for short amounts of time. If they perform this task, they get the reward. If they break form, they are placed back into the sit position. As your dog progresses, increase the amount time that they need to sit before they are rewarded. If your dog is older or has health complications, they may be more comfortable in the down stay position. Practise the same drills using treats, praise or belly rubs.

Preparing Your Pup for Distractions
Because your dog will have an assortment of grooming needs throughout their lives, you want to get them used to an assortment of distractions. If your dog is scared or breaks their sit-stay suddenly, it could put both them and groomer at risk. This is especially important when your dog is getting their nails trimmed. As your dog is in the sit-stay command, find activities that will distract them and break their position. If your dog loves to fetch, bounce a tennis ball past them while sitting. If they show signs of going after the balls, place them back in the sit-stay position. For dogs who fail to break the command, you can reward them positively with a treat. Other forms of distraction during their sit-stay include walking around the room, greeting friends and making loud noises. If your dog gets nervous or excited, practise this exercise until it no longer causes them anxiety or stress.

Training Your Dog to Stay and Accept Grooming
Keeping your dogs nails trimmed and hair cut is an important part of the grooming process. You can begin by teaching your dog to accept being brushed by keeping the sessions short and comforting. Look for a brush where the bristles are soft and feel welcoming against the puppies face and torso. As you move along their body, gently pick up each paw and touch it with the brush. Give the dog belly rubs, praise and a treat as positive reinforcement. Since their groin, paws and underarms are sensitive areas, be extra gentle when manoeuvring the brush. Touching their paws with gentle games of "got your paw" can prove helpful when it's time for your dog to get their nails trimmed. After the nail trimming session, offer praise and treats as their reward for good behaviour.








DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health
DOG FUR & PEOPLE CLOTHING
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Doume Jalat-Dehen of Brittany, France creates custom coats, sweaters, and hats for dog owners using the fur gathered from their beloved pets (the stuff that results from shedding and brushing). Photographer Erwan Fichou decided to base one of his photo projects around the furry fashions. His series Dogwool features portraits of these owners wearing Jalat-Dehen's creations, standing besides the animals the materials were gathered from. The portraits were captured across France and Belgium. VICE Magazine writes, It takes about seven years to gather enough dog hair for a sweater. First of all, you can't just pull the fur out out! That's inhumane, plus it's cheating. You just have to brush your dog regularly and save what comes off. Then you mail your precious collection of Rover fur to Doume and she will return it to you in a 50-gram ball of dog wool.

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

HOW TO MAKE A YARN
FROM DOG FUR
Did you know that you can knit dog fur into sweaters and blankets? Some people have an automatic knee jerk reaction to that idea. We typically think of dog fur as something that is both dirty and a nuisance, but it doesn't have to be that way. I think most folks just need a moment to let the idea sink in, since it's not something that the average person has considered. In reality though, it's no stranger than knitting with wool.

DOG and PUPPY coat & skin health

The only reason why it's never become commonplace, is that it's not very economical. Most dogs can't produce the same amount of material as sheep, and their diet is more expensive, so farmers never used dogs. Thus, the public was never introduced to the idea. Some think it's stylish and quirky while others just want a nice memento to remember their pet by after it dies. But what makes this idea so intriguing to me, is that dog fur is ridiculously warm. While it varies depending on the breed, everyone who has tried it agrees that dog fur is warmer than wool, with most estimates placing it at around 2 to 8 times warmer. And best of all, you can wash it without worrying shrinkage.

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


I should mention a few important details that weren't included in the video. First of all, the fur needs to be a certain length. 2 inches is considered the best. Anything less than that, and the yarn won't be very strong. You should also know that it's not a good idea to shave your dog. You'll wind up with stubble that is mixed in with the long hairs. The best way to get the hair is by brushing the dog's coat. And finally, it's important to actually shampoo the hair after you collect it. This will not only remove the smell, but will make the yarn safe for people who are allergic to dogs.

DOG FUR HAIR KNITT BOOK

And if you're interested in learning some of the finer details of dog fur knitting, you'd should check out DOG FUR HAIR KNITT BOOK
Knitting With Dog Hair Book
which is the best, and probably only, book on the subject.









BEST TOP DOG COAT FUR HAIR REMOVAL TOOLS
BEST DOG HAIR
REMOVAL TOOLS

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For animal lovers, pet hair and pet hair removal are just a fact of life. It's one of those small inconveniences we accept as part of the doggy deal alongside muddy paw prints on the kitchen floor and slobbery kisses when you know exactly where that mouth has been. This list of tried and true dog hair removal tools has something for everyone, from premium appliances to some simple household hacks. Whether you are dealing with long hair or short fur, these tools will help you get the best dog fur in your home.

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH HOW TO GROOM A DOG !!!


1. Sticky Lint RollerThe classic. Relatively inexpensive and easy to use, the only downside is that these handy rollers don't stand up to de-hairing the entire living room in one go, and are best suited to small jobs like cleaning off your work clothes on your way out the door. $6 on Amazon.com. Less expensive hack? Sticky tape wrapped around your hand will remove pet hair from carpet, clothes, furniture, and soft surfaces far more cheaply than the sticky roll tapes of a pet hair roller.

2. Evercare Pet Mega Cleaning RollerThis thing is like a lint roller on steroids, definitely a pet parent must-have. With a 3' long handle and a giant, super-sticky roller, it works sort of like a duster, only it really traps hair. We like it for furniture, and also for low-pile carpets and rugs. Note that it's not great for a deeper or shag carpet. $56 on Amazon

3. Grooming and Deshedding GloveA dog grooming tool and surface cleaner all in one, this has the added benefit of looking like some kind of science fiction prop. Just pet your dog with the glove to give her a shiny coat, and then pick up stray hair from the furniture with the same petting motion. $9 on Amazon

4. FUR-D Duo Fur RemoverThis is my personal favorite dog grooming tool/fur remover brush for quick clean-up around the house. Two sizes of rubber pet hair capturing bristles bigger bristles can be used to brush your dog's coat and remove loose fur before it has the chance to get stuck to your stuff, and the finer bristles are perfect for brushing hair off the upholstery. Plus, it comes in cute colors! $5.98 on Amazon

5. FURemover BroomRubber brooms like this are a staple in doggy daycare for their strong hair-gathering ability. The sweeper version of the FURemover is effective on several surfaces, so you can de-hair the carpeted living room and the tiled kitchen in one go, and the long handle means you can work the pet hair out of your rugs from a standing position. Plus, it's a multi-tasker with uses far beyond pet hair removal: After you clean up after your dog, you can use the FURemover broom to scrub the bathroom tile or wash the car! $20 on Amazon

6. KONG ZoomGroomThis is a cute little dog grooming tool with stiff but gentle rubber bristles that remove loose hair and stimulate dogs' skin for a healthy, shiny coat. I use ZoomGrooms regularly for gentle brushing, and at bath time to help work shampoo through my dogs' coats. $4.79 on Amazon

7. Pick It Up MittWe love a wearable tool, and pet hair removal mitts are affordable and effective for gathering pet hair off of fabric. I don't know what magic material these gloves are made from, but they have soft have little nubs that pick up pet hair, and are easily cleaned by rubbing two mitts together in opposite directions. Mitts are great for removing hair from more delicate clothing, as the soft material means your clothes won't be pulled or pilled from abrasion. This lint brush works well for pet hair and everyday cleanup and dusting, too. $10 on Amazon

8. Pledge Fabric SweeperThis uses two rollers to lift and trap pet hair, and the attached handle/hair trapper can be emptied between rounds. Online reviewers rave about the efficiency of this handheld tool, and it's easy to find in most major stores. I like it best for cleaning up pillows and couch cushions.

9. Dyson Animal Upright Vacuum CleanerThe Cadillac of pet hair removal tools, and my fantasy appliance, the Dyson Animal has powerful suction and best of all, a tangle-free turbine tool to remove dirt and hair from carpets and upholstery. There are other competent pet hair vacuums on the market, but this bad boy is the dream. $468 on Amazon

10. Shark Rotator Professional Lift-AwayThe Rotator is a quality everyday vacuum that gets the job done, and it-s often on sale for less than $190. If you are not ready to splurge on a Dyson, the Shark Rotator is the vacuum for you. Though it's not billed as being specifically for pet hair cleanup, it gets rave reviews from pet owners for its hair-annihilating properties. It's lightweight, easy to maneuver, and easy to clean. $170 on Amazon

11. FURminatorIf the Dyson Pet is the Cadillac of pet hair vacuum cleaners, then this is the Porsche of dog grooming tools: compact, powerful, efficient, and worth every penny. The Furminator helps keep your dog's coat in great shape, and reduces shedding by removing loose fur from the undercoat before it has a chance to hit your furniture. Used appropriately on the right dog, the Furminator can help prevent excess hair mess and minimize your need for other tools on this list. $27 on Amazon

12. Rubber GlovesHere it is, the unbelievable, incredible, household object life hack that will make pet hair cleanup a breeze: a plain old rubber glove. Put on a pair of basic grocery store dish gloves, get them just barely damp or even go dry, and go to town on your fur-covered sofa, rug, or pants. At a certain point you just roll over and accept the dog hair that creeps onto every surface in your home. As long as the dog is around, the hair will be, too. Still, it's helpful to have a toolbox to turn to when cleaning time rolls around. Feel free to leave your favorite dog hair removal tools & tips in the comments, and happy spring cleaning!









DOG and PUPPY haircut
DOG BREED GROOMING GUIDE
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DOG and PUPPY haircut
DOG BREED GROOMING GUIDE
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DOG and PUPPY haircut
DOG GROOMING STYLE
BY HAIR TYPES

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WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


DOG and PUPPY haircut infogram

DOG and PUPPY haircut

How to groom

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


How to groom with a clippers

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


How to groom LONG-HAIRED dog

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


How to groom SHORT-HAIRED dog

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


How to desh

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WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


How to color LARGE dogs fur

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WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!









DOG and PUPPY haircut
DOG GROOMING TIPS
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Dogs are typically not very patient when you groom them so keep the sessions short. Offer your pet treats to keep them still and calm.

Your grooming should start when the pet is still a puppy. As he grows older, it will be easier to get through the grooming sessions.

DOG and PUPPY haircut

Follow positive reinforcement techniques (like petting and talking in a sweet voice). This makes the grooming sessions pleasant and helps him feel more comfortable during veterinary procedures too.

Does your dog need a bath? How often you bathe your dog depends upon his lifestyle. The more active he is, the more bathing he will require. Generally speaking, a dog should not be bathed more than once a week. On the other hand, he shouldn't go more than 4-6 weeks without a bath (unless you like a smelly house!).

Brush your dog after a bath while he is still wet. It's easier to get the excess hair out. Then brush again when he is dry.

Many owners forget to brush their dog's teeth. Don't forget! It's really important! Get some dog toothpaste and a dog toothbrush at your local vet. Place toothpaste on the toothbrush and gently rub your dog's teeth in a circular motion (just like you would brush your own teeth!). Don't forget those back teeth where plaque builds up.

A dog's nails need to be trimmed every few months, depending on how active he is. Trimming a dog's nails can be dangerous and painful if it is done incorrectly. We suggest leaving this for a trained professional. But if you must cut your dog's nails at home, be sure to use a proper nail cutting tool and cut away from the bloodline.








DOG and PUPPY haircut
HOW TO CHOOSE
GOOD DOG GROOMER

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As with choosing your own hairstylist, looking in the yellow pages isn't the recommended method. You could find yourself contracted with Edward Scissorhands, or the last man on earth that still embraces the mullet. Likewise, the yellow pages and strip mall signs are not good methods for quality decision making. Compile a list of potential groomers and visit each one, taking the following factors into consideration. When choosing your dog groomer consider these important elements:

Cleanliness: Do the staff clean up after each dog's procedure? Are cages kept free of urine and feces? If the smell in the facility is offensive, I would assume the service to be the same. When you patronize a substandard grooming facility, you risk the infection of your dog's skin or worse.

Humane Treatment: Are the animals in the groomer's care treated with a nurturing and patient manner? Are the handlers gentle? Are dogs and cats housed in separate areas? Are cages large enough to accommodate the animals in them? And are dogs under automatic blow dryers monitored, to prevent burning? If, during your visit, the staff at the facility does not seem to be enamored with their furry clients, then imagine how they treat them while not under your scrutiny.

Good Lighting and Organization:Is the facility well-lit? Are work areas well-spaced and organized? If more than one groomer works at a time, does each one have sufficient space to move around his or her workspace? If the groomer is cramped, expected to operate with substandard equipment, or under insufficient lighting, no one can honestly expect the results to be dynamic.

Finished Product: Visit during regular business hours so that you can assess the quality of the hairstyles exiting. Would you be satisfied if your dog were donning the same quality? Crooked cuts and skin nicks are good reasons to cross a groomer's office off your list.

Particular Breed Results: If your dog is of the Terrier persuasion, do not make a decision based on a Golden Retriever's bath and clip. Some groomers specialize in particular breeds, and likewise, some shy away from certain breeds because they do not have the experience or the desire to perform a certain style. Be specific about your dog's breed and the clip style that you fancy. Ask for pictures, and decide for yourself.

Vaccinations: Choose a groomer who requires all canine clients to sport vaccination records - like Rabies and Bordatella (Kennel Cough). This will protect all animals, including yours, that share a space while in the facility.

Familiarize Yourself: Take a few minutes to ask the manager or staff questions involving time required for a visit, appointment availability, cost, pick-up and delivery procedures, and complete services offered.

Tranquilizers: If your dog is of the anxious sort, and will require a tranquilizer for his appointment, ask your groomer if they will administer it. Many will not (unless they're affiliated with a veterinary office), but will accept an animal that has been tranquilized by a veterinarian and transported to the groomer's office.


DOG and PUPPY haircut

Additionally, network with your dog's veterinarian, kennel, pet supply retailer, breeder, and pet owner friends for recommendations. Clients who have had a bad experience will talk and so will those who've been satisfied. Rumors travel fast, but so does a good word about a quality product.

You can expect to pay $40 to $60 for your dog's visit to a professional groomer. Of course, that price can vary. Urban locales tend to be pricier. Mobile dog grooming services' prices are a bit higher, but so is their convenience factor. And, of course, heavy matting and complex cuts will add bucks to your bill. Whether you chance the groomer next door, or travel three towns south, a finicky attitude is central to grooming success.








DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!
HOW TO REMOVE FUR MATTS
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Matted dog hair may be one of the worst grooming issues a dog owner can experience. It's caused by excess loose hair that gets unbearably tangled. Getting rid of mats is painful for both of you, so what you really need to invest your time in is preventing matting. Here is how:

1. Make sure your dog has the right diet
You are what you eat, and so is your dog. Feed it a healthy, balanced diet rich in omega 3s - yep! they are just as good for your dog as they are for you. The omega 3s will help with any allergies or skin conditions that can cause difficulty while combing or bathing, which can lead to matting. You can even give your fur baby a daily dose of fish oil, but ask your vet what the best dosage is for your dog's size.

2. Bathe your dog regularly
As long as you've been regularly combing your dog, regular bathing is key. Bathe it at least once a month, more frequently if matting becomes a serious issue.

3. Try a detangler
Use a good detangling shampoo and conditioner when giving your dog a bath, and when the bath is over, you can spritz it down with tangle prevention sprays like The Stuff for Dogs for a little extra protection.

4. Brush regularly
Between baths, do brush and comb regularly - don't forget the legs, chest, underarms and tummy. Those can mat, too, and may tend to do so more easily in some breeds. Treat it just like human hair in some ways, sectioning it out when you brush it. Do it a minimum of once a week, but if you notice lots of knots in its fur, it's best to do it more often. It will be easier for you and less stressful or painful for your pup. It may get more necessary with age as it grooms itself less frequently.

5. Choose the right brush
Steer clear of those cheap pin brushes with plastic nubs on the ends. They can get tangled in human hair, so they aren't much better for dogs. If you have a real matting problem, don't expect the local pet supply store - chain or not, to have the brush you need. Look online for the stuff the pros use. Spend some cash on a really good nub free slicker brush and follow it up with a combing for good measure. You can reapply the detangling spray if necessary.

6. Use thinning shears
If you get a mat you can't get out, don't shave your pup. Consider using thinning shears to selectively work on that area until the mat itself falls out.

CHECK THE GUIDE:
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MATTED DOG HAIR & FUR
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ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG
ALBINISM IN DOGS
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There are two main types of albinism:
Oculocutaneous - eyes, skin, and hair.
Ocular - just eyes.

There are also different levels of albinism, and different types within those two classifications. In fact, until recently, a lot of people denied they even existed. Sure, white dogs are everywhere!

But albino dogs aren't just white - they a complete or almost complete lack of pigment in the fur, skin, eyes, and nose. True albino dogs with no pigment at all are extremely rare.

ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

In 1976, a white female Doberman Pinscher named Padula's Queen Shebah was born to two black and rust parents. Shebah was bred to her son to produce more white Dobermans. Since then, several thousand Dobermans, many of them white, have descended from Shebah. Although they are called white, they are actually light cream, with blue eyes and pink nose, lips and eye rims. The Doberman Pinscher Club of America (DPCA), backed by several geneticists, contended they were albinos. But many of their breeders insisted they weren't because they didn't fit the image of the prototypical albino with white fur and pink eyes.

ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

Dobermans are the only breed in which albinos appear to be purposefully bred, very much against the wishes of the DPCA. They squint in bright light, and they're prone to sunburn, which may lead to skin tumors. A recent study (Winkler PA, Gornik KR, Ramsey DT, Dubielzig RR, Venta PJ, et al. (2014) found albino Dobes had a much higher incidence of eye and skin melanocytic tumors than normally pigmented Dobes.

ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY
What Causes Albinism?
A completely pure white animal with pink eyes and pale pink skin is considered albino, and is technically referred to as tyrosinase-negative. Tyrosinase is an enzyme involved in melanin production, and melanin is the natural substance that gives color (or pigment) to the eyes, skin, and hair. Albinism is a lack or defect of this enzyme and is caused by a recessive gene that is inherited from both parents. Many true albino dogs will suffer from deafness because the unpigmented skin in the ear canal causes the nerve endings to degenerate.

ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

The truth is, more than 60 different gene mutations in various species are known to cause albinism, often with slightly different effects. Light fur with blue eyes is typical of the most common type of albinism, oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2), in humans. It is now acknowledged that white Dobermans are in fact albinos, and the causative gene has recently been discovered.

The mutation is not a part of any of the known dog color loci. This includes the C series, where mutations causing albinism in many others species, including cats, rats and mice, have been identified. However, mutations in SLC45A2 cause the OCA4 type of albinism responsible for cream-colored Bengal tigers, horses, and gorillas, as well as some albino humans.

ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

But Dobes are not the only breed with albinos. Pekingese seem to have the second largest number, but they have also been seen in Shih Tzu, Poodles, Pit Bulls, Beagles, Pugs, Dachshunds and doubtless, many others. In the few individuals tested, they don't seem to share the same mutant gene with the albino Dobes, nor do they seem to share the C-series allele seen in so many other domestic albino animals. In no breed is the purposeful breeding of these dogs encouraged. Nonetheless, if you have one, they make fine companions but you need to take steps to keep them from being dazzled by bright light or from getting sunburned.

ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

Despite the fact that albinism is equally rare among all vertebrates from humans to fish and birds, the real albino dogs are even rarer due to two reasons. The first reason is that the most "albino" dogs pictures on the internet depicting pretty normal dogs with white fur. The second one, it's a bit hard to figure out if your dog is real albino.









WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY
WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS
PARTIAL ALBINISM IN DOGS

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HOW TO DISTINGUISH
WHITE vs ALBINO DOG ?

Tip #1 - Inspect the dog's coat. If the dog is predominantly white, but has some brown or black fur around the nose or feet, the dog is not an albino. The albino dog is unable to produce hair color of any kind.

Tip #2 - Spread the fur and look at the dog's skin. Many dogs have mottled skin with large colored patches beneath their fur. These are normal skin colorations and prove that the dog has the ability to produce melanin, the key component in skin coloration. Albinos lack the ability to produce melanin.

Tip #3 - Look at the dog's eyes. If the iris of the eyes is brown, the dog has normal melanin distribution. If the iris of the eyes is pink, the dog is an albino. The iris appears pink because the eyes lack the pigment to shelter the blood vessels of the eye.

WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

Albinism is rare in all animals, including dogs, and many people easily confuse white-coated dogs, or dogs that exhibit forms of albinism, for albinos. True albinism is a genetic condition in which pigmentation of eyes, coat, and skin is completely absent. An important distinction to draw between dogs with white coats and albino dogs is that white-coated dogs produce the color white, while albinos only appear white due to lack of pigmentation.

WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

All-white dogs have genetic markers by virtue of which the white pigment masks, or suppresses, all other colors. Albinism, on the other hand, is caused by the absence of both melanin and the enzymes that produce it. That said, some dogs exhibit characteristics of albinism without being true albinos. Let's explore the distinctions, as plainly and legibly as possible, and see what makes an albino dog an albino.

WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY
Partial albinism in dogs
Some dogs may appear to be true albinos, but retain some pigmentation, which will be most noticeable on the nose or stomach. We can call this partial albinism, but there is actually a range of melanins, and as such, a wide variety of albinisms are possible and observable in dogs. Eyes and skin of albino dogs may appear pink, but it is the diffused color of blood vessels:

WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

In cases of partial albinism, dogs produce only a small amount of melanin, sufficient to produce limited coloration. With the exception of small areas of pigmentation, whether in eyes, skin, or coat, what remains will retain that extremely pale, color-drained appearance.


WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY
Coat patterns confused with albinism
Instances of limited coloration in non-albino dogs produces two coat patterns, each producing limited color swatches on a dog's coat and skin. These patterns are known in breed standards and kennel clubs as "piebald" and "merle." Piebald dogs have mostly white-colored coats that display large spots or patches of dark coloration. Merle-coated dogs exhibit splotches or patches of color, not only on the coat, but on the skin as well.

WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

Dogs with merle coats are also prone to having heterochromatic, or different-colored, eyes. As in white cats, the genes responsible for coat color, eye, and ear health are not causally linked, so white and albino dogs are not necessarily more likely to be born blind or deaf. However, a rare genetic combination, known as "double merle", does carry inherent health risks. Double merle dogs, like Keller in the photo above, may be mistaken for albino dogs. Unlike true albino dogs, who, aside from light sensitivity, are generally healthy, double-merle-coated dogs are at higher risk for both deafness and blindness. This beautiful dog is Keller, a double merle Australian Shepherd. Her owner writes very movingly about the difficulties and health issues of double merle dogs, not to be confused with albinos:

WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY
Light sensitivity in albino dogs
Melanin serves a number of uses in the body aside from providing pigmentation. In the eyes, the presence of melanin is one thing that allows dogs to process and filter light. For a true albino dog, without melanin or without much, direct sunlight causes pain in their eyes which makes them squint. True albino dogs should get minimal and carefully managed exposure to direct sunlight.

WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

Light filtration is not the only purpose for melanin. With regard to the skin and body, it provides natural protection from the sun, as well as contributing to the body's ability to fight off infection. Further, albino dogs are far more prone to sunburn and to developing skin cancers due to their extreme photosensitivity.


WHITE vs ALBINO DOGS, ALBINISM IN DOGS, ALBINO DOG and PUPPY

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DOG SMELL and SNIFF
ODOURLESS DOG BREEDS
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Alaskan Klee Kai (minimal)
Alaskan Malamute (minimal)
Australian Silky Terrier (little \ none)
Australian Labradoodle (little \ none)
Basenji (little \ none)
Bichon Frise (little \ none)
Belgian Shepherd - Groenendael (minimal)
Belgian Shepherd - Laekenois (minimal)
Belgian Shepherd - Malinois (minimal)
Belgian Shepherd - Tervuren (minimal)
Bolognese (little \ none)
Boston Terrier (little \ none)
Bracco Italiano (little \ none \ moderate)
Bull Terrier (minimal)
Bull Terrier, Miniature (minimal)
Cavoodle (minimal)
Chinese Crested (minimal)
Chinese Shar - Pei (little \ none \ moderate)
Cockerpoo (little \ none \ average)
Coton de Tulear (little \ none)
Dalmatian (little \ none)
Goldendoodle (little \ none \ average)
Greyhound, Italian (little \ none)
Havanese (little \ none)
Japanese Spitz (little \ none)
Keeshond (little \ none)
Labradoodle (little \ none \ average)
Lhasa Apso (little \ none)
Lowchen (little \ none)
Maltese (little \ none)
Morkie (little \ none)
Norwegian Elkhound (minimal)
Papillon (little \ none)
Phalene (little \ none)
Pomeranian (little \ none)
Poodle, Miniature (little \ none)
Poodle, Standard (little \ none)
Poodle, Toy (little \ none)
Samoyed (little \ none)
Schnauzer, Giant (little \ none)
Schnauzer, Miniature (little \ none)
Schnauzer, Standard (little \ none)
Schnoodle (minimal)
Shetland Sheepdog (little \ none)
Siberian Husky (little \ none)
Tibetan Spaniel (little \ none)
Tibetan Terrier (little \ none)
Yorkiepoo (minimal)
Yorkshire Terrier (little \ none)

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The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds
THE 10 STINKIEST DOG BREEDS
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BassetHound

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Prone to bloat and gassiness, the Basset Hound is also prone to dog odor. Shampooing is an option, but too many baths will dry out their skin.


Cocker Spaniel

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Although this breed (both the American and English varieties) are plagued with several genetic faults, one that isn't commonly known is their overwhelming dog odor.


Beagle

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Another hound on the list, the Beagle is one who is prone to a particular doggy odor that seems to permeate the entire yard.


Pug

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Although the Pug has a short coat, the folds on their faces need careful cleaning to keep from dirt and infection. These breeds are also prone to extreme gassiness.


Bloodhound

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Between the long floppy ears that need routine cleaning and the oiled coat that retains a constant dog scent, Bloodhounds are a laid back potpourri of scents and the only scents that don't seem to interest them.


Yorkshire Terrier

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Between their coats that need constant grooming and the genetic predisposition to tooth decay, a Yorkie needs special care to keep smelling like a rose.


English Bulldog

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

It’s commonly known this dog is riddled with skin problems, which may contribute to some not so pleasant smelling fur. But these barrel chested dogs also emit lethal flatulence that may bring a grown man to tears.


Chinese Shar Pei

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Shar Pei's also suffer from hereditary skin ailments, that have nothing to do with their many folds. Owners need to be diligent in cleaning this breed, the folds may begin to reek if not cleaned properly.


Boxer

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

Boxers are notorious for the noxious gasses they emit. Other than their room clearing abilities, the boxer doesn't have any other type of "doggy" odor.


Saint Bernard

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

These dogs are notorious droolers, which get down into their coat, causing it to smell. Also prone to skin problems and gassiness, the St. Bernard could be considered a triple threat.


Shepherd

The 10 Stinkiest Dog Breeds

And finally, most of Shepperd breeds are stinky as hell, while you grow them up at home.








DOG and PUPPY coat and fur SHEDDING!
UNIQUE DOG COAT PATTERN
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Domestic dogs have been bred to become the most diverse species on the planet, and come in a dizzying array of body shapes and sizes, ear shapes, nose lengths, and coat colors. This is quite an achievement considering that most of the 400 or so dog breeds in existence have been around for only a few hundred years.

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But even with all this variety, we occasionally encounter dogs that are so unique in their appearance that we have to pause and admire their beauty. Some of these coat markings are the result of a rare genetic variations or conditions such as vitiligo and piebaldism, but that doesn't make these dogs any less stunning.

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR

DOG COAT, FUR, WOOL, HAIR








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EXTREME DOG FUR ARTWORK
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