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Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations
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How to find Local Dog Laws?
Local governments are still in charge of most kinds of basic animal regulations, including limits on the number of dogs per household, license and vaccination requirements, and leash laws. Laws covering these issues tend to be broadly similar everywhere, but their details vary significantly from town to town. To find out what the law is where you live, you must do some research. That may be as simple as calling the local Animal Control or Health Department and asking your question. If you want to read the law yourself, always a good idea - you can probably find it in the city or county ordinances, which are often called the "municipal code."

Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations

The code should be available at your local public library, the law library in the county courthouse, and at city hall, usually in the city clerk's or city attorney's office. In most towns, even large ones, local ordinances are kept in a big loose-leaf binder. You can probably find what you need simply by looking in the index under "Dogs" or "Animals." You can often find local ordinances online as well. Draft laws that affect animals draw more response to state legislatures than laws that affect people. Campaigns against Greyhound racing, puppy mills, and dove hunting and demands for control of exotic animals, cat licensing, and felony charges in animal abuse cases generate a hullabaloo that echoes in state and federal legislative chambers, leaving legislators to sort out the facts from the feelings, which are often a gargantuan task.

Animal laws are not always a result of state and federal battles. Squabbles between neighbors often erupt over animals, squabbles that often floweth over into complaints to local governments, and local governments grease the squeaky wheels with some ordinance or other tacked on to the zoning code or the criminal code. These ordinances are often passed out of frustration, with little consideration for the consequences.

Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations

Horrible cases of dog attacks bring a flurry of laws to restrict or ban certain breeds or mixes in a frantic attempt to protect the public from dogs perceived as aggressive because of their appearance or because a similar dog committed a hostile action against a person or pet. In Ohio, the only state with breed-specific restrictions in its legal code, any dog that looks like a "pit bull" is considered vicious regardless of its behavior.

Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations

There is no description of "pit bull" in the law, but the attorney general once said that it was any dog of the bull terrier type. Dog wardens have the authority to identify dogs as pit bulls; if a dog warden says it's a pit bull, it's a pit bull unless the owner has strong evidence to the contrary. Not content with the state vicious dog law, some Ohio dog wardens and city and village council members urge their communities to ban any and all dogs that look remotely like pit bulls. Thus any short-coated, broad headed, muscular dog is in danger in Ohio, especially if it has cropped ears and brindle fur.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

National laws affecting dogs and dog breeders
Under the federal Animal Welfare Act, the US Department of Agriculture regulates commercial breeders, kennels, and brokers who sell dogs through wholesale channels and sets standards for the use of animals in biomedical and product research, circuses, zoos, and other public animal displays. Amendments to the AWA crop up in many sessions of Congress. In 2002, a proposal to allow federal oversight of breeding and socialization practices in regulated kennels was tacked onto the agriculture bill in the Senate but not the House of Representatives, but it was dropped from the final version of the bill.

Currently, the AWA applies only to commercial kennels that sell puppies to pet stores, but a lawsuit by the Doris Day Animal League could result in the addition of all breeders who have more than three intact female dogs to the law. DDAL won a court decision in its favor, but the US Department of Agriculture has filed an appeal. The AWA standards are written for commercial kennel buildings, but if the decision is not overturned, these standards will be applied to homes where puppies are raised as show dogs, working dogs, and performance dogs and for sale directly to the public as pets. Another national bill approved in recent years to protect research laboratories from trespassing and vandalism of animal rights groups extended the same protection to all animal exhibits, including circuses and dog shows. Interfering with a dog show is now a federal offense. Some states have also passed laws to protect animal events, facilities, and venues from the increase in violence and theft committed by these groups.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

State Laws
Some states have kennel licensing laws that parallel or exceed the standards set in the federal law, and some states have puppy lemon laws designed to give buyers some recourse if the puppy they acquire is sick. Some states also place restrictions on breeding, require that animal shelters sterilize all dogs they sell, and prohibit dogs riding in pick-up truck beds. The Connecticut Legislature recently passed a bill to severely restrict the outside housing and tethering of dogs. The governor vetoed the bill on the grounds that it duplicated current anti-cruelty laws and represented "excessive intrusion into people's lives." Provisions in the bill limited the amount of time a dog could be tethered outside or kept in an outdoor or indoor pen.

Ohio has no laws setting standards for commercial kennels, and the state's cruelty law is notoriously weak because it lacks minimum standards for animal care, training for the humane agents who enforce the law, and a requirement for a court order to enter property and seize animals. Dogs must be provided with food, water, and shelter, but they can be kept in filthy, rundown kennels; enclosed in buildings without adequate ventilation; and confined without adequate exercise.

Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Several attempts to increase protection for animals in Ohio have failed in recent legislative sessions because they raised penalties for animal cruelty to a level equal to or above penalties for domestic violence against humans, shifted the burden of proof from the government to the accused animal owner, failed to provide for humane agent training, and did not exempt traditional and humane animal husbandry practices from the definition of cruelty. The Ohio Legislature is looking at two bills (HB 480 and SB 221) that resolve some of these problems but not others.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Basic requirements

1. License your dog
Dog owners are required to license their dogs with the city or, in unincorporated areas, the county.

2. Vaccinate for rabies
This is a requirement in most states, and you may need to supply proof of vaccination to license your dog.

3. Obey leash laws
Using a leash is safer for you and your dog anyway, unleashed dogs can get lost, hit by a car, or bite a person or other animal.

4. Scoop your dog's poop
Many cities require owners to scoop their dog's poop immediately. As anyone who's stepped in dog poop knows, it's the right thing to do anyway.

4. Registration:
You have to register your dog with your local council and keep them up-to-date with your address details.

5. Control:
You have to control your dog at all times. If you're in a public place you must have a leash with you whenever your dog is with you.

6. Proper care and attention:
You have to give your dog proper care and attention, including food, water and shelter.

7. Exercise:
You have to make sure your dog gets adequate exercise.

8. No nuisance:
You have to take all reasonable steps to ensure that your dog doesn't create a nuisance to others, by barking, howling or any other means.

9. No harm:
You have to make sure your dog doesn't harm or distress any person, stock, domestic animal or protected wildlife.

10. No damage:
You have to take all reasonable steps to ensure your dog doesn't damage or endanger any property.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Landlords and pets
As much as you may be tempted, it's a bad idea to sign a lease that forbids you to have a dog,even if the landlord or manager verbally assures you that it's okay or sneak a dog in. You may wind up facing eviction, scrambling to find new housing that allows pets, or most heartbreaking of all taking your dog to the shelter in desperation. Moving is the number one reason people abandon their pets, and about half of those animals are euthanized. Read our advice on points to consider before signing a lease.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dog Bites
You are legally responsible for keeping your dog from hurting people or damaging property. If you don't, you may have to pay a fine or even do jail time not to mention shell out for someone's medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, or lost livestock. The country's leading dog bite lawyer shares his tips on what to do if your dog bites or is bitten by another dog.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dog Barking
Most cities have ordinances against dogs going on barkathons, or at least general noise ordinances that include barky dogs. If your dog barks long and loud and someone complains repeatedly, you may wind up having to pay a fine or even get rid of your dog. You could also be sued for money by an angry neighbor in small claims court. Find out how to handle a neighbor's incessantly barking dog.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dangerous dog laws
Some cities and states have 'dangerous dog' laws that require owners to take extra steps to protect the public from their dog. So what's a dangerous dog? In some areas, a judge or public health official must declare a dog dangerous after a public hearing. In other areas dogs of certain breeds, such as Pit Bulls and Rottweillers, are automatically considered dangerous, even if they've never shown a single sign of aggression. At the very least, the owner of a 'dangerous dog' will be required to keep the dog confined carefully and perhaps muzzle him in public; at most, the dog can be seized and euthanized.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Remove Canine Waste
Each person who owns or controls a dog must remove any feces left by that dog on any sidewalk, gutter, street, or other public area and dispose of it in a legal manner. The person may remove the feces and carry them away with him/her for disposal in a toilet or their own litter basket. The feces may also be placed in a non-leaking sealed bag or container and deposited in a DSNY litter basket. The provisions of this law do not apply to a guide dog accompanying any blind person.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dog Attack
Dog attack defence of a person or property, The keeper (owner or carer) of a dog is liable for any injury, damage or loss caused by the dog. A person may lawfully injure or destroy a dog if that action is reasonable and necessary for the protection of life.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Stray Dogs
Dogs found wandering at large, (wandering the neighbourhood not under the control of the owner or carer), can be taken to the local pound by council officers. Fines will be incurred for allowing your dog to wander at large. The government cannot accept stray dogs, wandering at large, from the public. If you find a stray dog you must contact your local council for them to pick it up and take it to the government or local council pound. It is important to make sure your dog is secure at all times. If it gets out and is not wearing identification, it may end up at the pound. If you do not find it in time, your dog could end up in another home or possibly euthanised if the animal is found to have health and/or behavioural problems or aggresive towards humans or other animals. A large amount of dogs escape during thunderstorms or fireworks, it is important to ensure they are extra secure at these times. See 'Fireworks and Thunderstorms'


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dogs in Cars
Majority of states have a law about dogs in cars. By the law - no person shall leave or confine an animal in any unattended motor vehicle under conditions that endanger the health or well-being of an animal due to heat, cold, lack of adequate ventilation, or lack of food or water, or other circumstances that could reasonably be expected to cause suffering, disability, or death to the animal. A first conviction for violation of this section is punishable by a fine not exceeding $100 per animal. If the animal suffers great bodily injury, a violation of this section is punishable by a fine not exceeding $500, imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding six months, or by both a fine and imprisonment.'


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dog Collars & Tags
It is unlawful for any person to own, harbor, or keep any dog over the age of four months, or to permit such a dog which is owned, harbored, or controlled by him to run at large, unless the dog has attached to its neck or leg a substantial collar on which one of the following is fastened: 1) A metallic tag which gives the name and post office address of the owner. 2) A metal license tag which is issued by the authority of a county, city and county, or any municipal corporation for the purpose of identifying the dog and designating the owner.


Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Inhumane Dog Treatment
Inhumane treatment and abandonment- no person shall treat an animal in a cruel or inhumane manner or torture or cause pain.


Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations

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DOG LICENSE LAW
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Why should I get my dog licensed?
Around the clock notification at your home phone number or emergency number if you lose your licensed pet and someone finds it, eliminating searches, newspaper ads, etc.

A license tells everyone that your pet is yours and not a homeless stray.

Licensing helps pay for the care of homeless animals while attempts are made to find them adoptable homes.

It provides emergency medical care while in the care of Clackamas County, should your pet be found injured.

It helps the County to protect neighborhoods from dangerous dogs and helps to investigate dog bites.

It funds investigations of animal cruelty, abuse, abandonment and neglect.

It supports efforts to find good homes for homeless stray dogs through our active adoption and foster programs.

SOS, Support Shelters - licenses and donations support our efforts to care for lost or abused animals.

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POOP DOG LAW
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STRAY DOGS in EUROPE
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DOG vs HUMAN RIGHTS
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An incident of burning dogs in the city of Nanjing drew nearly 17000 comments from web users on Thursday and triggered a huge debate about dog rights. The behavior under fire took place on Wednesday, when a couple of people poured gasoline on two puppies and their mother and set their cave on fire. The dogs were homeless and had stayed for a few months in a corner of a garden in these people's housing compound. One of them said the dogs' bark disturbed people's sleep, local newspaper reported.

A witness tried to stop the fire, but one puppy was killed. Residents later called police. Messages on online forums said the surviving dogs were taken care of. Condemnation of the burning dominated online comments on this incident. People called the act cruel, utterly inhuman or barbarous. Some say those who set the fire could have gone to jail if they were in some other countries. "You could not like dogs, you could even hate them, but you have no right to take their lives because of your discomfort," one comment read.>

Not long after the debate broke out, a post appeared on tianya club forum written in the name of an old lady, who claimed that the dogs' barking had forced her to increase the dose of her sleeping drugs but still kept her awake at night. The poster admitted that it was her neighbors who tried to burn the dogs to help her and that she was sorry about their behavior. "It is a good thing that people have more awareness of animal protection and animals now have higher status," the poster wrote. "However, please consider here: animals have their rights, but shouldn't people also have their rights as human? When human rights were hurt by animals, whose rights deserve protection more?"

There are also a handful of comments that do not take the burning as such a big deal and insist that China needs to focus on problems of people instead of dogs and cats. "Those who think about dog rights, have you thought about human rights?" One commentator asked, and listed a series of threats homeless animals could bring to human, including carrying disease, barking at children and dropping excrement everywhere. A harsh debate for animal rights like this was unimaginable in China just a couple of decades ago, when most Chinese people were largely concerned of their own livelihood. Material shortage and relatively poor living conditions left people with little heart to care about how animals around them were doing. Recent years have seen more and more Chinese people, mostly affluent urban residents, keep pets like dogs and cats. Animal hospital and shelter have been set up in many places, although such resources are still far from abundant. Schools also carried out the so-called "love education," instructing children to love small animals and respect lives.








Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations
TOP 10 DOG-FRIENDLY COUNTRIES
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1. France
France is the friendliest in our list of dog friendly countries in the world. Owners can bring their pets into supermarkets (outside the food area), shopping centers, and they are welcomed in almost all restaurants. It is common for dogs to be served a bowl of cool water before even getting the menu, especially in summer, and often times they are offered a treat. In many towns and villages in France there are dog "loo" points where bags are provided free of charge to pick up after your pets, and there are bins for disposal, so there really is no excuse not to clean up. There are no leash or muzzle laws unless you have an "attack" or "guard" dog like a Pit bull or Mastiff. Overall France has 61 million domestic animals and nearly half of all households have a pet member. With the most dog ownership in Europe, there are countless dog services, pampering and boutiques in France.

2. Netherlands
In Amsterdam the leash laws are lenient allowing dogs in most restaurants, cafes, and shops. Many hotels and establishments are dog friendly and dogs are off leash in most parks (there are hardly any with only dog-specific fenced areas) and often on the street as well. In order to take your dog on public transit you have to pay for a dog ticket which costs just a few Euros to go anywhere in the country. Crating is legal but used only when necessary (travel, training etc.) In the Netherlands, many people cannot own dogs if they have any convictions (e.g. for drugs or shoplifting) on their record.

3. Sweden
In Sweden dogs are allowed off leash in many areas but you will find dogs are not allowed inside most restaurants and shops. In buses and on trains there most often is a part declared for pets. There are no country-wide breed specific bans, however there was a time in the 90’s when Pitt bulls were illegal but the ban was revoked since authority figures determined it was an owner problem and not a breed problem. Sweden officials estimate less than 1% of dogs are Pit or Pit mixes. 10% of dog bites reported to police are Pit or Pit mixes. Often dog owners will pay off victims to keep bites from being reported because they know they will lose their dog. Keeping a dog in a crate is generally unacceptable unless it is for training or traveling and even then there must be breaks every 2 hours. In doggie daycare it is required that all animals must be able to see out a "sunny window". Dogs aren't allowed to be left alone for more than six hours per day, although this is more a guideline than an absolute rule. It is required by law that dogs must be taken for walks outside the house. Spaying and neutering is normal, unlike in neighboring Norway where it is illegal unless they are overly aggressive.

4. Hungary
In Hungary dogs are allowed in cafes, restaurants and other public places. Many dogs walk off leash with owners, even along crowded Budapest streets. It is common to see people walking their dogs for hours at a time in the parks or in the city on errands. Registration and microchips are mandatory and spay/neutering is commonplace but not compulsory. There is a long list of legal requirements for exercise and medical checkups for all pets. Docking ears or tails is not allowed. Like many of the other dog friendly countries, in Hungary it is considered bad to leave a dog for many hours in the day.

5. Germany
In Germany certain breeds (e.g. Akbash, Staffies, Dogos) must be muzzled in public, unless they have been evaluated for safety. All other breeds are allowed without a muzzle on public transit and most of the time on the train. It is very common to see dogs in restaurants and pubs. Dogs are allowed of leash in many areas. "On leash" areas are marked in public parks. Off leash is everywhere else. Shelters don't put dogs to sleep. Most shelters have acceptable living conditions for the dogs staying there (two dogs in one kennel if possible, daily walks, heated indoor area, behavioral training, working with volunteers) and try their best to make adoptions happen. Citizens in Germany pay a dog tax in order to avoid having to put dogs down and they usually accept strays from nearby countries like France. Most people consider it a bad idea to have a dog if you are working all day long. Leaving a dog alone for 8 hours a day is generally not accepted. Neither is crating. Dogs stay loose in the house when left alone.

6. USA
The US has the world's biggest dog population with one dog for every four Americans. They are considered a leader in dog services offering various therapies (e.g. autism and psychiatric treatment) doggie spas and restaurants. In many States in the US there are restrictions and leash laws with the intention to protect people in public places. Maryland just recently passed a law to allow dogs on restaurant patios with the restaurant owner's approval. In California dogs must be on a leash in most public spaces and allowed off leash only in some remote areas. In Massachusetts dogs are allowed on public transit except during rush hour. In many cities across the country stores (typically non-food) are lax and will allow dogs inside. In Boise there are lots several dog parks where dogs can go off leash. Many counties have specific breed bans but on the bright side training and dog psychology is very much built into American culture. Crating is legal and (usually) embraced.

7. Canada
Canada is considered part of the dog friendly countries due to the abundance of services being offered such as dog hotels, doggie bakeries, boutique shops and specialty grooming. In most cities dogs are not allowed in stores, in many parks, or on public transit unless they are in a crate or carrier. Muzzles are not required but dogs should be on a leash while walking in the street or park. Some restaurants will allow a dog on the patio during the summer months. It is common to spot doggie bowls by doorways or doggie biscuits being offered at most convenience store counters or cafes. In Vancouver, BC there are a few wooded parks where dogs are allowed off leash but if you want to play Frisbee with your dog on a playing field, you are out of luck. However, there are many fenced off dog play areas available in the city. There are breed specific bans across the country but every municipality or province is different. For example, Ontario is the only province in Canada to ban Pit bulls, and they are also banned in Winnipeg, but not any other parts of Manitoba.

8. Australia
In Australia there are many dog beaches and parks where dogs are allowed off leash but also lots of restrictions where dogs are not allowed. For example they are not allowed in national parks in order to protect wildlife. In some states dogs are allowed off leash in parks unless otherwise posted and they must be on a leash on all pedestrian paths. Most states have a restriction on how close dogs can be to playground equipment. There are some breed specific bans in the country, for example in the state of Victoria recent legislation has banned Pit bulls after a Pit bull mix killed a young child. For the most part restaurants and cafes will allow dogs to sit outside, but animals are not allowed inside restaurants, shopping centers or other public spaces. They can be taken on public transit if they are muzzled and/or in a crate or carrier. According to the law dogs must have access to water at all times and crating your dog is perfectly legal.

9. Switzerland
Switzerland currently has a ban on Rottweiler's, Doberman Pinschers, Pit bulls, Mastiff, Cane Corsos and many more. In some towns there are bans that don't specify breeds but instead have a list of certain banned attributes. Unfortunately some people understand this to mean that there is a grey area that could possibly get any dog banned. In most Swiss cities there are laws or guidelines on how to live with your dog (and all other pets) and it is common to have a pet lawyer. A potential dog owner must also pass written and practical testing in order to own a dog, kind of like a driver’s license. Boutiques and doggie daycares are gaining more popularity.

10. United Kingdom
The UK is considered a dog friendly nation however there are some breed bans which are based purely on physical appearance. For example any dog that is reported to look like a Pit bull has to be evaluated and sadly has the potential to be euthanized (this is the same in neighboring Ireland). On the positive side, in London's parks dogs are allowed off leash and in the city the leash laws are lax and dogs are generally allowed in pubs and on public transit. There has been a boom in dog specialty shops in recent years offering more choices for grooming, accessories and other products. In Wales, dogs are allowed on some designated beaches all year round, and most others between the beginning of October and the end of April. Although they are not allowed in restaurants, dogs can be taken on public transit and in most pubs.








Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations
15 WEIRDEST DOG LAWS
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As pup parents, it's always important to stay informed. Your pup looks to you for guidance and knowledge, so the more you know, the better for your pooch. And while there are those basic, mundane, "Did you know?" things, we decided to up the ante on the weird and wacky. So here's a list of the strangest laws regarding doges in the U.S. Some of these will make you go, "Whaaaaaaaaaat?" and some will make your jaw drop from disbelief.


Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations

1. You cannot tie your pet dog to the roof of a car in Anchorage, Alaska. I wonder why this basic nugget of common sensical truth had to be a law. Someone, somewhere is responsible for this.

2. In Little Rock, Arkansas, dogs are not allowed to bark after 6 PM. While excessive barking might be a problem, who are we to impose such a law on these poor pooches? It's like asking humans to stop talking after 6PM.

3. No dog is allowed to be in a public place without its master on a leash in Belvedere, California. This is actually a law! Someone was messin' with the rules and they did a pretty brilliant job of sneaking this gem in.

4. In Denver, Colorado, the dog catcher must notify dogs of impounding by posting (for three consecutive days) a notice on a tree in the city park and along a public road through said park to make sure dogs don't miss the notice. Looks like Colorado dogs read at a 7th grade level.

5. In Hartford, Connecticut, you aren't allowed to educate dogs. Aww drat my dog had his heart set on going away to college at the University of Hartford. He was planning on studying doge law too. Oh well. Guess he'll just have to go to Yale instead.

6. It's illegal to give a dog whiskey in Chicago, Illinois. What is this? Amateur hour? No alcohol period folks. Dogs and alcohol do not mix.

7. In Galesburg, Illinois, no person may keep a smelly dog. Smelly dog, smeeelly dog - what are they feeding? Smelly dog, smeeeelly dog... it's not your fault.

8. And in North Brook, Illinois, it's against the law for a dog to bark for more than 15 minutes. Looks like someone needs to invent a dog bark timer so that dogs can take the appropriate break after 15 minutes and start back up again.

9. Dogs are not allowed to molest cars in Fort Thomas, Kentucky. We're guessing all the bad boy pups come out at night and go around humping cars just to break this ridogulous law.

10. In International Falls, Minnesota, cats are not permitted to chase dogs up telephone poles. The more worrying issue here is that dogs in International Falls may have an identity crisis. Remember pups, dogs rule and cats drool. You do not want to be a cat.

11. Fights between cats and dogs are not allowed in Barber, North Carolina. And by default, the phrase, "Fighting like cats and dogs," is out as well!

11. In Oklahoma, dogs must have a permit signed by the mayor in order to congregate in groups of three or more on private property. Well, you know what they say: two's a company, and three's a pack.

12. Also in Oklahoma, people who make "ugly faces" at dogs are subject to fines and/or jail. Not really sure about how this law's implemented, since beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder.

13. A police officer in Palding, Ohio, may bite a dog to quiet him, as long as it is in the line of duty. Uhhh, what? Weird!

14. In Madison, Wisconsin, dogs are not allowed to worry squirrels in the public park next to the capitol. Because squirrels have to focus on passing important bills and laws and dogs just distract them from doing their civic duty and serving the people of Madison.

Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations








Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations
GOVERNMENTAL DOGS ORGANIZATIONS
This article proudly presented by
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Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs



Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dogs and Laws, Government and Dogs

Dog Laws








Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations
EFFECTIVE vs INEFFECTIVE
DOG LAWS

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We are able to enjoy the benefits of living with dogs (the human-canine bond) when we create safe, humane communities that are good for people and good for pets. The goal of animal control ordinances and pet ownership laws should be to raise the standards of pet ownership from problematic to acceptable. Doing so protects the interests of people with pets, people without pets, and the animals.


Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations

Effective laws support and promote human-canine bonds by clearly describing the standards of Responsible Pet Ownership practices expected by the community from all dog owners. They also outline the dog owner behaviors that the community will not tolerate.


Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations

A model set of acceptable and achievable standards includes:

1. Requiring that owners license their pets and provide permanent ID.

2. Facilitating and requiring the proper care, training, and socialization of pets.

3. Spaying and neutering pets if they are not part of a responsible breeding program.

4. Not allowing your pet(s) to become a threat or nuisance in the community.

5. Procuring your pet(s) ethically and from a credible source.


Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations

Ineffective laws have the opposite effect and pretty costly and very difficult to enforce. Ineffective laws are over and under-inclusive, it discourage compliance and responsible pet ownership practices.

1. Breed-specific or breed-discriminatory laws (BSL or BDL), which prohibit or restrict the keeping of dogs of specified breeds and/or mixed-breed dogs with similar physical characteristics.

2. Pet limit laws, which establish a maximum number of pets allowable per residence.

3. Tethering laws or ordinances with restrictions such as time limits, specific equipment requirements, temperature ranges, etc. that overly complicate enforcement.

4. Mandatory spay and neuter (S/N) laws that require the sterilization of dogs - usually those of a specified breed or mixed-breed dogs with specified or general physical characteristics.



Dogs and Laws, Governmetnal Dog Organizations




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