DOGICA® DOG PHOTOWALL
PLAY DOGICA® FREE ONLINE DOG GAMES

PLAY DOGICA® FREE ONLINE DOG GAMES

ADD DOGICA® TO FAVORITES
GO TO PAGE...
GO TO PAGE...


NEVER USE A REMEDY / SELF-TREATMENT ON YOUR DOG
WITHOUT BEING ADVISED BY VETERINARY PHYSICIAN

SAVE YOUR POOCH !!! (image (c) FRED-H)


NEVER USE A REMEDY / SELF-TREATMENT ON YOUR DOG
WITHOUT BEING ADVISED BY VETERINARY PHYSICIAN

SAVE YOUR POOCH !!! (image (c) FRED-H)
DOGICA® SUPPORT

DOGICA® RULES, AGREEMENT & POLICY

All images on DOGICA® pages
used only as illustrations and respectfully
belong to its legal rights owners !!!

Find the author of any image with TINEYE toolFind the author of any image with TINEYE tool
If you are a legal rights owner and would like
to add, update or remove your material.

By using this site you are agree on:
The information contained in or provided
through DOGICA® site is intended for general
consumer understanding and education only
and is not intended to be and is not a substitute
for professional advice.Use of this site and any
information contained on or provided through
this site is at your own risk and any information
contained on or provided through this site
is provided on an "as is" basis without any
representations or warranties or pay.
ABOUT DOGICA®DOGICA® F.A.QDOGICA® RULES, AGREEMENT & POLICYDOGICA® SUPPORT CONTACT DOGICA®
DOGICA® Cookies Policy and Regulations
DOGICA® SUPPORT

DOGICA® RULES, AGREEMENT & POLICY

All images on DOGICA® pages
used only as illustrations and respectfully
belong to its legal rights owners !!!

Find the author of any image with TINEYE toolFind the author of any image with TINEYE tool
If you are a legal rights owner and would like
to add, update or remove your material.

By using this site you are agree on:
The information contained in or provided
through DOGICA® site is intended for general
consumer understanding and education only
and is not intended to be and is not a substitute
for professional advice.Use of this site and any
information contained on or provided through
this site is at your own risk and any information
contained on or provided through this site
is provided on an "as is" basis without any
representations or warranties or pay.
ABOUT DOGICA®DOGICA® F.A.QDOGICA® RULES, AGREEMENT & POLICYDOGICA® SUPPORT CONTACT DOGICA®
DOGICA® Cookies Policy and Regulations
DOGICA® DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD
DOGICA® DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD
SALE at DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD               BUY at DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD
DOGICA® DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD

DOGICA® DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD
DOGICA® DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD
SALE at DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD               BUY at DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD
DOGICA® DOG and PUPPY SALES BOARD

DOG SOCIAL ICONS

Please, Notice - DOGICA® OWNS NO ANY OFFICIAL ACCOUNTS AT ANY SOCIAL NETWORKS !



DOG SOCIAL ICONS

Please, Notice - DOGICA® OWNS NO ANY OFFICIAL ACCOUNTS AT ANY SOCIAL NETWORKS !



GET A DOG !
Watch dog and puppy video
GET A DOG !
Watch dog and puppy video
DOGICA® BLOG

DOGICA® DOG & PUPPY CHATDOGICA® BLOGDOGICA®  DOG FORUMDOGICA® GUESTBOOK

DOGICA® BLOG

DOGICA® DOG & PUPPY CHATDOGICA® BLOGDOGICA®  DOG FORUMDOGICA® GUESTBOOK

DOGICA® PAGE FOR DOG !
Music for dogs © by WWW.RELAXMYDOG.COM

TV for dogs (WWW.DOGTV.COM)
DOGICA® PAGE FOR DOG !
Music for dogs © by WWW.RELAXMYDOG.COM

TV for dogs (WWW.DOGTV.COM)
BARRYMORE
BARRYMORE

0%

DOGICA® is loading!
SEARCH...

SEARCH DOGSEARCH DOGICA®SEARCH ON THIS PAGESEARCH DOGICA® FORUM
GO TO PAGE...
STATISTICS


DOGICA® STATISTICS
DOGICA® DOG FORUM
DOGICA® DOG & PUPPY CHAT

GO FULLSCREEN!

CHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICON
CHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICONCHANGE DOGICA® ICON
CHANGE DOGICA® SKIN
CHOOSE YOUR PAW 


DOGICA® THE POOCHIE GAME


Here is DOGICA - intelligent, cute, talented and loyal pooch! (o:
She can walk, play, sit, lie down and roll over. Try to pet her and watch
how she responds. Entertain her by playing ball or giving her a bone.
Reward a canine with a treat! To get her to sit, double-click your mouse
on the ground close to her. Double-click again to get her to lie down,
then hold mouse button down,make a circular motion to roll the dog over
DOGICA® ONLINE DOG GOODIES & SUPPLIES SHOP
DOGICA® ONLINE DOG GOODIES & SUPPLIES SHOP
DOGICA® PRICELISTSHOPPING CART \ CHECKOUTWISHLIST
SECURE PAYMENT BY PAYPAL

SEND DOGICA TO FRIEND by E-MAIL!


DOGICA® DOG & PUPPY SITES CATALOG

DOGICA® DOG & PUPPY SITES CATALOG





















Copyright by Barrymore, Kai Levy and ZERenish © 2014
DOG NAIL & CLAWS
DOGICA® 3D World of Dog & Puppy

DOG NAIL & CLAWS















DOG NAIL & CLAWS
















Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish
Dog ToeNails and Claws
Dog Nail Clippers, Trimmers
Polish Dog Nail and Claws
Bleeding Injured Dog Nail Care & First Aid
How to Clean Dog Nails - Q-tips
Dog Nail Structure: Quick, Dew
Dog Nail Disorders, First Aid, Care
Dog Nail Art
Dog Paws


I WANT MY BANNER HERE!
  • THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING DOG LOVERS COMMUNITY WORLDWIDE !
  • THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING DOG LOVERS COMMUNITY WORLDWIDE !
  • THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING DOG LOVERS COMMUNITY WORLDWIDE !
  • THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING DOG LOVERS COMMUNITY WORLDWIDE !
  • THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING DOG LOVERS COMMUNITY WORLDWIDE !










Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL STRUCTURE
This article proudly presented by
WWW.PETFROOMER.COM
and
WWW.DOGSNATURALLYMAGAZINE.COM

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

DEW CLAWS
About 1' to 3' above the inside of their front feet and sometimes rear fee, dogs may have "5th nails" commonly referred to "dew claws." Nail clipping should include these nails. Since dew claws are never exposed to friction from touching ground surfaces, they are often longer and sometimes overgrown. In fact, you may find neglected dew claws grown into a full circle circle and even painfully ingrown requiring veterinary care. It is not uncommon for pets to have dew claws on some feet, and not on others.


Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

THE QUICK
There is a blood vessel in pet dog and cat nails. It is commonly referred to as "the quick." The quick is usually visible to the eye except for dark-colored nails. Because it is possible to cut the quick and cause a nail to bleed, many pet owners are fearful of cutting their pet's nails. Instead, they bring their dogs to groomers or veterinarians for clipping.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

If the quick is already very near nail tips, daily filing for approximately three weeks may encourage nail quicks to recede enough for a comfortable, bloodless nail clipping. However, the recession during those three weeks is likely to be enough to clip the tips of the nails without bleeding.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Inform the pet owner if they will continue to file the pet's nail several times a week, you will be able to clip the nails a little shorter each time until they have properly receded and avoid discomfort caused by overly long nails. Thereafter, the nails should be clipped and filed on a regular basis in order to maintain their healthy state, and prevent the pet from having to undergo bleeding nails. There is almost no risk of causing the nails to bleed when filing them.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Indoor dogs typically require more frequent nail inspections. Outdoor dogs or those taken for regular walks on hard surfaces like concrete sidewalks usually require less maintenance since the friction of their nails against hard surfaces helps to limit nail growth and encourage quicks to properly recede away from nail tips.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

What's inside your dog's toenail?
On the left, the interior structures are shown, along with the suggested angle to remove the "roof" of the nail, while not harming the sensitive quick. On a black claw, the interface between sensitive and insensitive nail is usually chalky and white, very easy to discern. On the right is a close-up view of the inside of the nail. On cross section, the sensitive quick will look translucent and glossy, like living flesh. In untrimmed claws, there will often be a "notch" below the tip of the quick. It is usually safe to initiate your angled cut at the notch.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and ClippingDog Nails, Claws, Trimming and ClippingDog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

Some dogs act like cutting their nails is their worst nightmare. This may be a learned behavior from their painful, overstimulated toes, which will slowly dissipate along with the pain once the nails are short. Use all your best restraint and behavior modification tricks to get through the initial phase, whether your dog is a squirmer or a drama queen.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

Start on the hind feet, because the nails tend to be a little shorter and less sensitive than the front. But remember you can't make an accurate cut on a moving target so get help from your dog trainer or groomer if needed. Make nail trimming "quality time" you spend with your dog. Lots of kisses, lots of treats and a positive attitude go a long way. If you dread it, your dog will too, so learn how to be a good actor until you succeed in believing it can be a loving experience for you both. If your dog loses patience quickly, try cutting one nail a day. As long as you keep the order of toes consistent, this will be a good maintenance schedule, giving every toe a trim every 16 days. Short toenails are critical to your dog's health and soundness. Failure is not an option!








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL MAINTANCE
This article proudly presented by
WWW.PURINA.CO.UK
and
WWW.PETS.THENEST.COM

A good rule of thumb is, if you can hear your dog’s toenails clicking as he walks across the floor, it's time for a trim. Most young to adult dogs rarely if ever need their nails trimmed. Walking on hard surfaces, such as the pavement, will naturally wear down the nails. However, untrimmed nails can break, bleed or even grow into the feet, causing the animal a lot of discomfort. In older dogs walking on overgrown nails can cause pain in arthritic feet. Hearing a "click-click-click" as your pet walks on hard floors is the most obvious sign that nails need a clip. You need to be shown how to correctly clip your dog's claws to avoid causing damage to the nail and pain to your dog, so always consult your vet/vet nurse before attempting to clip your dog's claws at home.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Professional groomers usually include a nail inspection, clipping and filing service as part of all grooming services, and as part of the basic fee without assessing additional cost. Most groomers also offer nail clipping only services. Dogs need their nails clipped and filed on a regular basis, usually every 3 to 4 weeks. It is not uncommon for dog owners to wait too long between nail clipping.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Overdue nails raise health issues. Extended growth can result in painful ingrown nails. Elongated nails affect the comfort and health of dogs. Some dogs will find it difficult to place their full body weight on their feet with discomfort from elongated nails. As a result these dogs develop sore feet, legs and hips and overall discomfort. Just to walk can then be a painful experience for them.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Nail clipping is essentially the process of cutting away excess nail, and the key is to learn just what is the "excess nail." If you can hear dog nails when walk on a hard floor surface, there is probably a small or better amount of excess nail to clip and/or file down.

It is better to cut a small amount regularly than a large amount at once. However, since dogs may go many weeks between professional grooming appointments it is usually the task of groomers to reasonably clip more excess nail. Praise the dog after nail clipping to encourage them to be less resistant to future nail clipping sessions.

If you do not think your dog will tolerate having his nails clipped, will become stressed or upset, or at worst try and nip you then do not try and clip the nails yourself but ask your vet to do it. Most veterinary practices have veterinary nurse's clinics where this can be done cheaply.

If the nails are very overgrown, grown into the pad or your have no one to help you, then you may be better asking your local veterinary practice to clip the nails for you than trying yourself for the first time.

After your tutorial by your vet/vet nurse you are ready to go, but ensure you purchase the correct type of nail clippers from your veterinary practice or groomers. Only use nail trimmers that have been specifically designed for pets and ensure they are sharp and well-maintained.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish
Vet vs. Groomer
The vet's office is one the most popular options when getting your dog's nails clipped. Some vet's include the cost of nail clipping in the annual checkup price, but if you're getting the nails done separately, the average cost will be $10 or less. Groomers usually include the cost of a nail clipping in the cost of a grooming package. A full grooming can cost anywhere from $30 to $90, depending on the size of your dog. This includes clipping the nails, trimming the ear hair, washing and drying the dog, and clipping the hair into a certain style.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish
Benefits of Professional Clipping
Some dogs can be extremely anxious about getting their nails clipped and this can lead to clipping the nail too short. A veterinary or groomer will have more experience and will be less likely to hurt the dog. If the dog knows she can get her way by whining, she may also try this in order to get you to stop working on her nails.




Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish
Importance of Regular Clipping
Allowing a dog's nails to grow too long can result in injuries. Not only may the nails crack, but your dog is more likely to get his toenail caught in the carpet or his bedding and rip the nail off. This can be extremely painful and will require immediate veterinary attention. Once nails are overgrown, the dog may require sedation in order to grind the nails down to the proper length.




Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish
What to Do for Overgrown Nails
Unless a dog has a bleeding issue, she will not bleed to death from cutting the nail into the quick. Your vet will dip the bleeding nail in cornstarch or use a styptic pencil to help clot the blood. If a dog's nails are extremely overgrown, the quick will be much further down the nail, making it almost impossible to cut the dog's nails short enough. This is where professional grinding of the nails comes into play. The dog will need to be put under sedation and the vet will use a grinder to take the nails down to the proper length. Afterward, your dog will not be able to walk on pavement or other abrasive surfaces for a few days.








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
BEFORE YOU CUT THE NAIL..
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DOGS.ABOUT.COM

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


Why Should I Trim My Dog's Nails?
Dog nails are constantly growing, just like human nails. Some dogs wear down their nails naturally from walking on pavement, gravel or concrete. However, the majority of today's dogs live indoors and don't spend enough time on these surfaces to keep the nails short. This is especially the case with small dogs - like Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds, two breeds that seem to especially dislike having their paws touched. If left to grow, some dog's nails will curl under and actually start growing into the foot pads. This leads to painful sores and infections. Even if they do not curl under, long nails can make it difficult for dogs to walk, especially on slick surfaces. Finally, long nails can easily get caught on something and become partially torn off or split. This is very painful for your dog, and treating a torn nail may require sedation at your vet's office.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

How Often Do I Need to Trim?
The answer here depends on your dog. The rate of nail growth versus the amount of natural wear can vary from dog to dog. To determine when it's time for a nail trim, a good rule of thumb is to trim your dog's nails if they touch the floor when he is standing. In general, most dogs will need a nail trim every month or two. The front nails tend to grow faster that the rear nails, so you may only need to trim the rear nails every other time you do the front or just trim a smaller amount off the rear nails each time.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

How Soon Should I Begin Trimming My New Dog or Puppy's Nails?
Right away! You should begin handling your dog's paws from the moment you bring him home. He should get used to the sensation and associate it with a positive experience - treats, toys, attention. Hold your dog's paws and play with his toes several times a day. Keep your demeanor upbeat. Praise him and reward him with treats when he tolerates the handling. Once you get comfortable with nail trims, begin trimming a tiny amount of the nail every week or two. Take care not to cut too short, or your dog will have a negative experience. Frequent, positive nail trims will teach your dog or puppy that there is nothing to fear. This will make nail trims much easier down the road.


Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

How to Stop a Dog's Nail From Bleeding
Plan for this as a matter of course before you start each nail trimming session

If a nail bleeds, apply styptic powder. This will sting, so be ready to comfort your dog for a second "ouch."

No styptic powder or pencil? Home remedies abound: you can use a little corn starch with baking powder. Dipping in flour also works in a pinch, helping staunch bleeding and promoting coagulation.

It should cease bleeding in about 5 minutes, after which you can examine and see if you should bandage, or put a doggy sock on to prevent licking or infection. Clean with a damp cloth.

If bleeding persists, contact your vet.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL TRIM MISTAKES
This article proudly presented by
WWW.SMARTDOGUNIVERSITY.COM

I usually hear a variety of sentiments including:

I have no idea how to trim my dog's nails.
My dog hides when the trimmers come out.
My dog hates to have her paws fooled with.
I don't know what tools I need to trim my nails.
What if I hurt my dog?

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

5 Mistakes
People don't condition their dog to nail handling early, as puppies (or for rescue dogs, when they first get their dog).

People force their dog to have their nails trimmed. I have heard stories about "four people just sit on my dog and we get the job done."

People are stingy. They don't want to reward a dog for allowing nail trims.

People are impatient. They want the job done now, yesterday really, and don't really care how it gets done.

People cut the nail too far and hit their dog's quick.


Condition your dog early to nail and paw handling.
If you are starting with a puppy, pet your dog all over — including his paws. Make it fun, praise your dog, play with him and love him up for allowing you touch his feet. The more you make paw handling part of regular petting, the easier it will be to handle his paws for nail trims. If you're starting with an older dog, you can still incorporate the paws into your petting and playing routine. You may have to go more slowly, as the dog may have had unpleasant experiences involving his paws. In the end, though patience and conditioning will go a long way to your dog's tolerance of nail trims.

Allow your dog a choice when trimming his nails.
If your dog isn't comfortable with a medical or grooming procedure, forcing him to endure the process will lead to him hating it more the next time. The more your dog dislikes something, the harder he will work to avoid the situation. You can see how quickly you can create a horrid and frightful situation that your dog is willing to work to avoid. By allowing your dog the choice to have his nails trimmed, you are allowing your dog to feel comfortable with the process and with you. A dog who trusts you will allow a lot more than one who doesn't. Earn your dog's trust - you can't force it.

Reward your dog handsomely during paw handling.
By pairing spectacular food treats with paw handling, you are helping your dog look forward to the process. Too often, people will give a single piece of dog food and think that they are spoiling their dog. Those people who are generous will make the fastest and easiest progress. It's very easy - simply save some leftovers from dinner: a little bit of chicken, a smidgen of a steak, some pieces of salmon. You want the reward to really get the dog's attention to get the best results. The tastier the treat, the better and faster the positive association will build.

Patience will get you faster results.
If you are going to rush through the process, you might as well not even start. By giving the dog the choice to walk away, you are telling the dog you will go at his pace. Rushing the pace will shut the process down quickly. Rushing will actually make the process take longer than if you'd just taken your time in the beginning. Also, if you're using nail clippers, you are much more likely to nip the quick when you are in a hurry.

Use a grinder, not clippers.
Experienced groomers and veterinary technicians make good use of clippers. But for people who don't trim dog nails for a living, it's safer for us to use a grinder like the Dremel. By grinding the nail, you are much less likely to nick the quick because you're taking a little bit of the nail off at a time.








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
STRESS-FREE DOG NAIL CUT
This article proudly presented by
WWW.LOLATHEPITTY.COM
and
WWW.DOGSNATURALLYMAGAZINE.COM
and
WWW.PETS.WAHL.COM

1. Learn how to properly clip nails.
It's important to learn how to properly trim your dog's nails before diving in. If you clip too short, they will bleed. Which brings me to my second tip: And make sure you have good clippers! Crappy clippers can mean unclean cuts and pain for your dog. We use the Miller's Forge brand and they have been awesome.

2. Always keep Kwik Stop nearby.
This is where Murphy's Law comes into play, if you don't have it next to you when trimming your dog's nails, you will accidently cut too short.

3. Trim often.
The more often you clip, the faster the quick will pull back!

4. Trim near a light or in daylight.
I'm lucky, Lola and Rio have white paws which means I can see their quick. So when I'm trimming their nails, I always make sure to have a bright light behind me or do it in the daytime near a window. This just gives me a little extra insurance and enables me to get as close to the quick as possible without causing the nail to bleed.

5. Bend their front paw back.
This is probably the one tip that helped me make progress with Lola. I eventually got to the point where back paws being trimmed were fine, but front paws? A nightmare. My theory: because she was watching me, she would anticipate the clip and it would freak her out.

6. Bring on the treats!
Treats are essential. Don't even bother if you're not willing to reward. Lola now associates nail trims with fun and deliciousness. One nail = one treat. A tiny treat, but a treat nonetheless.

7. Make nail trimming fun:
always associate nail cutting with cookies and praise.

8. It's actually easier to see the nail structures on pigmented nails than on white ones.
The insensitive nail will show as a chalky ring around the sensitive quick.

9. Keep clipper blades almost parallel to the nail
Never cut across the finger.

10. For maintenance, cut every two weeks.
To shorten, cut every week.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL FILE
This article proudly presented by
WWW.SHIRLEYCHONG.COM
and
WWW.DOGTHUSIAST.COM
and
M. Shirley Chong

The easiest way to do a dog's nails in my opinion is to have the dog do their own nails. It's easy! Find a board about 8-12 inches wide and 24-36 inches long. Take a look at the dog's conformation: the wider the dog, the wider the nail file needs to be. This should be comfortable for the dog to use, not difficult. Go to the hardware store and get some of the stick on tape that is used on wooden steps to make them slip-proof. It's rough, like extremely coarse sandpaper and the adhesive lasts through anything.

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


Cover the board with the slip-proof tape. You could also use sandpaper. The most important thing is to make sure the edges of the sandpaper are firmly glued down because otherwise the dog will peel it up. I don't know what sort of adhesive comes on the slip-proof tape but once it's stuck down on the board, it's not going to budge for anything less than extreme measures. The guy at the hardware store said if you want to remove it, you have to heat it up and use a scraper to peel it up. The stuff is meant to resist foot traffic and lasts forever. If it wore out, I think I'd just scrap the whole thing and make a new one.

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


You now have a giant nail file for dogs!
Teach the dog to paw the board with their front feet. If you can get a paw touch and then deliberately delay the click, you are almost certain to get a raking motion. Once the dog starts pawing on the board, most of them get very enthusiastic about it. A sizable minority alternate feet as if they were digging but it's not difficult to stop the dog that uses only one foot and get them to switch feet. Some dogs prefer the board propped at an angle, other dogs prefer the board flat on the floor. You can put a foot on one end of the board to keep it from slipping around if it is flat on the floor. I know one person who built a little frame to support the board at a forty five degree angle but most people don't do anything that fancy. If your dog prefers the board at an angle, the easiest way is to prop it against your own knees.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

The only caution I have is to put the board away where the dog can't reach it when not in use. Everyone I've told this about who left the board out came home to find that the dog had quicked their own nails and then padded about the house, getting blood everywhere. Oddly enough, dogs do not seem to mind quicking their own nails on the board.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

My theory is that the sensation builds up slowly and so is not surprising or overwhelming the way it is when the nail clippers do it. When operating the board, keep a sharp eye out and stop proceedings when the dog is getting close to quicking the nails. Especially if the dog started out with really long nails the first few times they use the board they are likely to file the nails unevenly and at funny angles. Just keep letting the dog use the board and when the nails are short they will even out.

Dogs seem to enjoy it a whole lot more than they enjoy nail trimming.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

What about the other nails, like the dew claws?
Our ultimate goal is to be able to clip them of course, or use a Dremel, but for now the sandpaper may be the solution. If your dog doesn't take care of his dew claws, you will need to get these trimmed another way. For the rear claws, you may be able to train a similar behavior with the sandpaper.








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL TRIMMING
EQUIPMENT

This article proudly presented by
WWW.DOGS.ABOUT.COM
and
WWW.NAILCLIPPR.COM
and
WWW.REVIEWSPROD.COM

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

Before you begin your dog's nail trim, be sure you have the right equipment. First and foremost, you must choose your nail trimmers. There are a few styles of nail trimmers available. The right choice depends on the size of your dog's nails and your own preference.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

These are the main types of nail trimmers available on the market today:

Guillotine style: This style of nail trimmer has an internal blade and a hole to line up the nail. When the handle is squeezed, the blade comes up to trim the nail, kind of like an upside-down guillotine. Many beginners find this type of trimmer very easy to use. However, it is very important to hold this trimmer in the correct manner so that it works properly.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

The handle should be down below the dog's paw, with the nail hole at the top. The screws on the trimmer should be facing towards your dog. The nail should then be lined up inside the hole at the right spot to make the cut. The internal blade on guillotine trimmers can be replaced when it becomes dull. Guillotine trimmers work best for small to medium size nails. They are not ideal for very large or very small nails.

Scissors style: These trimmers work just like a pair of scissors. Rather than a flat cutting surface, they have a curved blade to cut the round nail. Simply line up the blade with the nail at the appropriate spot and make the cut. These trimmers are only useful for smaller nails, as they are typically not strong enough for the larger nails. These are typically the least expensive type of trimmer. However, blades may dull over time and the hinge may become loose.

Pliers style: These trimmers are often the preferred choice among professionals. Pliers style trimmers work in a similar manner to the scissors style trimmers, but with more force. They are spring-loaded and the mechanism resembles garden pruners. The small/medium size is great for small and medium size nails. The large size typically works well on all nail sizes except the very small ones, they can leave the ends of small nails frayed. These are easy to use and tend to stay sharp for a long time. The blades, however, are not replaceable and can eventually dull ,though it usually takes years.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

Other Nail-Trimming Equipment These items are not pictured above but they may come in handy during a nail trim:

Styptic Powder: If you cut the nail too short, it will bleed. Even when you do your best to avoid this, it can happen from time to time. The bleeding will eventually stop if pressure is applied, but it can be hard to hold your dog's paw still for several minutes. Styptic powder can stop the bleeding very quickly and it fairly easy to apply. A common brand name is "Kwik Stop". Tip: if you don't have styptic powder, try packing bit of corn starch or flour on the bleeding nail tip. It will also be helpful to have cotton balls, tissues or paper towels handy for nail cleanup.

Metal Hand File or Power Rotary Tool: If your dog will tolerate it, you can use one of these tools to smooth the rough edges after the nail is trimmed. Many professionals prefer to skip the nail trim altogether and use a power rotary tool exclusively (like a Dremel or the Peticure). Because of the sound and vibrations associated with the power tools, you must gradually introduce the tool, allowing him get used to it before using it on the nails. This can take days to weeks depending on your dog.

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

What to consider when choosing a dog nail trimmer
Before you start trimming your dog's nails, it is imperative that you are using the right tools. Obviously you should have some sort of nail clippers for dogs, but there are many styles available. Which one should you use? The correct answer depends on how big your dog is, as well as what you are most comfortable with. Below you will find some information on the top types of nail trimmers for your dog that is available on the market today.

Guillotine StyleThis type of nail clipper consists of an internal blade as well as a hole to line up the dog's nail. Once the handle is squeezed, the blade shoots up to clip the nail, similar to an upside-down guillotine. Many beginners prefer to use this type of trimmer due to its ease of use. With that said, it is imperative that one holds this trimmer properly so that it will function correctly. For starters, when trimming, the handle should be below the dog's paw, and the nail hole should face upwards. Furthermore, the screws on the clipper should point in the direction of your dog. Afterwards, you will need to line up your dog's nail inside the hole of the guillotine trimmer at the right spot to make a proper cut. Once the internal blade begins to dull after repeated use, it will need to be replaced. For the best results, use the guillotine trimmers on small to medium sized dog nails; they are not as effective for very small or large nails.

Scissors StyleLike the name implies, the scissors style trimmers work exactly like a regular pair of scissors. In terms of how it looks, a distinction it has is that it sports a curved blade instead of a flat cutting surface - this allows it to cut rounded nails more effectively. Using the scissors style trimmer is simple. All you need to do is line up the blade where you want to cut and have at it. With that said, this specific type of dog nail clipper is only ideal for smaller nails, since they are not sturdy enough to slice through larger nails. Fortunately, the scissors style trimmers are typically the most affordable variation of trimmer. Be wary of the blade dulling over time as well as loose hinges on the trimmer.

Pliers StyleThis variation is usually the style of choice among professionals. Pliers style clippers function similarly to scissors style clippers, but with much more force. They are fully loaded with a spring mechanism that resemble that of a garden pruner. The small-medium sizes are excellent for use on small to medium sized nails. Large sized pliers are effective for nearly all nail sizes with the exception of smaller nails (as they may result in frayed nails). This style of trimmer is extremely easy to use and are highly durable. However, the blades cannot be replaced and will eventually dull, though this can take years to occur.


Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

Check WWW.REVIEWSPROD.COM
For more information & Reviews on Dog Nail Trimmers!









Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL CUT
This article proudly presented by
WWW.PURINA.CO.UK
and
WWW.PETS.THENEST.COM

Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

Old dogs or deformed nails
Older dogs tend to end up with longer nails, making trimming more tricky. Older dogs tend to end up with long quicks, elongated nails and often extremely hard nails. Nails can also grow back a bit deformed if there has been some sort of trauma to the nail bed, such as when the dew claw has been caught in something and torn. Clipping after bathing can help with the hardness issue, as they nails will be softer. Ensuring you just take the tips off the nails or cut them so they sit just above the floor when your dog is standing can help to ensure you don't cut deformed nails too short. Alternatively, if you gradually take the tips off, you can often make the quick recede a little over time, but you will need to be patient. So long as your dog's nails are not touching the ground, getting caught in anything and causing the toes to splay out or bend, there is no need to worry too much about keeping them extremely short. Whenever you trim your dog's nails remember to make the whole experience rewarding by having treats at the ready and always take a little bit at a time if you can't clearly see the quick beneath the nail. And if you have a very patient dog, why not paint those nails!


Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

Cutting dark claws
The problem with dark nails is that you cannot easily see the quick. Cut dark claws in several small cuts to reduce the chance of accidentally cutting into the quick. As you cut, keep checking the end of your dog's nail. As you cut further along, look out for a dark spot in the centre of the newly clipped edge. This dark area is where the live quick starts. Some other handy hints for cutting dark nails:

Try shining a torch or bright light towards you and through the claw.

Try looking on the underside of the nail where the quick is often more visible.

Bathing can make the quick easier to see and also makes nails easier to cut.

Applying baby oil will serve the same purpose.


Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

Cutting Mixed Claws


Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping

Cutting bright claws
1.Depending on the size of your dog have the dog on your lap or sit on the floor next to your dog. Have a friend/family member help by holding his/her head and providing reassurance.

2.Hold your pet,s paws firmly and push on the pads lightly to make the nail stick out. Starting at the very end of the nail, clip at a 45-degree angle with the cutting end of the nail clipper towards the nail. With dark nails, trim very thin cuttings off the end only otherwise the "quick" or soft part of the nail will be damaged causing pain. If you see a black dot in the centre of the nail, you have got to the quick and should stop cutting immediately. Again be guided by your vet/vet nurse at how much nail to remove.

3.Be very careful to avoid the nail quick, which on white nails is the pink section (you cannot see it in black nails). The quick contains nerves and blood vessels and when nicked will bleed easily.

4.Have silver nitrate sticks (available from your vets) and cotton wool balls nearby in case you do accidentally nick the nail quick. If so, and it bleeds, don't panic. Calmly apply the silver nitrate to the end of the claw and press with a cotton wool ball for a moment. If the bleeding doesn't stop then consult your vet immediately.

5.Silver nitrate may sting, so ask your helper to hold your dog if the need arises.

6.If you do cause bleeding have a chat with your vet/vet nurse about avoiding this complication in future.

7.Remember to trim the dew claw nail, which is located on the inside of the leg. If left untrimmed, they curl up and grow into the soft tissue like an ingrown toenail.

8.Trim the nails preferably once a week, but at least twice a month depending on your dog and how often they walk on roads. The more often you trim them the easier it becomes, it's better to take off small amounts more often than to remove large portions every once in a while.

9.Teach nail trimming from an early age. Play "pretend trimming" by touching the feet then rewarding your dog with a favourite treat.

10.Remember to always reward your dog after the nail trimming to make it a positive experience.

11.Use a normal nail file to file the soft toenails of puppies or older dogs with brittle nails, which is unlikely to cause pain or bleeding.

12.When you check the nails, also check the paw pads for any cuts or foreign bodies (grass seeds are a big problem for some dogs in summertime and can lodge between the toes). Check between the toes for any signs of soreness. Contact your vet if you find anything unusual.

13.If you do cut into the quick, hold a piece of tissue onto the nail for a few minutes. It is also a good idea to have some Quick Stop Powder on hand or corn starch, which will stop the bleeding immediately. Or you could do nothing. The bleeding should stop in 5-7 minutes, but if not contact a vet.

14.Giving your dog a bath first softens the nails and makes them easier to clip.

15.Praise your dog a lot afterwards so they don't feel as if they have been scolded.




Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

If you cut the quick
Don't panic. If you accidentally cut the nail too short and it starts to bleed, hold some tissue tightly to the bleeding. Alternatively, use a styptic pencil, styptic powder or styptic pads to stop blood flow. Even without treatment, the bleeding should stop within about 5 minutes. If your dog licks the wound it will slow the healing and clotting process and bleed for a bit longer.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

What does it mean to "dremel" the nail?
Dremelling (a.k.a "nail grinding" or at ADOGO, a Premium Nail Trim) sands down the nails and rounds them out, making this a great option for the summer season when shorts expose legs to excited dogs, nails. The dremel also allows us to clip the nails shorter and closer to the quick without as much risk of nipping the quick.

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


Cutting your dog's claws is not easy so don't feel guilty if you can't do it! If in doubt consult your vet or vet nurse.








Dog Nails Trim, Cut
DOG NAIL TRIM
This article proudly presented by
WWW.PETFROOMER.COM
and
WWW.VETMED.WSU.EDU
and
Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!



Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

The keys to canine nail-trimming success
According to the ASPCA, there are two keys to success: teaching your dog to associate it with something he loves and taking it slowly. To associate nail-trimming with things your pooch loves, make sure he gets something out of it every time. Take him on a walk or car ride when it's over. Give him a new chew-toy or something special he doesn't get often. Make sure he gets his treat immediately after the trimming is complete.

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


Also, take it super slowly. Just do one or two of them at first, then immediately follow it with the treat. A few days later, do a couple more, making sure you remember his reward. Keep going until all the nails are trimmed. After a while and with a little patience, you will probably be able to do them all in one sitting. Don't force your dog to sit for a clipping and never punish him for a lack of cooperation. This will only create negative associations in his mind. If he's not into it, back off.


Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Procedures Before Clipping Nails

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

This information is not meant to be a substitute for veterinary care. Always follow the instructions provided by your veterinarian.

Inspect every dog's ears for potential problems before proceeding with nail clipping procedures. Be prepared to record written descriptions of any suspect conditions so that you may report them accurately to pet owners and veterinarians.

Sterilize any tools that you have used during the nail clipping process, actually a process you should do between all nails clippings as well.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


DOG NAIL CUTTING STEPS
1.Make sure the dog is relaxed and comfortable. If he has never had his nails cut as with young puppies, sit with him a few times per day for a minute or so and tap the clippers you will use to his nails gently. Use a soft questioning tone of voice to relay to him there is no threat. Slightly distract his attention and decrease his anxiety by rubbing his ears. Have the dog sit, and talk to him softly to keep him calm.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

2.Most dogs do not like having their claws trimmed. Start trimming claws in young animals so that they get used to the process. Some dogs will happily sit in your lap or on a table while you trim their claws but many require some form of restraint.

3. One method to restrain the dog is to place her/him on a table. Stand on the side of the table opposite to the claws you are trimming. Drape your arms and upper body over the dog. When trimming the front claws, keep your left forearm over the neck to keep the dog from lifting its head. Hold the paw in your left hand and hold the trimmer in your right hand. If the dog tries to stand, lean your upper body over his/her shoulders to prevent him/her from rising.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


4.If your dog is too wiggly, try laying him/her on his/her side.

5.Use your right arm and upper body to keep the dog laying on his/her side. Hold the trimmer in your right hand. Use your left arm to keep the head on the table and use the left hand to hold the paw.

6.It is easier to perform this procedure if you have a helper. See the section on restraining a dog for some additional suggestions.

7.There are several styles of nail trimmers, including a guillotine type and a scissors type. The guillotine type is the easiest to use in dogs.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


8.The scissors-type is used to trim a toenail that is so long that it is curling in a circle. Long claws can grow into the toe-pad. This most often happens to dew claws, the claw on the inner side of the paw. Dew claws do not touch the ground so they are not worn down as the dog walks.

9.The dew claw is attached to the leg by loose skin. The dew claw can usually be bent away from the leg so that you can fit a guillotine type trimmer over the tip of the dew claw.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


10.The scissors-type cutter is placed at a right angle to the toenail.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


11.Hold the trimmer in your right hand if you are right handed.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


12.Close your hand around the clipper to squeeze the handle which will move the cutting blade.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


13.The guillotine type trimmers have stationary ring through which the nail is placed, and a cutting blade that moves up to slice off the nail when the handles of the trimmer are squeezed.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


14.Unlike cats, dogs do not have retractile claws. The color of the nail is determined by the color of the surrounding skin and hair. This dog has black claws on the brown paw and a mixture of white and black claws on the white paw.

15.Always remember to trim the dew claws that are located on the inner surface of the paw.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


16.The claws on the rear feet are often shorter and require less frequent trimming than those on the front feet. Always remember to trim the dew claws that are located on the inner surface of the paw unless they were removed as a puppy. Some breeds of dogs such as the St. Bernard have 2 sets of dew claws on the rear feet.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


17.Light colored claws are easier to cut than dark claws as the blood vessels and nerves that supply the claw, called the quick, are easier to see.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


18.Cut the claw to within approximately 2 millimeters of the quick.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

19.If you cut into the quick, the claw will bleed and the dog will experience pain.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


20.The handles of the trimmer can be held pointing toward the floor, as pictured at the left (cutting the nail from bottom to top) or the handles of the trimmer can be held pointed towards the ceiling - cutting the nail from top to bottom, which ever is more comfortable in your hands.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

The tip of the nail is placed in the stationary ring in the trimmer with the clipper perpendicular to the nail (cutting either top to bottom or bottom to top). If the trimmer is placed parallel to the nail (cutting from side to side), the nail is crushed and may splinter.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


The cutting blade should be facing you, NOT the dog. The screws on the handle of the trimmer should be facing the dog.

If you turn the trimmer around with the screws toward you, the cutting blade is cutting closer to the quick than if the trimmer is held with the cutting blade toward you. You are less likely to cut into the quick if the cutting blade faces you.


21.The handles of the trimmer are squeezed to advance the cutting blade through the nail.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

22.Light colored claws can be trimmed with one cut on each nail.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


22.You cannot see the quick on dark colored claws, making them more difficult to trim without cutting into the quick.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


23.Cut dark colored claws in several small cuts to reduce the chance of cutting into the quick.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


24.As you cut off small pieces of the nail, look at the cut edge of the nail. The light tissue is the curved bottom part of the nail. The mottled light and dark tissue is the top part of the nail.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, PolishDog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


25.As you cut the nail deeper, you will see a homogeneous gray to pink oval starting to appear at the top of the cut surface of the nail. Stop cutting the nail at this point as additional cutting will cut into the quick. The sharper the trimmer, the cleaner the cut. The cutting blade on guillotine-style cutters can be replaced when it is no longer sharp. You can file the end of the nail to smooth the cut surface.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


26.A correctly cut dark colored nail next to an uncut mixed colored nail. The mixed color nail is darker close to the base of the nail preventing one from seeing the quick. This nail should be trimmed in several small cuts.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


27.If the toenail is cut too short, you can use a styptic pencil containing silver nitrate to stop blood flow, although many animals object to the styptic pencil as much, or more, than toenail cutting. The black end of the stick is held to the bleeding nail and gently rotated until bleeding stops. Even without any treatment the nail should stop bleeding in about 5 minutes or less.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish


Washington State University assumes no liability for injury to you or your pet incurred by following these descriptions or procedures.








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL TRIMMING GUIDES
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DOGICA.COM

DOGS.ABOUT.COM

WWW.ASPCA.ORG

WWW.WIKIHOW.COM

WWW.DRSOPHIAYIN.COM








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
HOW TO TRIM AGRESSIVE DOG
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DOGICA.COM

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


WWW.HARTZ.COM

WWW.HEALTHYPETS.MERCOLA.COM








Dog Nails Cleaning & Care
HOW TO CLEAN DOG NAILS
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DOGTIPPER.COM

Just like our own nails, your dog's nails get dirt beneath them which can transport a lot of mud into the house. We don't usually notice that dirt at first and then it dries and falls out somewhere inside the house!

Some people use a file to clean out that dirt but that can be dangerous if your dog jerks during the cleaning. Instead, we've been using the new Q-tips Precision Tips cotton swabs. Like the original Q-tips, these cotton swabs have 100 percent pure cotton at each end but here's where they differ: these Q-tips have a precision, pointed tip at each end!

Using the Q-Tips Precision Tips,
I cleaned beneath Irie's nails.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

It was quick and easy to get the mud out from beneath Irie's large nails, which grow amazingly fast. There's no cleanup as with other nail grooming tools.








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL DISORDERS
This article proudly presented by
WWW.PETMD.COM
and
WWW.VETINFO.COM

If you own a dog, it is quite likely that at some point in time your dog will tear, crack or break a nail. Dogs are active creatures, and their nails can get caught on any loose material while they run and play. If a nail is caught, it can tear or break off completely. In some cases, the nail may crack rather than break. The dew claws, the nails found higher up on the front of the foot, are most susceptible to tearing and breaking because they are more loosely attached than regular nails, putting them more at risk.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Another common cause of a cracked or broken nail is nail clipping. When a dog's nails are being trimmed, it takes only a small jerk of his paw to cause a nail to break or chip, and if he yanks hard enough, he could tear a nail partially or rip it out completely. Nails that are too long are more likely to snag and be torn, and long nails are also more likely to break or crack when a dog is walking or running on asphalt, concrete or a similar hard surfaces. In addition, some dogs are just born with weaker nails, making them more susceptible to damage.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Nail and nail bed disorders refer to any abnormality or disease that affects the claw or surrounding area, generally known as dystrophy. One type of nail disorders, paronychia, is an infection that causes inflammation around the nail or claw. Fungal infections, such as onychomycosis, can also occur in or around the nail bed.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dogs may suffer from extremely brittle nails (onychorrhexis), or have nails that slough, peel, or chip away excessively (oychomadesis). Most nail or nail bed disorders have an excellent treatment prognosis and can usually be treated and remedied in a relatively short amount of time.

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Symptoms of a Damaged Nail

The following signs are all possible indications that your dog has injured a nail:

Favoring a paw by holding it in the air rather than walking on it

Limping or visibly not putting weight on a particular paw while walking

Blood on the floor of your dog's bedding

Constant licking of a particular paw

A visibly swollen paw or toe

Resistance when you attempt to examine a paw or toe

Licking at the paws

Lameness, difficulty walking

Pain in the feet

Swelling or redness of the tissues surrounding the nails

Nail plate deformity (the part of the nail that overlays the nail bed)

Abnormal nail color


Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Treat The Injured Dog Nail
The dog nail is very sensitive due to all the nerves that are present in the nail bed, so an injury will be very painful. Dogs can injure their nails while playing or running. You might accidentally injure the nail while trimming it too short. Knowing how to treat a nail injury and relieve the pain of your pet is essential for a dog owner.

The dog nail is made up of a keratin shell that covers some sensitive nerves, known as the quick. The nail is fixed and grows continually, so it should be regularly clipped. Otherwise, the nail can break off or curve into the paw, causing wounds in the flesh and infections. A nail that's too long can also cause back pain for the dog and can make him more prone to injury. Knowing how a nail is structured is important to be able to prevent nail injuries, and to offer proper treatment, should an injury occur. A nail injury can occur during regular activities. A dog can get hurt by sharp objects, for example. If the nail is sharp it can get caught in materials such as carpets or bedding. When clipping your dog's nails, you should pay close attention so as not to injure him. A nail injury can be painful, and can cause severe foot pain and limping. If not treated, a nail injury can lead to infection and severe pain; the infection can spread to the foot and enter the bloodstream.


Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

The treatment of a nail injury should focus on preventing an infection and speed up the healing of the nail. The treatment depends on the type of injury.

If the injury occurs due to a trim that's too short, you should stop the bleeding by using some styptic powder. Make sure the nail is kept clean. You can cover it with bandages to prevent the dog from licking the wound. The nail should be washed with an antibacterial soap twice per day. Apply some antibiotic ointment and remove bandages during nighttime. The healing time may range from a few days to a week, depending on the severity of the injury.

If the nail is cracked, the dog should be given a sedative, because the nail should be trimmed. If the crack is vertical, you should visit the vet, because the crack may extend as the nail grows.

If the nail is torn or broken, it should be trimmed until the point of the injury. Avoid cutting into the quick.

The injury should be cleaned to remove harmful bacteria that can cause infections. Use a mild antibacterial soap. The infection should be prevented with oral antibiotics and topical ointments that contain antibiotics. Cover the nail with a bandage.

If the quick is affected, the injury will be painful, due to the numerous nerve endings that are located in the nail bed. A painful nail injury may require pain medication as well.








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL DISORDER CARE
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DOGICA.COM

If you are comfortable doing so, examine your dog's paw if he exhibits any of the above symptoms. If his toe is sore and injured, he may not allow you to examine or touch his foot. If he resists your efforts, pack him up and take him to a vet. If your dog allows you to examine his paw, you might still consider a muzzle or at least a helper who can divert your dog's attention, and his mouth, away from your hands as you examine him.

Causes

Infection

Bacteria or fungus

Tumor or cancer

Trauma

Immune system (immune-mediated) diseases

Excessive levels of growth hormone

Disorders present at birth (congenital)

Cutting the nails too close to the nail bed

Neoplasia


Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

First, you need to remove the remaining piece of nail to prevent further injury and to allow for proper healing and regrowth of the nail. Use pet nail clippers to cut off the remaining nail just above the point where it’s broken or torn. This will make a clean cut in the nail that will increase the chances of the nail growing back properly.


Stop the Bleeding
Removing the nail may cause your dog's toe to bleed, especially if the breakage occurred at the quick of the nail. Make sure you have the pet emergency kit out: a styptic pencil or powder applied to the wound will stop the bleeding almost immediately, as it contains a cauterizing agent that seals the wound. If you don't have a styptic pencil or powder, you can apply some regular flour or cornstarch to the wound and compress with a towel for a few minutes until the bleeding stops.

In the event that there is a trauma to your dog's nail bed, check to see if only a single nail is being affected. If multiple nails are affected, a serious underlying medical condition is the more likely cause for the disorder. A skin scraping may also be taken to determine what type of a skin condition your dog has, as well as a bacterial or fungal culture for further analysis.


Clean the Wound
Once the nail is removed, you will need to clean and disinfect the toe to prevent infection. Bathe your dog's paw in warm water, and be sure that all traces of dirt and debris are gone. Spray a pet antiseptic on your dog's toe - it will disinfect the area, and will also relieve any discomfort from the open wound your dog may experience. If the wound bleeds again, apply pressure or use a styptic pencil or powder.


Bandage the Paw
Dogs don't like having their paws bandaged, so this can be a tricky procedure. You can try wrapping the paw in a loose-fitting bandage, using first aid tape to hold in place. Another method is to place a clean sock on the paw and tape it into place. A sock often works better than a regular bandage because it's less restrictive for the movement of the paw, which makes it more likely that your dog will not pull it off. If your dog pulls the bandage or sock off, you may want to place a plastic cone collar (E collar) around his neck for a few days until the wound heals.

If you see signs of infection, take your dog to the vet immediately. The vet will most likely prescribe antibiotics to clear up the infection. If the wound is healing as it should, place a new bandage or sock on the paw. If your dog is wearing an E collar, after two or three days, the wound should be healed to a degree that your dog will not lick it and the E collar can be removed.


Treatment
Treatment will be dependent upon the particular underlying medical condition that is causing the nail or nail bed condition. If the nail area is inflamed, surgical removal of the nail plate (the hard part of the nail) may be necessary to encourage drainage of the underlying tissue. Antibiotic and antimicrobial soaks are also effective for preventing or reducing inflammation, and for encouraging the healing process. If the condition is related to a bacterial or a fungal infection, topical treatments and/or ointments are often administered to the affected area.

In most cases, application of the topical treatment or ointment will clear up any nail issue. While there are typically not many complications that can arise from these disorders, it is important to observe your dog's progress as it recovers, referring to your veterinarian if the healing does not appear to be progressing as it should.


Treating a Broken Dew Claw on a Dog
Broken dew claw treatment varies slightly, as your vet may recommend removal of both of the dew claws completely if injury occurs to one. This is a common procedure performed on several different breeds of dogs; after healing, your dog will be able to run and walk just as before.


Prevention
When clipping your dog's toenails it is important to avoid cutting too close to the nail bed - also called the quick. The vein in the nail bed may inadvertently be cut, which can cause excessive bleeding and lead to an infection, and nicks to the skin can open your dog to infection as it goes about its normal routine of going outside for walks. It is essential that you look closely at your dog's nails before cutting so that you know exactly where the free edge of the nail ends and the nail plate begins. Only the free edge of the nail should be cut.

The best way to protect your dog from a painful nail disorder is to research the proper methods for cutting the nails, pay close attention while cutting, and promptly cleanse and protect the area when an inadvertent injury does occur.








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
BEST DOG NAIL CLIPPERS 2015
This article proudly presented by
WWW.NAILCLIPPR.COM

When a dog is uncooperative, it is difficult for any pet owner to trim their nails. Many people fear trimming their dog’s nails too short or nipping the quick, which can cause bleeding and leave behind tiny droplets of blood in the home. By using the proper dog nail trimmer, one can greatly reduce the chances of a mishap occurring and can focus on safely cutting their dog's nails. Since dogs come in many shapes and sizes, there is no perfect nail clipper that is suitable for them all.

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


It is imperative that one purchases and uses the appropriate trimmer that will best fit over their dog's nail for the perfect cut. Doing research and gaining knowledge on the various dog nail clippers available on the market will definitely make this process easier, and this guide aims to help you do that. Below is our best dog nail clippers of 2015 review.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

10. Safari W6107

This trimmer comes with a plastic molded handle for a superior grip, as well as a stainless steel blade for a clean cut. The trimming edge of the Safari W6107 has an integrated double blade as well as a safety stop to protect against injury. This dog nail trimmer is best suited for use on medium to large dogs.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

9. FURminator 104014

This is a professional nail clipper suitable for most dogs. The FURminnator 104014 features an antimicrobial handle that is further reinforced with a plastic covering. This clipper is a single shaft trimmer, meaning it can be used with only one hand. Furthermore, the stainless steel blade helps users with easy trimming and safe cuts.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

8. Bamboo 810051

This clipper is small and features a guillotine style blade. The Bamboo 810051 comes with a storage compartment for styptic powder as well as a filing blade located in the handle. The blade itself is made of stainless steel and can be removed and replaced if dull.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

7. Resco PF0732

The Resco PF0732 comes with a sharp trimming edge and a medium sized opening perfect for trimming the nails of small to medium sized dogs. The ergonomic handles are also easily gripped and has a powder coating that allows one to further increase their grip; no more worrying about accidentally dropping the trimmer. If the blades on this clipper become dull, they can be removed and replaced.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

6. Andis 65700

This heavy-duty nail clipper can be used for dogs of nearly all sizes. The Andis 65700 includes an ergonomic handle, anti-slip coating for extra grip, stainless steel blades, and a safety lock. In an effort to avoid over-cutting, the Andis 65700 has a safety stop mechanism built in.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

5. Millers 767C Forge Dog Nail Clip

For dogs with medium to large nails, the Millers 767C Forge clipper is a fantastic high-quality tool for the job. This trimmer comes with a non-slip, grippable handles as well as a spring loaded action and sharp cutting edge for easier trimming. The Millers 767C can also be used for dewclaw removal and tail docking.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

4. Conair PGRDNCS

Ideal for small to medium sized dogs, this nail clippers comes with a spring loaded action as well as a stainless steel blade. The handle is designed to fit the grooves of your hands. The Conair PGRDNCS also has a non-slip grip coating as well as rugged indentations for extra grip and prevention of hand strain.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

3. Resco PF0785

The Resco PF0785 is a dog nail clipper that is nearly identical to that of a pair of scissors. The blades are attached to molded rubber handles with a soft rubber grip. It also has a double lock pivot screw and a sharp stainless steel blade. The Resco PF0785 is good for large dogs.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

2. Resco PF0748

The Resco PF0748 is a regular style dog clipper with a chrome plate coating. The blade of this trimmer has a large enough opening for trimming the nails of any sized dog. When squeezed, the handle pushes the stainless steel guillotine blade over the nail, leaving behind a clean cut. Furthermore, the blades on this trimmer can be replaced when dull.


Best Dog Nail Trimmers

1. JW Pet 65105

Lastly, the JW Pet 65105 is a dog nail clipper that is designed with safety in mind. This trimmer comes with a nail guard that protects the user (and dog) from cutting the nail too short and damaging the quick. That means no bleeding and no frightened dog, and more peace of mind. Additionally, the JW Pet 65105 also comes with a soft grip handle and stainless steel blades.








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
SCARRED DOG DESENSITIZING
This article proudly presented by
WWW.ANGIESLIST.COM

Has your dog ever had a nail trimmed too short during a dog grooming session? It's not uncommon; accidents happen. Often it's done because the dog pulls away just at the wrong time, other times unskilled individuals don't pay attention to the anatomy of the dog's foot and nail bed. If your dog gets scared the minute you pull out the nail trimmers, start desensitizing him with these steps:

1. Have two things ready:
A supply of really special treats that your dog loves, but rarely gets

2. A different type nail trimmer (one the dog hasn't learned to be scared of)

3. Hold a small treat in your hand and touch the top of his leg softly. If he doesn't pull away, give him a treat. If he's so scared that you can't even attempt to go near his leg or foot, touch his neck and give a treat.

4.After repeating this a few times with positive reaction, move closer to his foot.

5.Once you're able to touch his foot, use the different pair of nail trimmers and just touch his foot with them, don't cut yet.

6. Finally, trim one nail, and give a "jackpot" treat - a handful of the special delicacies.








Dog Nails, Claws, Trimming and Clipping
DOG NAIL ART
This article proudly presented by
WWW.DAILYMAIL.CO.UK
and
WWW.PIXIMUS.NET
and
WWW.PETHEAD.COM
and
WWW.WORLDFORPETS.COM.AU
and
WWW.ACIDCOW.COM
and
WWW.DOGFASHIONONLINE.COM

WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!
WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!



Want to Buy Dog Nail Polish?

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

WWW.PETHEAD.COM


or

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

WWW.WORLDFORPETS.COM.AU



Nail dog polish is used to paint nails of a dog. It is specifically designed to be safe for a dog. Human nail polish should not be used on dogs because it contains harmful ingredients that can harm it. Dog nail polish is easy to use and requires only one application. It is also fast drying to reduce smudges. Dog nail polishes come in a variety of colors such as pink, purple, and red. They come in solid and glitter colors.


Dog Nail Fashion, Art

And now there's a new fashion for the stylish canine!

WWW.DOGFASHIONONLINE.COM


Doggie Nail Art: A Fun New Way to Make Sure Your Dog Hates You! I'm pretty sure I got in trouble a time or two for painting my dog's nails as a child. Apparently Fido doesn't particularly like being groomed in that way, and can get squirmy and knock over polish bottles. Now, however, it seems that doggy nail art is a legitimate hobby. So are these looks creepy or neat? Take a look, and let us know what you think!

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish

Dog Nail Trimmer, Clipper, Polish




DOG PAWS - DOGICA®
YOU MIGHT BE INTERESTED IN
DOGICA® DOG PAWS PAGE !





WANT MORE? VISIT DOGICA® HOMEPAGE
Copyright by Barrymore, Kai Levy and ZERenish © 2014 / ® All rights reserved worldwide.
® All rights reserved worldwide ©
All materials on DOGICA® pages belong to their respective rights owners
If you wish to Add\Remove\Update your material - contact DOGICA®
Find the author of any image with TINEYE tool Find the author of any image with TINEYE tool
All material was found & collected on All material collected on GOOGLE

THANK YOU, FOR VISITING DOGICA® !



DOGICA® COMMENTS BOARD
DOGICA® MENUS ON-OFF / DOGICA® MOBILE MODE

WWW.UCOZ.COM - Create a free website!
TAKE ME TO THE SKY!