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PAIN, FEAR & ANXIETY
DOGICA® 3D World of Dog & Puppy

DOG PAIN, FEAR & ANXIETY















DOG PAIN, FEAR & SEPARATION ANXIETY
















DOG PAIN, FEAR & ANXIETY
Dog Separation Anxiety:
Common Symptoms & Signs, Reasons & Causes
Coping with Destructive, Obsessive & Compulsive Dog Behavior
Dog Anxiety Care, Cure & Prevention
Dog Pain, Fear & Separation Anxiety Signs
How do you know if your Dog has Separation Anxiety?
Which Dog Breeds have Separation Anxiety?
How much Benadryl can you Give a Dog
Dog Separation Anxiety Misconceptions
how to break Dog's Separation Anxiety
Dealing with Separation Anxiety in Puppies
Dog Separation Anxiety Cure & Medication
Dog Separation Anxiety Solutions
Jobs to Provide to Get Your Dog Busy
Petcube Camera Helps to Fight Dog Anxiety!
Do Puppies grow out of Separation Anxiety?
Curing Dog Separation Anxiety:
Treatment, Training & Rescue
Comforting A Fearful Dog Misconceptions
Dog Separation Anxiety vs Boredom
How to Calm a Fearful Dog
Dog Fear Body Language Signs
Dog Tail Fear & Agression Signs
Dog Anxiety & Fear Subordination and Happiness
Natural Healthy Homeopathic and Herbal Remedies
What Causes Separation Anxiety?
Why My Dog Has Separation Anxiety?
How to Comfort a Fearful Dog
Toys & Games to Fight Separation Anxiety!
Dog Separation Anxiety Habits
How to Know when Dog is In Pain?
How to Sozialize Fearful Dog & Puppy
Dog Separation Anxiety Natural Treatment
Dog Separation Anxiety Care & Cure
Relaxing Music & Video for your Dog
How to fix Dog Anxiety at Night
Dog Anxiety Remedies
Dog Home Alone
Xenophobic Dogs


One of the greatest joys of dog ownership is the tight bond we experience and encourage with our dogs.
Separation Anxiety is a disorder that causes dogs to panic at the idea of being left home alone.

Xenophobic (Fearful) Dogs:
Xenophobia means "fear or hatred of things strange or foreign." Dogs with xenophobic temperaments, due to genetics and/or puppyhood experiences, are more inclined to travel farther and are at a higher risk of being hit by cars. Due to their cowering, fearful behavior, people assume these dogs were "abused," and even if the dog has ID tags, they will refuse to contact the previous owner. Some of these panic-stricken dogs will even run from their owners! It may be necessary to use other dogs to get close enough to capture them or to use baited dog traps. Adopting two puppies together reduces the chances of separation anxiety.

What NOT to Do !!!
Do not scold or punish your dog.
Anxious behaviors are not the result of disobedience or spite.
They are distress responses! Your dog displays anxious behaviors when left alone because he is upset and trying to cope with a great deal of stress.

If you punish him, he may become even more upset and the problem could get much worse!

Separation anxiety has little to do with training or discipline - the behaviors are a result of the severe panic your dog feels when you are not there.

Left untreated, it causes damage to your house and belongings & serious psychological suffering for your dog.

Separation anxiety is diagnosed in around 15% of behavioural cases.

When left alone, most dogs find a familiar spot and go to sleep.

Somewhat ironically, problems related to separation anxiety are the major cause for dogs ending up in animal shelters. Very sadly it is the second leading cause of owners relinquishing dogs to dog pounds or euthanizing their dogs !!!



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DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY
DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY

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In a perfect world, we would all get to spend every single day with our dogs, but the reality is, separation happens. With preparation, training, and a little help, your time apart can be cheerful and worry-free-making your time together all the more sweet. The term gets tossed around casually, but separation anxiety is a very serious matter. True separation anxiety is your dog's panicked response to being left alone. The results, including the destruction of your belongings and the deterioration of your dog's mental and physical health can be devastating. Separation anxiety is very different from misbehavior. It's a misconception that when your dog digs up your prized orchids or urinates on your favorite rug, he is seeking revenge for having been left home alone. The best case explanation for such behavior is that he is bored, and the worst is that he is in a state of serious panic. The panic is so overwhelming that when you leave, dogs tend to become destructive, bark like crazy, and have housebreaking accidents. When you return home, their greetings are often frantic. But the good news is that, with effort, separation anxiety is treatable.

DOG FEAR CATEGORIES

It is anxiety that manifests itself as visible stress within 30 minutes of the departure of the dog’s person. The anxiety can vary from mild to severe. Separation anxiety is preventable and responds well when treated. The name says it all. Whenever you are not around, your dog is anxious, frightened or nervous. The severity of dog anxiety can vary, going from slight unease to full-blown anxiety attacks in more severe cases. Each dog is different, but most furballs cope with separation anxiety by being destructive or present characteristic physical symptoms. This is why people often mistake the lack of proper training or even some medical issues for this dog behavioral issue.

DOG FEAR CATEGORIES

Dogs might intense, persistent pacing & urinate, defecate, bark, howl, chew, dig or try to escape. Although these problems often indicate that a dog needs to be taught polite house manners, they can also be symptoms of distress. When a dog's problems are accompanied by other distress behaviors, such as drooling and showing anxiety when his pet parents prepare to leave the house, they are not evidence that the dog is not house trained or doesn't know which toys are his to chew. Instead, they are indications that the dog has separation anxiety. Separation anxiety is triggered when dogs become upset because of separation from their guardians, the people they are attached to. Escape attempts by dogs with separation anxiety are often extreme and can result in self-injury and household destruction, especially around exit points like windows and doors.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY & FEAR
Missing you
Domesticated dogs naturally prefer the companionship of their humans. It's one thing to have your dog follow you around the house amiably, however - it's quite another to learn that your dog howls relentlessly when you are at work or defecates in the house to show his displeasure at your absence. When your dog's behavior in your absence seems extreme, he might be experiencing separation anxiety. Some dogs suffering from separation anxiety become agitated when their guardians prepare to leave. Others seem anxious or depressed prior to their guardians' departure or when their guardians are not present. Some try to prevent their guardians from leaving. Usually, right after a guardian leaves a dog with separation anxiety, the dog will begin barking and displaying other distress behaviors within a short time after being left alone - often within minutes. When the guardian returns home, the dog acts as though it's been years since he is seen his mom or dad! One of the most common phrases used by owners to describe a dog that appears stressed when the owner leaves home or just leaves the room is separation anxiety in dogs. One of the possible definition of Separation Anxiety is dog problem behavior that shows itself through symptoms like excessive salivation, barking, whining, destroying items in the home, scratching at walls, doors and floors, and attempting to escape from the crate, or room. A dog may develop separation anxiety if there is a change in the owner's work schedule or change of environment. Dog separation anxiety is often unknowingly encouraged by dog owners. We make a big fuss when we leave or come home, and in doing so we reward the dog's concern with our absence, provoking in him even more stress every time we leave.

Dogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid - INFOGRAm, INFOGRAPHICS - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!

We like our dogs to be with us and when they are puppies, we take them everywhere for socialization. Then, we have to leave them alone, but they reach an age when they not only want, but also feel the need to be with us - we are their source of confidence, their security, and their pack. Anxiety often increases the longer the owner is gone and may result in behaviours such as whining, pacing, salivating, excessive licking, barking, howling, hyperactivity, scratching, chewing, digging, urinating or defecating and destruction of property. Dogs with separation anxiety also have an overly excited response when the owner returns home, even if they have only been gone a short while. Scolding or punishing the dog leads to more confusion, more anxiety and worse behaviour.

DOG ANXIETY
TRAINING VIDEO by CAESAR MILAN


A change in their routines can create the symptoms of dog separation anxiety, but destruction and stress can also be created by boredom and lack of exercise. Terriers are born to dig, retrievers to carry and protection breeds to protect. So, in some instances we are holding them back from their instincts and drives, rather than nurturing them.

Noise phobia - fear of thunderstorms, is also common in dogs. Do not comfort your pet - this may be interpreted as reward for his fearful response. Punishment will only cause more anxiety. Ask your veterinarian to suggest behaviour modification techniques or refer you to a behavioural specialist or trainer. Dog appeasing pheromones are also an innovative way, used along with other behaviour modification practices, to control and manage unwanted canine behaviour associated with fear and stress in adult dogs and puppies.

Read more about Dog Separation Anxiety Habit hereDogs Medicine, Veterinary, First Aid - INFOGRAm, INFOGRAPHICS - PRESS TO SEE IN FULL SIZE!

Separation anxiety is very common and a leading cause of behavioral problems. And while your dog may be unconditionally bonded to you, well adjusted dogs also know that you will return and do not display the frenetic activity of the anxious dog. Nobody really knows why some dogs develop separation anxiety. Your dog freaks out when you come home? Now this is more like it. Who doesn't love to be greeted by a dog who acts like you have been gone for a year? I know my dogs love me when I get home because they jump all over me even after they've been fed. But the true test is whether they do the same thing to anyone who walks in the house. Watch closely what your dog does when someone else comes in. If they do the same thing, I'm afraid your dog is just promiscuous.

DOG vs HUMAN MEMORY

Separation Anxiety vs Time
There is also research evidence for dogs' understanding of the concept of time based on changes in their behavior when left alone by their human companions for different lengths of time. Studies show that dogs display greater affection toward their owners if they have been separated for longer periods of time. As the amount of time away increases, so does the dogs' excitement. This will come as no surprise to dog owners - most canines get excited about the return of the master to the castle, especially after long absences. But this research is also important because it shows that dogs are capable of recognizing and responding to different spans of time.

DOG vs HUMAN MEMORY

For dogs that suffer from separation anxiety, the difference between one and five hours can mean the difference between mild agitation and a full-blown panic attack. Separation anxiety in dogs is often expressed as barking, howling, whining, chewing digging, pacing, scratching, and/or urinating and defecating in inappropriate places while an owner is away or upon his or her return.

Signs of Anxiety include, but does not limited to:
Fast wagging low tail
Whining or whimpering
Ears may be back
Hiding behind objects or people


Signs of Fear:
Dog will try to look small
Tail tucked
Hunched over, head down
Tense
May urinate submissively

So, Do Dogs Smile?

Dogs that normally display separation anxiety in their owner's absence are more likely to be affected by a permanent loss. However, many animals that aren't typically prone to stress may also be deeply affected by the loss of a loved one. You may notice that your pet initially seems to be panicked over the change and continues to act unlike her usual self in the days and even weeks following the passing of a loved one. As with people, how your four-legged friend displays and communicates her despair will be unique. And since we can't ask our pets about their feelings, it's important to keep an eye out for some of the common visible signs of depression in our furry friends. Often, these are similar to the same symptoms a human loved one might be suffering.

So, Do Dogs Smile?
Anxiety and Smiling
A smiley expression in a dog doesn't necessarily indicate happiness. If your dog's mouth is open just a tad, with the sides raised, he may indeed look like he's smiling, but he may actually be anxious, nervous or otherwise in distress. Signs of distress accompanying a stiff smile include heavy panting with the tongue in, whining and chattering teeth. Consult your vet.

So, Do Dogs Smile?

While dogs appear to be smiling, it is erroneous when it comes to semantics to call the teeth display a "smile". Because this grin is submissive in nature, a dog trainer well versed in dog body language or a behavior specialist, refers to this teeth display as a "submissive grin". As in primates, this submissive grin needs not to be confused with a snarl. In this case, the dog lifts the lips to show the fangs and the accompanying body language is hostile. There are several stories of dog owners calling a trainer or dog behaviorist concerned about a submissive grin.

So, Do Dogs Smile?

Sometimes dogs are more overt when they feel anxious and want to remove themselves from a situation. Please don't force a dog to stay in situation in which he feels anxious, especially if children are the source of his anxiety. Here are some examples:

the dog gets up and leaves an uncomfortable situation - he may bite rather than leaving one of these days

turning head away

hiding behind person or object

barking and retreating

the dog rolls over on back in submissive way.

Other Body Language Signs of Anxiety

tail between legs

tail low and only the end is wagging

tail between legs and wagging

tail down or straight for curly-tailed dog - husky, malamute, pug, chow chow, spitz-type dogs etc.

ears sideways for erect eared dog

ears back and very rapid panting

dog goes into another room away from you and urinates or defecates - Please find a professional behavior consultant for help with this - search our directory!

Dog Anxiety & Fear
Practice separation.
As tempting as it is, don't let Sparky be glued to your side all day. Letting your puppy have time to himself in his crate or room will help prevent separation anxiety.

Hellos and Goodbyes should be no big deal.
Don't make a fuss over your pup when you leave or come home. Again, prevents separation anxiety.

Separation anxiety is one of the most commonly discussed dog behavior problems in small dogs. Dogs who have been bred to be companions are very susceptible to separation anxiety because they feel they are not doing their job if their human is not right next to them. This disorder manifests itself in excessive vocalization, chewing, inappropriate urination and defecation, and other forms of destruction that occur when a dog is separated from his owner. Not all of these actions are the result of separation anxiety. Separation Anxiety can also lead to a dog eating feces or coprophagia.

Dog Anxiety & Fear

Signs of true separation anxiety include: Dog becomes anxious when owner prepares to leave, Misbehavior occurs in the first 15-45 minutes after owner leaves, Dog wants to follow owner around constantly, Dog tries to be touching owner whenever possible. True separation anxiety requires dedicated training, behavior modification and desensitization exercises. Medication may be recommended in extreme cases, but this should be a last resort. About the most common behavioral issues facing foster dogs and puppies including fear and separation anxiety, a likely undeserved reputation for what may have been perceived as "dominance," and irritating but usually solvable problems such as house soiling, chewing and barking.

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PUPPY SEPARATION ANXIETY
PUPPY SEPARATION ANXIETY

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Erika Mansourian

When you are raising a puppy there can be a parade of behavioral issues that march through his and your life. Separation anxiety can be one of them. Understanding and recognizing the problem is the first step. Then you will be equipped to address it right from the start. This is key because, as the Tufts Animal Behavior Clinic says, once canine behaviors are established, it takes time and work to change them. So it's better to prevent puppy separation anxiety before it starts and that time is in puppyhood.

New pet parents are often overwhelmed with excitement, responsibilities and general chaos that comes with having a new puppy in their home. Sure, most people start training their dogs while they are still young but overlook prevention. However, preventing separation anxiety disorder from developing during the puppy stage might be one of the best things you can do for your dog.

PUPPY SEPARATION ANXIETY
What is puppy separation anxiety?
It's fairly straightforward: Whether in a puppy or an adult dog, separation anxiety is when your dog exhibits stress and/or behavioral problems when left alone. Sadly, it is also one of the most common reasons why owners get rid of their dogs. This is especially unfortunate because it is an issue that can be treated by implementing a few simple but important tactics. Here's the good news: As the responsible owner of a new puppy, hopefully you have laid the foundation for a well-adjusted, well-behaved dog through puppy training, socialization, crate training, and the investment of time and consistency. Therefore, many of the recommendations here are things you are already doing, or have done.

PUPPY SEPARATION ANXIETY
What is the difference between separation anxiety and normal canine behavior?
Separation anxiety is a serious condition, and it goes beyond the occasional mournful whimper when you leave the house or the shredded sock waiting for you upon your return. It is also not the same as boredom, and unlike a little mischief when your dog is left alone, separation anxiety is the result of legitimate stress. Genuine separation anxiety is not just your puppy's anxiety when you leave it continues to plague your dog until the moment you return.

PUPPY SEPARATION ANXIETY
What are the signs of puppy separation anxiety?
Here are some of the behaviors you dog may exhibit. One or two of them, that happen occasionally, may not be a sign of puppy separation anxiety, but if he has multiple episodes of more than a few of them, he is most likely suffering from SA.

Excessive barking or howling.

Destructive acts, such as chewing furniture and frantic scratching at doors or windows

Indoor "accidents" - urinating or defecting in the house

Excessive salivation, drooling, or panting

Intense pacing

If confined, prolonged attempts to escape.

PUPPY SEPARATION ANXIETY
What causes puppy separation anxiety?
It is unclear why some puppies are more prone to separation anxiety than others. There is some anecdotal evidence to suggest it's more common in shelter dogs, who may have been abandoned or suffered the loss of an important person in their life. The more people-oriented breeds may likewise be more susceptible. Also, smaller dogs can be prone to separation anxiety if they are accustomed to near-constant companionship. Life changes can also cause the condition, including a sudden change in schedule, a move to a new house, or the sudden absence of a family member, whether it's a divorce, a death in the family, or a child leaving for college.

PUPPY SEPARATION ANXIETY
What can I do about puppy separation anxiety?
Neither you nor your puppy wants this constant cycle to continue. It's difficult seeing a beloved pet under so much stress and just as difficult to come home to mayhem and destruction. While there's no magic bullet, there are some things you should try. As said, these methods should already be part of a puppy's routine, but they are also specific to addressing SA.

Crate Training
It's well-established, but it always bears repeating: The crate is your dog's ally, and it's an important training tool and the solution for a number of puppy challenges. It's neither cruel nor unhealthy. Look at it this way: For millennia dogs have been "den animals." In the wild, they use small, enclosed spaces for protection, warmth, and to raise their puppies. This hardwired instinct can be employed to give your pup a safe, quiet place to retreat to. Especially when you're not home. Some dogs feel safer and more comfortable in their crate when left alone. Watch his behavior in the crate to see if he settles right down or if the anxiety symptoms ramp up. Crate training is a subject unto itself, so here is everything you need to know.

Conditioning
Conditioning is an important element of raising a mentally and physically healthy new puppy. In some cases, you can try to relieve his dismay by teaching him that separation has its rewards. Right now, he is conditioned to go into stress mode when he knows you are leaving him. Try countering that reaction by using a "high value" treat - something he especially loves, and that you only bring out for important lessons and rewards. If he gets a treat right before you leave, he might even begin to look forward to your departure. Begin conditioning your puppy early on by leaving him for very short periods of time and gradually lengthening the amount of time you are gone.

Exercise
Lab puppy playing with toy.Physical: Make sure your puppy gets plenty of exercise. This is especially true for large, high-energy dogs with a lot of it to burn off. A tired, contented dog, who's had a brisk walk and playtime with you, is more likely to settle down when you leave.

Mental Exersize
Mental exercise is just as important as physical, if not more. Games that build his self-control, focus, and patience are key to him getting better when alone." Kilcommons' book, My Smart Puppy, provides games that will develop and occupy that busy puppy brain.

Medication and Natural Supplements
Sometimes, no amount of training and conditioning will help. Some vets recommend medication such as amitriptyline, which is used to treat depression, or alprazolam, which is prescribed for anxiety and panic disorders. These require a prescription and are safe for most pets, though you will need to consult with your vet, and be extra diligent about the use of medication with a young dog.

Natural Supplements & Diet
Another option is natural supplements and homeopathic treatment. Natural supplements that help ease anxiety in dogs include the amino acid L-theanine, chamomile, passionflower, St. John's Wort, and valerian. The natural supplements help ease anxiety in dogs because they have various mechanisms of action that basically function to alter neurotransmitters in the brain - such as serotonin, GABA, or dopamine, to induce a sense of peace and calmness.

Nothing is Free
Follow a "nothing in life is free" protocol. It's important for puppies to learn that they must earn the things they want. Ask your puppy to sit before being fed, going out to play, even being petted.

Play it Cool
DO NOT pay attention to your dog when he follows you around closely. Most behaviors considered "attention seeking" can be modified by ignoring them. When you are about to leave, try not to give cues that your pup will begin to recognize. In other words, depart calmly and without fanfare. The daily routine can be established that provides stability and predictability for the puppy, beginning with meeting the dog's social and physical needs, followed by sessions of inattention during which the dog is given the opportunity to nap and rest or to engage in exploratory play with his food and chew toys. Keep greetings and departures low-key. Help your puppy associate your departure cues with good things. Never reward or encourage attention-seeking behavior. If you are wondering if puppies grow out of separation anxiety, the answer is not that straightforward. In cases where dog stress symptoms in puppies are just caused by their young age, it's possible. But, your puppy won't kick their destructive or negative behaviors overnight, as much as you might want or pray.

PUPPY SEPARATION ANXIETY

Please, keep in mind - Separation anxiety in puppies and dogs is not always preventable, despite your best efforts. But with patience and a positive attitude, you may be able to reduce your puppy's suffering.








THE GENOME OF DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY
THE GENOME OF
DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY

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Ron Hines

What Causes Separation Anxiety?
Dogs are pack animals by nature. In the wild, dogs are hardly, if ever, alone. This is the reason why they get nervous when they are left alone and many dogs will suffer from this anxiety when they are separated from the people within the family that they perceive as their pack! While the main cause of separation anxiety is being left alone, there are numerous other causes, including changes in routine, breeding instincts and loud noises or other things that jolt the senses.The Broad Institute has made great progress in mapping the complete gene catalog - genome of dogs. They have also made great progress in understanding which genes favor compulsive and aggressive behavior in dogs. That does not mean that love, patience, training and or medication can not improve your dog's situation. It might also help you understanding that we pet owners, and our pet's earlier traumas might not be entirely responsible for our dog's current psychological issues. Many pet owners who write to me feel that guilt and frustration. There is really no reason for them to feel that way. Try not to.








DIAGNOSING DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY SYMPTOMS & SIGNS - HOME ALONE
DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY:
COMMON SYMPTOMS & SIGNS
HOME ALONE

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Brad Wells

You can diagnose SA by noting its signs and symptoms in your pet. After all, you know your pet better than any veterinarian can. Separation anxiety is not the same as boredom, which can also result in chewing, pawing, digging, and other bad behavior.

Dog Anxiety & Fear

Signs of SA in dogs are: Barking, Whining, Licking Destructive Behavior, Chewing, Howling, Panic Attacks, Digging, Inappropriate Urinating, House Soiling, Self Mutilation, Escaping, Diarrhea, Loss Of Appetite, Excessive Salivation, Vomiting, Jumping Through Windows, Fearfulness - Worry, Apprehensiveness, Clinginess, Hyperactivity, Crying, Barking and Yelping, Defecating in the house, Depression or Aggressiveness - when they are about to be left alone or think they are about to be. Some over-eat, some under-eat. Some twitch their ears, pace, pant, hide or jump and bounce about. Some dogs can be left alone for no longer than a few minutes before they panic and exhibit these behaviors. Sometimes separation anxiety is caused by a change in schedule that requires the pet to be left alone for longer that normal. Unidentified changes in older dogs may also cause sudden separation anxiety, which can be mistaken for senility. What your dog is thinking is that it is about to loose its main friend and that you will not be returning. It is preoccupation with this that sets off the cycle.

Dog Anxiety & Fear

There are many telltale dog separation anxiety signs. Some are really true dog anxiety symptoms, while others could be false positives - indications of different dog behavior problems, potentially medical in nature or different altogether. It's important to understand what are symptoms of anxiety and what is just a false alarm. Before jumping to the anxiety conclusion, make sure that your dog's dog anxiety symptoms are not an indicator of a different problem, whether medical in nature or caused by a lack of exercise, training or simply boredom. Here are some common problems that can present as separation anxiety disorder.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY SYMPTOMS & SIGNS - BY WWW.PETCUBE.COM !
Why are some dogs unsettled when left alone?
There are many reasons why a dog may develop problems when home alone – these are the most common:

The dog has never been left alone in the home regularly or separated from a particular person.

There is something that the dog is scared of or worried by either inside the house or outside. This could be something that happens on a daily basis - the postman arriving or something that happened only once - a severe thunderstorm. Dogs tend to feel much more vulnerable when they are on their own, so it is easy for them to develop specific fears, especially those who have a sensitive or nervous nature.

An animal companion dies. Normally this would be another dog who shared a close bond with the dog who is left behind, but strong attachments can also be made with other species too, like cats.

Boredom. Typically this affects young, energetic dogs who struggle when left to their own devices. If left alone for too long - especially when not exercised enough, these dogs may find their own entertainment, such as chewing table legs or raiding the rubbish bins.

Dogs who have been in rescue or have been rehomed several times can sometimes struggle with being left, especially in the first few weeks of being rehomed. This is probably due to a variety of factors, including the stresses experienced while in kennels and learning to adapt to a new home.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY SYMPTOMS & SIGNS

The following is a list of symptoms that may indicate separation anxiety:

Urinating and Defecating
Some dogs urinate or defecate when left alone or separated from their guardians. If a dog urinates or defecates in the presence of his guardian, his house soiling probably is not caused by separation anxiety.

Barking and Howling
A dog who has separation anxiety might bark or howl when left alone or when separated from his guardian. This kind of barking or howling is persistent and doesn't seem to be triggered by anything except being left alone.

Chewing, Digging and Destruction
Some dogs with separation anxiety chew on objects, door frames or window sills, dig at doors and doorways, or destroy household objects when left alone or separated from their guardians. These behaviors can result in self-injury, such as broken teeth, cut and scraped paws and damaged nails. If a dog's chewing, digging and destruction are caused by separation anxiety, they don't usually occur in his guardian's presence.

Escaping
A dog with separation anxiety might try to escape from an area where he is confined when he is left alone or separated from his guardian. The dog might attempt to dig and chew through doors or windows, which could result in self-injury, such as broken teeth, cut and scraped front paws and damaged nails. If the dog's escape behavior is caused by separation anxiety, it doesn't occur when his guardian is present.

Pacing
Some dogs walk or trot along a specific path in a fixed pattern when left alone or separated from their guardians. Some pacing dogs move around in circular patterns, while others walk back and forth in straight lines. If a dog's pacing behavior is caused by separation anxiety, it usually does not occur when his guardian is present.

Coprophagia
When left alone or separated from their guardians, some dogs defecate and then consume all or some of their excrement. If a dog eats excrement because of separation anxiety, he probably doesn't perform that behavior in the presence of his guardian.

Chewing Recently Touched Stuff
After this frantic period, your dog may settle down to chew something that you have recently touched that still carries your scent. Dogs will often chew scented items into small pieces and curl up in the debris so that your dog forms a "barrier" of your scent around them for security.

Over-Excitement
On your return, your dog may appear elated and may become very excitable. They may be wet, either from salivating or excessively drinking due to stress.

Following You...
When you are home, your dog may attempt to follow you wherever you go in the house. They may begin to display anxious behaviours when they see you preparing to leave the house - panting, pacing.

Excessive Barking or Howling
Howling, screaming, crying or barking either for a half hour after the owner leaves, half an hour before the owner returns, or the entire time the owner is gone. Some dogs bark or howl in response to various triggers in their environments, like unfamiliar sights and sounds. They usually vocalize when their guardians are home as well as when they are away. For more information about this kind of problem, please see our articles, Barking and Howling.



Anorexia:
Dogs with separation anxiety often don't touch food or treats while their owner is gone. A bored dog, on the other hand, will happily eat in his owner's absence.

After the Diagnosis Made..
Once an accurate diagnosis has been made, treatment is usually a combination of medication and behavior modification, depending on the severity of the condition. Medication can play an important role in the treatment of genuine canine separation anxiety. It can provide a window of opportunity to undertake behavior modification techniques in real-life settings, something that can be difficult to implement without pharmacological assistance. Sometimes real life raises criteria too fast for effective behavior modification - medication can provide a necessary advantage and relieve a beloved pet of discomfort and anxiety.








DOG SEPARATION REASONS & CAUSES
DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY:
COMMON REASONS & CAUSES

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What causes separation anxiety?
Genetic predisposition: There is evidence that certain dogs may be genetically predisposed to anxiety-related conditions.

Thunderstorm phobia: Thunderstorm phobia and separation anxiety tend to go hand in hand.

Never learning to be alone: Separation anxiety may be more likely, or more severe, in dogs that have never successfully learned to be alone, such as dogs who have always lived with another dog, or whose owners are always home. As a social species, it's not instinctual for dogs to be completely alone, and this behavior must be learned at a young age.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY SYMPTOMS & SIGNS

Why Do Some Dogs Develop Separation Anxiety?
There is no conclusive evidence showing exactly why dogs develop separation anxiety. However, because far more dogs who have been adopted from shelters have this behavior problem than those kept by a single family since puppyhood, it is believed that loss of an important person or group of people in a dog's life can lead to separation anxiety. Other less dramatic changes can also trigger the disorder. The following is a list of situations that have been associated with development of separation anxiety.

Change of Guardian or Family
Being abandoned, surrendered to a shelter or given to a new guardian or family can trigger the development of separation anxiety.

Change in Schedule
An abrupt change in schedule in terms of when or how long a dog is left alone can trigger the development of separation anxiety. For example, if a dog's guardian works from home and spends all day with his dog but then gets a new job that requires him to leave his dog alone for six or more hours at a time, the dog might develop separation anxiety because of that change.

Change in Residence
Moving to a new residence even with the same family can trigger the development of separation anxiety.

Change in Household Membership
New baby arrival or sudden absence of a resident family member, either due to death or moving away, can trigger the development of separation anxiety.

Incomplete House Training
A dog who occasionally urinates in the house might not be completely house trained. His house training might have been inconsistent or it might have involved punishment that made him afraid to eliminate while his owner is watching or nearby. For help with house training, please see our articles, House Training Your Adult Dog and House Training Your Puppy.

Urine Marking
Some dogs urinate in the house because they are scent marking. A dog scent marks by urinating small amounts on vertical surfaces. Most male dogs and some female dogs who scent mark raise a leg to urinate. For more information about urine marking and how to resolve it, please see our article, Urine Marking in Dogs.

Time spent at the veterinary clinic
Not very clear how, but a fact.

Juvenile Destruction
Many young dogs engage in destructive chewing or digging while their guardians are home as well as when they are away. Please see our articles, Destructive Chewing and Digging, for more information about these problems.

Incontinence Caused by Medical Problems
Some dogs' house soiling is caused by incontinence, a medical condition in which a dog "leaks" or voids his bladder. Dogs with incontinence problems often seem unaware that they have soiled. Sometimes they void urine while asleep. A number of medical issues, including a urinary tract infection, a weak sphincter caused by old age, hormone-related problems after spay surgery, bladder stones, diabetes, kidney disease, Cushing's disease, neurological problems and abnormalities of the genitalia can cause urinary incontinence in dogs. Before attempting behavior modification for separation anxiety, please see your dog's veterinarian to rule out medical issues.

Medications
There are a number of medications that can cause frequent urination and house soiling. If your dog takes any medications, please contact his veterinarian to find out whether or not they might contribute to his house-soiling problems.

Behaviour Problems which Rule to Dog Anxiety
Sometimes it's difficult to determine whether a dog has separation anxiety or not. Some common behavior problems can cause similar symptoms.

Submissive or Excitement Urination
Some dogs may urinate during greetings, play, physical contact or when being reprimanded or punished. Such dogs tend to display submissive postures during interactions, such as holding the tail low, flattening the ears back against the head, crouching or rolling over and exposing the belly.

Your Vacation
If you have been on vacation or unemployed for some time and have been spending heaps of time with your dog. As a result of this when you go back to work your dog becomes anxious and distressed.

Incomplete House Training
A dog who occasionally urinates in the house might not be completely house trained. His house training might have been inconsistent or it might have involved punishment that made him afraid to eliminate while his owner is watching or nearby.

Urine Marking
Some dogs urinate in the house because they are scent marking. A dog scent marks by urinating small amounts on vertical surfaces. Most male dogs and some female dogs who scent mark raise a leg to urinate.

Juvenile Destruction
Many young dogs engage in destructive chewing or digging while their guardians are home as well as when they are away. Please see our articles, Destructive Chewing, for more information about these problems.

Boredom
Dogs need mental stimulation, and some dogs can be disruptive when left alone because they are bored and looking for something to do. These dogs usually don't appear anxious.








DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY vs PUNISHMENT
SEPARATION ANXIETY vs PUNISHMENT

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The PUNISHMENT WON'T HELP! It is natural for owners to be angry or disappointed if they return to find damage to their home, mess in the house or annoyed neighbours. Sensing that their owners are upset with them, many dogs will display "appeasement behaviour" - their ears may go flat, their body may be lowered and their tail may go between their legs. Some will look away and narrowing their eyes, as if they are cringing. Appeasement behaviour is often misinterpreted as guilt, and mistakenly some owners believe the dog knows what they have done is wrong. They may feel that any damage caused or mess in the house has been done on purpose or out of spite for being left alone. Unfortunately, this may mean that the dog is punished in an attempt to stop the behaviour. Dogs that look guilty are doing nothing more than responding to an owner's disappointment, upset or anger and it is their way of diffusing tension in response to feeling threatened. Some dogs will also do this if they think they are about to be told off if they have been so in the past.

Dog Anxiety & Fear

Any punishment given on returning home won't help stop the problem. Dogs associate punishment with what they are doing at that moment in time and so a dog will not link the telling off with their actions before their owner came home, even if they are taken over to the scene of the crime. It is not that they cannot remember what happened - they just won't be able to make a connection between the punishment and something they did hours ago. Punishment is not only useless but it is also likely to make the problem worse. Now, as well as being anxious about being left, a dog will also be worried about the owner returning, which can make any symptoms much, much worse.








DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY vs BOREDOM
DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY vs BOREDOM

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Boredom
Dogs can experience boredom from just a general lack of daily stimulation. Walking the same path every day, little or no play time, and no socialization can all lead to a mundane life. Dogs will soon look for their own entertainment which leads to chewing, barking, and other destructive means to pass the time. Many owners will mistake this misbehavior as separation anxiety, believing that this is an act of revenge for leaving them behind. However, a simple case of boredom is easily addressed by just taking your dog to explore new places, socializing, training, or introducing new stimulating toys.

Separation Anxiety
Separation anxiety exhibits much more extreme responses, and your dog will suffer from a real sense of stress while left alone. Think of it from your dog's perspective, from the time they are born were always in the company of dogs and other people. Every cry for attention receives an immediate response from their pack or their owner. The shock and emotional distress of being away from their "pack" is difficult to overcome, and one that many, many owners face. Different breeds can show different levels of anxiety: Huskies, Hounds, and Labradors for example, can show very extreme cases of separation anxiety. While Terriers tend to bark and dig and show destructive behavior. Just know that there are exceptions to every breed.

Learned Separation Anxiety
Some dogs may exhibit signs of separation anxiety or boredom, but it may just be a learned response. One example is overly excitedly greeting your dog when you get home, your dog will learn to jump and bark every time you return. Your dog has indirectly been trained bad behaviors when you walk through the door, but may or may not have true separation anxiety. By watching the signs you can determine if they are truly bored or stressed from being alone.

Signs of Boredom or Misbehavior
Chewing
Barking
Digging

Signs of Separation Anxiety
Extreme destruction of property

They attempt to escape your home while you are away

Having daily "accidents" even though they are potty trained

Barking and howling as soon as your leave

Neighbors complaining of noise everyday. Hurting themselves trying to escape

Pacing your home and appears nervous

Being very clingy

Barking, jumping, and screaming when you come home.








DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY - STIMULATED vs REAL TRUE !
DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY:
STIMULATED vs REAL

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Martin Deeley

There is true separation anxiety, and there is simulated separation anxiety, in which the dog behavior appears to be separation anxiety but it is, in fact, a learned behavior. Simulated separation anxiety is often manifested when the dog lacks leadership as well as self-control. True separation anxiety, on the other hand, causes the dog to experience real stress during the absence of his owner. In simulated separation anxiety, the dog knows that he will get attention if he acts badly. For some dogs, even being verbally reprimanded for such behavior is rewarding because he feels he was noticed. Negative attention can be a reward in many cases, if the owner is unaware that certain needs of his dog are not being met. In these cases, there is little real stress involved, just misbehavior. Simulated separation anxiety is fairly easy to overcome with a gradual approach, slowly increasing the amount of time spent in a crate, when you are at home as well as away - consistent obedience training, proper amounts of exercise, and strong leadership. Severe cases of true separation anxiety impose a challenge to Pack Leaders.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY - STIMULATED vs REAL TRUE !

Although it's not a true anxiety disorder, simulated separation anxiety has exactly the same dog stress symptoms. So how do you tell the difference? Unlike dogs, who suffer from separation anxiety disorder, canines who simulate this behavior are not motivated by fear or nervousness. It's simply a learned, attention-seeking behavior. For example, if your furball really wants to sleep in your bed but isn't allowed to, he might start whining in front of your door or peeing in the hallway when they don't get their way. This can lead you to mistake an attention-seeking behavior for a form of dog separation anxiety at night.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY - STIMULATED vs REAL TRUE !

The most important thing you can remember is not to indulge your pooch when they are exhibiting destructive behavior. When you reward them after they do something unwanted or forbidden, you are actually encouraging them to misbehave. Thankfully, simulated separation anxiety can be easily corrected. Simply stop paying attention to your pooch's dramatics and when they see they won't get their way by being destructive, they will be on their best behavior.








DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY and MISBEHAVIOR - HOW TO DISTINGUISH, KNOW?
SEPARATION ANXIETY vs MISBEHAVIOR:
HOW TO DISTINGUISH AND KNOW

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Do unwanted behaviors occur ONLY when you are NOT around?
Separation anxiety is triggered by the absence of the dog's "person." Disturbing behaviors always occur when the dog's human is gone and occur only when that person is gone. So, for example, if your dog always chews the woodwork when you are gone and never chews the woodwork when you are there, he may have separation anxiety. But if your dog chews woodwork whether you are around or not, perhaps more management or appropriate chew toys are the solution.

Incontinence
This medical issue can be a symptom of kidney disease, UTIs, diabetes and a myriad of other illnesses. If your dog suddenly starts peeing in the house, check with your vet first to rule out any potential health issues.

Medication side-effects
If your pooch is on any medications, high anxiety symptoms like excessive salivation, lack of appetite, pooping or peeing inside, or even anxiety itself can simply be a side effect of the drug. Consult your vet to rule out medications as a cause.

Submissive or Excitement Urination
Some dogs may pee during greetings, play-time, during physical contact or when being reprimanded or punished. These dogs tend to display submissive postures, such as holding their tail low, flattening their ears back against their head, or rolling over and exposing their bellies. Dog body language is, in this case, an indicator of a personality type and not stress.

Urine Marking
Some dogs famously urinate inside because they are scent marking. Dog mark their scent by peeing a little on walls or other vertical surfaces. This is especially common with dogs who are not neutered or spayed.

Youthful Destruction
Young dogs are known to be particularly destructive with their chewing or digging, even if you are at home.

Boredom
Dogs need mental stimulation, and some dogs act out when alone because they are bored and looking for something to do. This type of attention-seeking behavior is not caused by distress and these dogs usually don't appear anxious.

Incomplete House Training
Dogs that urinate inside might not be 100% house trained. The same goes for a dog pooping in the house - unless the dog poops in the house after being outside, in which case it might be anxiety pooping. It's also possible house training was an inconsistent or involved punishment that made them afraid to relieve themselves while their owner was watching or nearby.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY and MISBEHAVIOR - HOW TO DISTINGUISH, KNOW?
The Difference Between Misbehavior & Bad Habits
and Separation Anxiety

Not all unwanted behaviors qualify as separation anxiety; in fact, most do not. If you come home to find your dog chewing on your old house slippers, in all probability he simply finds the activity enjoyable and uses your absence as a chance to gnaw away, uninterrupted. Or he may just be bored. Several factors indicate that the problem is serious:

The behavior occurs every time you leave.

The behavior occurs only in your absence.

Anxious behaviors begin even before you go. For example, your dog knows that when you put on your jacket, you are about to leave the house. The minute you reach for your jacket, he begins pacing and howling. Happily, separation anxiety is preventable if you are starting with a puppy. The key is teaching him that leaving him alone actually means good things - the goal is for him to associate your departure with something positive.

The difference is that boredom, for example, can be overcome by adding more exercise and mental stimulation to your dog's day; those things have little or no impact on separation anxiety. Try adding an extra walk, games of fetch or tug-of-war, an obedience class and a variety of toys. If boredom is the reason for the barking and chewing, you should see a big change in your dog's behavior.DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY
GUIDE FOR DIGANOSIS & CURE
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DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY and ISOLATION
ISOLATION vs SEPARATION ANXIETY

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Dogs, like us are very social animals. They would naturally live in family groups and have "evolved" alongside humans over thousands of years to "work" with us and live as our companions. Most dogs would choose to spend the majority of their time in our company. Some might actually prefer the company of their own kind, but what is certain, is that being alone just doesn't come naturally for most. Although dogs should never be left for too long on their own, if they get used to being left for short periods when young, they are likely to grow up feeling relaxed and comfortable when left on their own for some part of the day. Here is some advice to help you feel more confident about leaving your dog at home...

The Difference Between Isolation and Separation Anxiety
Distress over being left alone is not always a full-blown separation anxiety problem. First, a dog may suffer from a mild distress to a severe anxiety disorder. Distress indicates a lower intensity of stress behaviors when the dog is alone, while "anxiety" is an extreme panic attack. The distinction between "isolation" and "separation" is equally important. Isolation distress means the dog doesn't want to be left alone - any old human will do for company, and sometimes even another dog will fill the bill. True separation distress or anxiety means the dog is hyper-bonded to one specific person, and continues to show stress behaviors if that person is absent, even if other humans or dogs are present.








DOG BREEDS MORE AFFECTABLE by SEPARATION ANXIETY
AFFECTABLE DOG BREEDS
BY SEPARATION ANXIETY

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DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY SYMPTOMS & SIGNS - BY WWW.PETCUBE.COM !










DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY MODERATION
DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY MODERATION

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Stan Rawlinson

Here are two things to remember when trying to treat and soothe your dog:

Don't get into a shouting match! Yelling back just stimulates your dog to bark more because they think you are joining in. Be calm and firm, but don't raise your voice.

Stay consistent with your training. Most dogs won't understand if you suddenly command them to "shut up." Use the same keyword so that your dog will understand a word like "Quiet!" and respond.

Step One:
Predeparture Cues

A Necessary Component of Separation Anxiety Treatment
During desensitization to any type of fear, it is essential to ensure that your dog never experiences the full-blown version of whatever provokes his anxiety or fear. He must experience only a low-intensity version that doesn't frighten him. Otherwise, he won't learn to feel calm and comfortable in situations that upset him. This means that during treatment for separation anxiety, your dog cannot be left alone except during your desensitization sessions. Fortunately there are plenty of alternative arrangements. When treating a dog with separation anxiety, the goal is to resolve the dog’s underlying anxiety by teaching him to enjoy, or at least tolerate, being left alone. This is accomplished by setting things up so that the dog experiences the situation that provokes his anxiety, namely being alone, without experiencing fear or anxiety.

Dog Anxiety & Fear

Some dogs begin to feel anxious while their guardians get ready to leave. For example, a dog might start to pace, pant and whine when he notices his guardian applying makeup, putting on shoes and a coat, and then picking up a bag or car keys. If your dog doesn't show signs of anxiety when you are preparing to leave him alone, you can just skip to step two below. Guardians of dogs who become upset during predeparture rituals are unable to leave - even for just few seconds without triggering their dogs' extreme anxiety. Your dog may see telltale cues that you are leaving - like your putting on your coat or picking up your keys and get so anxious about being left alone that he can't control himself and forgets that you will come back. One treatment approach to this "predeparture anxiety" is to teach your dog that when you pick up your keys or put on your coat, it doesn't always mean that you are leaving. You can do this by exposing your dog to these cues in various orders several times a day without leaving. For example, put on your boots and coat, and then just watch TV instead of leaving. Or pick up your keys, and then sit down at the kitchen table for awhile. This will reduce your dog's anxiety because these cues won't always lead to your departure, and so your dog won't get so anxious when he sees them. Please be aware, though, that your dog has many years of learning the significance of your departure cues, so in order to learn that the cues no longer predict your long absences, your dog must experience the fake cues many, many times a day for many weeks. After your dog doesn't become anxious when he sees you getting ready to leave, you can move on to the next step below.

Step Two:
Graduated Departures/Absences

If your dog is less anxious before you leave, you can probably skip the predeparture treatment above and start with very short departures. The main rule is to plan your absences to be shorter than the time it takes for your dog to become upset. To get started, train your dog to perform out-of-sight stays by an inside door in the home, such as the bathroom. You can teach your dog to sit or down and stay while you go to the other side of the bathroom door. You can also contact a Certified Professional Dog Trainer for assistance. Gradually increase the length of time you wait on the other side of the door, out of your dog's sight. You can also work on getting your dog used to predeparture cues as you practice the stay. For example, ask your dog to stay. Then put on your coat, pick up your purse and go into the bathroom while your dog continues to stay.

Dog Anxiety & Fear

Progress to doing out-of-sight stay exercises at a bedroom door, and then later at an exit door. If you always leave through the front door, do the exercises at the back door first. By the time you start working with your dog at exit doors, he should not behave anxiously because he has a history of playing the "stay game."

At this point, you can start to incorporate very short absences into your training. Start with absences that last only last one to two seconds, and then slowly increase the time you are out of your dog's sight. When you have trained up to separations of five to ten seconds long, build in counterconditioning by giving your dog a stuffed food toy just before you step out the door. The food-stuffed toy also works as a safety cue that tells the dog that this is a "safe" separation.

If possible, take your dog to work with you.

Arrange for a family member, friend or dog sitter to come to your home and stay with your dog when you are not there. Most dogs suffering from separation anxiety are fine as long as someone is with them. That someone doesn't necessarily need to be you.

Take your dog to a sitter’s house or to a doggy daycare.

Many dogs suffering from separation anxiety are okay when left in a car. You can try leaving your dog in a car, but only if the weather is moderate. Be warned: dogs can suffer from heatstroke and die if left in cars in warm weather - 70 degrees Fahrenheit and up, even for just a few minutes. DO NOT leave your dog in a car unless you are sure that the interior of your car won't heat up.

During your sessions, be sure to wait a few minutes between absences. After each short separation, it's important to make sure that your dog is completely relaxed before you leave again. If you leave again right away, while your dog is still excited about your return from the previous separation, he will already feel aroused when he experiences the next absence. This arousal might make him less able to tolerate the next separation, which could make the problem worse rather than better.

Controlling Resources is Vital: When a dog has a strong consistent leader/controller of resources, it has a calming effect on him. He feels safe and taken care of. In the absence of a strong controller, your dog feels obligated to assume that position in the social hierarchy of the family pack. Since a leader must control all that goes on, his inability to control you leaving causes him stress and anxiety. They sometimes exhibit dominant behaviour to try to stop owners from leaving.

Leave Radio open! Routine is the key to overcoming Separation AnxietyLeave the Radio One: Tune a radio to a talk station - not music unless it is classical which most dogs find soothing. Put it on in a room you are often in, but not in the same room as the dog, and close the door. The dog will hear the human voices from your room and may not feel so alone. BUT DO NOT treat anxiety by just leaving the radio or TV on. Leaving the radio or TV on can distract a bored dog while you’re away. However, if your pet truly suffers from separation anxiety and isn’t simply bored, the extra noise won’t help. An exception would be if you have trained your dog to recognize TV or radio noise as an safety cue, in which case you should continue using these as part of your training routine.

Remember to behave in a very calm and quiet manner when going out and coming in. This will lower the contrast between times when you are there and times when you are gone.

You must judge when your dog is able to tolerate an increase in the length of separation. Each dog reacts differently, so there are no standard timelines. Deciding when to increase the time that your dog is alone can be very difficult, and many pet parents make errors. They want treatment to progress quickly, so they expose their dogs to durations that are too long, which provokes anxiety and worsens the problem. To prevent this kind of mistake, watch for signs of stress in your dog. These signs might include dilated pupils, panting, yawning, salivating, trembling, pacing and exuberant greeting. If you detect stress, you should back up and shorten the length of your departures to a point where your dog can relax again. Then start again at that level and progress more slowly.

Leave Kongs stuffed with peanut butter or cottage cheese ready for him to dig into as soon as you leave.

Hide small treats around the house or in his crate. Make sure his favorite toys are tucked safely in places he knows to search. This gives him something to do while you are gone and helps eliminate boredom.

Tire him out. See that he receives plenty of physical and mental exercise and that he gets lots of time with you. When you do leave, he will be more content to sleep or just take it easy.

You will need to spend a significant amount of time building up to 40-minute absences because most of your dog's anxious responses will occur within the first 40 minutes that he is alone. This means that over weeks of conditioning, you will increase the duration of your departures by only a few seconds each session, or every couple of sessions, depending on your dog's tolerance at each level. Once your dog can tolerate 40 minutes of separation from you, you can increase absences by larger chunks of time - 5-minute increments at first, then later 15-minute increments. Once your dog can be alone for 90 minutes without getting upset or anxious, he can probably handle four to eight hours. Just to be safe, try leaving him alone for four hours at first, and then work up to eight full hours over a few days.

This treatment process can be accomplished within a few weeks if you can conduct several daily sessions on the weekends and twice-daily sessions during the work week, usually before leaving for work and in the evenings.

In addition to your graduated absences exercises, all greetings - hellos and goodbyes :) should be conducted in a very calm manner. When saying goodbye, just give your dog a pat on the head, say goodbye and leave. Similarly, when arriving home, say hello to your dog and then do not pay any more attention to him until he is calm and relaxed. The amount of time it takes for your dog to relax once you have returned home will depend on his level of anxiety and individual temperament. To decrease your dog's excitement level when you come home, it might help to distract him by asking him to perform some simple behaviors that he is already learned, such as sit, down or shake.

JOBS
Consistency Is The Key!
You are responsible for providing food and shelter. You also have the responsibility of supplying an environment whereby the dog feels safe and secure. Leadership & Resource controlling plays a major part. Lack of consistency and over-bonding can be a cause and effect of separation anxiety. I often say to my clients that three most important tenets in dog behaviour and training are Consistency, Consistency and Consistency. Though it must be said other factors may also play their part.

HOW TO HELP DOGS ANXIETY AT NIGHT
How to Help Dog Anxiety at Night
Even though you might be tempted to give in and let your pooch sleep with you, this is the last thing you should do. In the majority of cases, rewarding attention-seeking behavior is counterproductive. Teaching your pooch commands like "sit" and "stay" is a great way to keep them out of your room. When treated with a tasty snack for keeping their paws off your bed, dogs quickly lose interest in trying to sneak in under your covers. Separation anxiety in dogs at night is not always a light matter. If your pooch has severe anxiety attacks, consider getting a crate or a dog bed you could place in your bedroom. Before you go, say "Quiet" in a calm, firm voice. Wait until they stop barking, even if it's just to take a breath, then praise them and give them a treat. Never reward them while they are barking, even if you think it will get them to stop. Try to take the opposite approach. Teach your dog to "speak." Once they are doing that reliably, then signal for them to stop barking with a different command, such as "quiet" or by holding your finger up to your lips. Be sure to practice these commands when they are calm.

DAP Collar or diffuser - dog appeasing pheromones have a calming effect on some dogs. Both the collar and diffuser last about 30 days.

Also, you can try White noise machine or soothing instrumental music. White noise will help to block out sounds from the outside world that may agitate your dog. Try playing white noise, which you can get for free on the web or as an app, alongside another device that plays soothing instrumental music. Through a Dog's Ear produces music exactly for this purpose. Once you have a good routine of care established for your dog, making they are not alone, you are ready to start the training process. Other measures to help reduce their stress and anxiety can help set your dog up for success during that process, as well.








FIGHT DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY - BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
FIGHT DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY:
BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION

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Behavior modification exercises must be done consistently (for weeks to months to see results, and the exercises may need to be continued for life.

Teach independence
Avoid rewarding attention-seeking behavior. Reward the dog with petting, treats, or other attention only when she is calm and quiet.

Reward!
Always reward good your dog for relaxing behavior Reward relaxation: With your dog in a "sit" or "down" position in a quiet resting area in the home, reward your dog when he is calm. You may want to provide a mat or bed that you have your dog go to when he is calm. Provide toys at this "settle mat" and teach your dog "down stays" while on the mat. A calm dog will not be panting, wagging his tail, or otherwise moving. Use a word like "easy" or "steady" to serve as a cue for the relaxed behavior. When your dog learns to be relaxed with you close by - this may take days to weeks, slowly increase the distance between you and your dog. Provide a treat when the dog is calm. If your dog shows evident signs of being relaxed - puts his head down or sighs, provide an extra special reward. Don't reward clingy behavior, but don't ignore your dog, either.

Desensitize to Departure Cues
Almost everyone has a set routine when they leave the house - shaving or putting on makeup, putting on shoes, picking up the keys, putting on a coat, etc. These activities inadvertently signal to your dog that you are going to leave, and many dogs start to get anxious as soon as they see these departure cues. To desensitize your dog to these cues, do these activities several times during the day but don't leave. Also try leaving by a different door and block the sounds of the departure.

Downplay Departures
It is best to remain neutral around your dog for 15-30 minutes before you depart and as you depart. As your ready to leave, simply move your dog to the room or crate where he will be while you're gone, provide the food-filled toys, and quietly leave without saying anything.

Provide Safety!
Unless confinement increases anxiety, house your dog in a comfortable, safe, room or spacious crate. Baby gates often work better than closed doors when trying to confine a dog with separation anxiety If your dog cannot be left safely alone, consider dog day care. If your dog can be left for short intervals, consider having a dog walker one or more times a day.

Enrich the Surroundings
Turn on the radio and lights 30 minutes before you leave. Studies have shown that classical music can have a calming effect on anxious dogs. White noise, like a fan running, may also be helpful.

Toys for Furballs!
Provide treat-filled toy or safe chew toy as you leave. Fill a Kong or other toy with canned food and freeze it. This will last a long time. It's OK for your dog to get most of his calories through these food treats. If you can, use treats that are well-balanced nutritionally. Regularly change the type of toy to provide variety. Also provide the toy at times when your dog is calm and you are not leaving, so the toy itself does not become a departure cue.

Destroy 'em all!
Dogs with separation anxiety often have destructive tendencies, so provide something your dog can destroy such as old phone books, newspapers, stuffed toys from thrift shops - remove any choking hazards such as button eyes.

Sofas
Provide a comfortable bed.

Have an Ice Day!
Dogs with separation anxiety often tend to get thirsty because they pant and/or drool more. Try freezing water in a plastic pail. Secure it to the side of the crate so as it thaws it will not spill.

Tone Down The Return!
Be low key when you return. Refrain from greeting your dog until he has calmed down.

Punishment helps Anxiety !!!
Do not punish or scold your dog. This escalates the problem and may make the dog fearful of the owner and cause the dog to become more anxious at the owner's expected arrival time. Keep in mind that your dog does not have this problem behavior because he is mad at you or trying to 'get back' at you. Punishment, especially after the fact, will only be confusing and cause more anxiety. Always start with a visit to your veterinarian to rule out health problems. Separation anxiety can be a very frustrating and traumatic situation for both you and your dog, but with patience and proper treatment it can usually be dramatically improved.








DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY NATURAL TREATMENTS & SUPPLIES - HOMEOPATHIC & HERBAL REMEDIES
DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY
NATURAL TREATMENTS & SUPPLIES

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These are the most common natural remedies used today for separation anxiety and have been used successfully for many years. Today there are many toxic drugs on the market that claim to help your dog but most have side effects which can cause further problems to your dog's health. William Osler quoted great words of wisdom, referring to orthodox medicine: The person who takes medicine must recover twice, once from the disease and once from the medicine.

Helping Your Dog Naturally:
Play some music. Choose classical music, calming or easy listening, since the idea is to help calm your dog. News radio can sometimes work, but not if there are talk shows with debates or loud, anxious, excited hosts and guests.

Record normal household sounds and play the recording for comfort. Put on a continuous-play recording of your voice calmly reading a magazine. Occasionally play the tape when you are home so dog does not associate the recording only with your departure.

Try leaving a worn item of our clothing you wear as your smell can bring comfort to your dog.

Being aware of your dog's diet can help: a lot of problems can occur when fed poor quality food and a change to an all natural diet without any artificial ingredients can be hugely beneficial.

Walk, play with and exercise your dog before leaving.

Feed your dog twice per day to avoid any mood swings that can result from low blood sugar. Try feeding the biggest meal of the day before you go out as your dog will feel more content and sleepy after a good walk and a satisfying meal.

Natural Treatments
If you are wary of giving drugs to your dog, or they have a health condition that prevents them from taking it, holistic dog anxiety treatments might be the right choice for them. For homeopathic remedies, look for a dog anxiety medicine based on soothing and safe herbs, such as chamomile, pasque flower or passion flower, to name a few. These natural remedies can come in the form of calming treats for dogs, pills, chewables, sprays or drops. Some popular choices include Ultra Soothe, K9 Calmer, and Bach Rescue Remedy. Other natural dog anxiety treatments include:

Thundershirt, a pet vest that offers your dog a sense of safety by tightly wrapping around their body

Dog-calming music can soothe your dog and prevent anxiety attacks, check out dog separation anxiety music mix for nervous furballs!

Products containing dog appeasing pheromone or DAP, often in the form of diffusers and sprays.

Homeopathic and Herbal Remedies

Pulsatilla nigicans (Pasque-flower)
This is one of the most common homeopathic medicines given for separation anxiety and should be given in the 6c or 30c. Can be given orally direct into your dog's mouth or added to the dog's water throughout the day. The leading signs with the Pulsatilla dog are clingy, fears being alone, fear of abandonment and becomes very fearful and emotional when left alone. They desire companionship and become very agitated and anxious causing them severe distress.

Calcarea phosphorica (Calcium Phosphate)
This is another beneficial remedy used in separation anxiety and best used used in the 6c or 30c potency. Dogs needing this remedy can be destructive, chewing furniture and other things in the house. They require endless love and companionship and get very upset on their own. Calc phos types are also terrified of thunder and will shake and tremble while in company during a storm or similar event, but without company they are likely to bolt during a storm and disappear for several days.

Gelsemium (Yellow Jasmine)
Animals requiring Gelsemium are often referred to as the trembler. With Yellow Jasmine there is quivering, which can range from a muscle group to the entire body, both inside and out. It is the remedy for anticipatory anxiety and is often used for separation anxiety. The dog can be so worked up it can have diarrhea or involuntary urination when under extreme stress of being alone. It can be given in the 6c or 30c potency either orally into the mouth or in your dog's water.

Passiflora (Passion flower)
Calming anti-convulsant. Quiets the entire nervous system. Swift acting and non-addictive. Can be given in tincture form added to daily water.

Scutellaria (Skullcap) and Valerian
These are wonderful herbal medicines for the symptomatic relief of anxiety and nervousness. They are invaluable to calm and relax dogs suffering from symptoms associated with separation anxiety.

Avena Sativa (Oatstraw)
An anxiolytic producing a sense of calm, similar to Valerian, Passiflora and Scutellaria. Can be added to your dog's water. Comes in tincture and homeopathic pellets.

Chamomila (German chamomile)
While Roman chamomile and German chamomile have slightly different medicinal qualities, in general they both treat anxiety in the same manner. Chamomile is a potent sedative used to reduce anxiety in stressed animals. It has the added advantages of calming your dog's belly and helping him sleep. Some pets enjoy chamomile tea as much as we humans do. Or you can soak a small treat in the tea and give it to them. It is available in capsule/tablet and tincture forms as well.

Kava Kava
A traditional herb used in Polynesian ceremonies, kava kava reduces anxiety, relaxes tension, including muscle tension, and calms restlessness without loss of mental sharpness. Kava kava is a good herb of choice for a tense, nervous or anxious dog. It is available in capsule, tincture, ground and powdered forms. The ground and powdered forms can be made into a tea and added to the daily water or sprinkled onto food.








SUPPLIES TO HELP YOUR DOG FIGHT SEPARATION ANXIETY
GENUINE SUPPLIES TO HELP
YOUR DOG FIGHT
SEPARATION ANXIETY

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Curing separation anxiety quickly is unlikely, so get patient. You might need to experiment with different supplies from the list:

SUPPLIES TO HELP YOUR DOG FIGHT SEPARATION ANXIETY

Swaddling Jacket
Swaddling jackets work like swaddling clothes for babies. These calming garments use gentle pressure to relieve pet anxiety. The ThunderShirt is an example of an effective dog swaddle. Studies show that pressure wraps can promote relaxation and reduced anxiety in animals, particularly dogs.

Toys
Nothing beats a good old toy for an anxious mutt. They are effective, cheap, and available in stores. Some of the common toys for dogs with separation anxiety are chew bones, treats, bully sticks, and puzzles. KONG dog toys are probably the best dog separation anxiety toys. Stuff it with your dog's favorite treat, and this will keep your pooch busy for quite some time. Remember that dogs love toys that squeak. Offer toys when you leave the house and hide them as soon as you return home. It's a healthy distraction while you are away that will help you avoid dog anxiety medicines in the future.

Pet Radio
This is one of the simple but often overlooked dog separation anxiety solutions. Turn up the music when you leave the house to keep your dog engaged. Dogs enjoy "species-specific: music that produce unique pitches, tones, and tempos. Pet radios like Pet Acoustics are pre-loaded with music specifically made for canines. These songs have been digitally modified to emit different frequencies with varying decibels, which is why they are calming for dogs.

Calming Supplements
Made from herbs, these supplements are natural dog anxiety solutions and a satisfying non-sedative snack. They are available as chewable tablets, water additives, or bone-shaped treats and help calm pups without the nasty side effects. We have heard numerous success stories about the use of natural home remedies for dog anxiety such as chamomile, lemon balm, valerian, skullcap, and echinacea. However, dogs can respond differently, so consult your veterinarian when in doubt.

Aromatherapy
Another effective resource for dog anxiety treatment is aromatherapy. Essential oils include lavender, cedarwood, bergamot, vetiver, chamomile, ylang ylang flower, clary sage, and sweet orange. Some fragrances are said to produce neonatal pheromones, reminding dogs of their mothers and reducing anxiety. Just spray a diluted mixture of water and oil on your dog's fur - don't apply the straight oil directly to their skin.

Pet Camera
Pet cameras like the Petcube Play cure dog separation anxiety by letting you see, talk to, and play with your pup. Download the Petcube app on your phone to interact with your furry buddy. Dog cameras are the latest breakthrough in pet care. These pet monitors feature 1080p HD video, 2-way audio, night vision, 3x digital zoom, and a built-in laser toy. There is also Petcube Bites which is a Wi-Fi pet cam with a built-in treat dispenser. You can use it to fling calming treats to your dog or just to remotely treat and reward your pooch for good behavior.








DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY CURE TIPS & TECHNIQUES
DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY
CURE TIPS & TECHNIQUES

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The goal of treating separation anxiety is to reduce a dog's dependence on its owners. Ensure that your dog feels safe and comfortable when you are away from him. Provide plenty of fresh water and clean, warm bedding for your dog.

Change Your Behavior !
Most of us have a routine we follow before we leave the house: shower, dress, put on a coat, grab keys, walk out the door. Once he has recognized your routine, your dog's anxiety may start building from the first step. This means his anxiety is not just beginning when you walk out the door. Instead, it starts when your alarm clock goes off or you turn on the shower, and by the time you leave the house he is in a full blown panic. To prevent this building anxiety, make some changes to your own behavior. Pay attention to the things you do before you leave the house, and begin doing them randomly throughout the day. For example, you can grab your keys and sit down to watch television, or put on your coat and feed your dog. Within a few weeks, your dog should no longer see these things as signs that you are about to walk out the door, and some of his anxiety should be eased.

Look At It From Your Dog's Perspective

To your dog you are the most important thing in his world. Dogs are pack animals who are very sociable creatures and thrive on company for many reasons. Your dog would spend every bit of his life with you if he could. So it's only natural that when you go out, your dog experiences varying degrees of distress or anxiety. He becomes confused, doesn't know where you are going, why he can't be with you and if you will be coming back to him. When the two of you are separated all he wants is to be reunited with his pack, which is you.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY HELP FIGHT TIPS & TECHNIQUES
THE FIGHTING TECHNIQUES...
1. Start When They are Young
Separation anxiety may be prevented while they are still a learning young puppy. If you have just adopted a puppy then you can encourage them to explore and entertain themselves with toys and treats for short periods of time. Try leaving the room for short intervals of 1 or 2 minutes leading to slightly longer intervals. Leave small treats to reinforce that your absence creates positive emotions. Eventually, the shock of being left alone as they age won't be as emotional.

2. Run Before You Leave For Work
If you are not a morning person I can hear you moaning already, believe me I am not a morning person either. But after my dog ripped down every curtain and drape in my home and chewed up each corner of my kitchen table, I knew I had to do everything I could to calm him before I left. Dogs build up nervous energy that needs an outlet, if they don't find one they result to destructive behavior. Wake up 30 minutes before you leave for work, put your shoes on and run - not just a walk! your dog. If you are not into morning jogs then teach your dog to play fetch and let them sprint back and forth for 20 minutes, getting all that pent up energy out. By the time you leave for work your dog will be ready to go back to sleep. After doing this for a few months you will actually begin to love your new morning routine, I promise. The morning fresh air is better than coffee. For extreme cases you may have to do this every time you leave - not just for work, but your dog will become accustomed to the routine of playing, and then napping when you leave.

3. Have a Consistent Routine
Dogs with a routine behave better. They have an amazing sense of time, and once they settle into a routine of play and exercise, they generally just nap during the rest of the day. Simply by walking, feeding, playing, and sleeping at generally the same time each day, your dog will get into a rhythm and feel more relaxed.

4. Find a Dog Walker or Sitter
An afternoon visit may be just the thing your dog needs, and another part of their daily routine they can look forward to. Again, dogs love routine, so having a dog walker arrive roughly around the same time can keep them at ease. Alternatively you can leave your dog with a trusted sitter. When looking for a dog walking service do a little research, and make sure they are well trained for the job and insured.

5. Take Your Dog to Daycare
Some dogs take well to daycare, others not so much. You will have to analyze your dog's behavior in populated environments and dog parks. Then you will need to research the best day care in your area. Also, stay in contact with your daycare to get updates on how well your dog is responding. Daycares can be great for your dog's social development, not to mention a great way for them to run and play. I understand that Daycare every day of the week may be out of your price range, however some day cares will give you deals for booking an entire month in advance, or reduced day-rates. But if that's not an option try just picking at least one day a week and see if there's any improvement.

6. Use Puzzles and Interactive Toys to Keep Them Busy
One of the favorite methods is to fill up a toy with your dog's favorite treats. My personal favorite is securely pushing in Lamb lung into a Kong. There are several other "puzzle" toys available to keep your dog occupied. You can also create a scavenger hunt around your home, hiding treats for them to discover. Or you can simply leave a bone, raw hide, or other chewable treat. For obvious reasons, don't use treats that can stain furniture or leave a mess. And of course do not save money on your furball, with buying ON SALE AMAZON-EBAY-WHATEVER chinese happy 1-day dog toy. Some toys and chews present a choking hazard, and bones can damage teeth. Don't leave your dog alone with these items until you have monitored their chewing behavior. You won't be home in case of emergencies, so be aware of any possible dangers.

7. Mental Stimulation is Just as Important as Physical
Walking your dog every day is great, but it may become mundane. Dog's love routine, but they crave new challenges, new experiences, and to visit new places. If your dog is suddenly acting out, and walks just are not doing it anymore, maybe it's because you have walked the same path for several weeks and haven't challenged them to something new. Switch it up and explore new places, Training is a great way to stimulate that brain, and you may find your dog is exhausted just from learning new tricks, Puzzles and toys are another way to challenge your dogs mind, or simply hiding treats to create a scavenger hunt around your home!

8. Don't Make a Big Deal of Leaving and Coming Home
You know the routine, you walk through the front door after a hard day of work and are greeted with excitement and kisses. Who doesn't love that? ;-) Unfortunately, you may be feeding into their sense of anxiety. Show them that leaving and coming home isn't a big deal and doesn't need to be celebrated. From now on when you get home completely ignore them until they are totally calm. Over time they will understand that they will get rewarded with attention for being calm, and ignored while overly excited. The same goes for leaving your home: ignore your dog 30 minutes prior to departing. Make a rule with everyone in the house that there's no touching or eye contact before leaving or coming home. What about guests who don't know those rules? Put a sign on your front door that reads something like this:

GUESTS: We have dogs in training, and have a NO TOUCH rule. Please, do not pet dogs until they are calm.

9. Reward Them for Being Calm, Ignore Them When Overly Excited
As a follow up to the previous rule, you can apply this technique through the day as well. This is a simple training technique, but one that requires discipline from the owner more than the dog. Simply put, if your dog is bouncing off the walls, ignore them. When they are calm and acting in a way you prefer, then reward them with gentle pets, treats, and attention. If they suddenly begin to get too excited from your attention then go back to ignoring them. Even negative attention is still attention, so when your dog is overly excited and misbehaving - yelling and getting frustrated is still giving them what they want. This is where your patience will truly be tested but overtime you will be rewarded with a calm dog.

10. Desensitize Your Dog to Your "Leaving Routine" - Your dog is very receptive to triggers – try this: grab your car keys and put on your shoes. Does your dog immediately jump to attention and begin to monitor your every action. They recognize your routine for leaving, just little sound and movements, like the sound of your keys can trigger them into a learned response of excitement or anxiety. Because you go through the exact same routine every morning your dog has picked up on your cue's they know you are about to leave. If you desensitize them to those daily triggers it will certainly reduce the separation anxiety felt when you leave.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY CURE TIPS & TECHNIQUES

Try this: Grab your keys, put on your shoes, and go through the entire routine you would when you are leaving the house. Now leave the house, and close the door behind you, and wait 5 seconds. Now go back in. By this point I'm sure you have your dogs full attention. Take off your shoes, put your keys down, and sit down, all while completely ignoring your dog and showing no emotion. Wait for the dog to completely calm down, and go through the entire process again. And again. And again. You may have to do this dozens of times, leaving slightly longer each time. But each time you do it you are causing your dog to relearn their emotional triggers. Eventually, and it may take some time, your dog won't even respond to your leaving. Keep testing how long you can leave before they appear anxious when you return, then dial it back a bit and keep trying to expand on your away time. This can be a big training commitment, so even using this technique a few times each day for several weeks can help curb this negative behavior. Unlearning a bad habit takes time, I recommend doing this over a weekend or when you have a few days at home.

11. Crate Training and Creating a Comfortable 'Safe-Space'
Even if you are training an older dog, all dogs in the wild will naturally seek out a small and dark shelter, so crate training can create a very comfortable and safe environment for them. But it must be introduced the proper way or it will cause even more distress - we want a safe-space, not a prison. Crate training is not something you can implement over-night. It will take weeks of training before you can comfortably leave your dog alone in a crate without causing anxiety. Crate size is very important, it should have enough space for your dog to comfortably turn around, stand up, and lie down in any position. Start by keeping the crate in the room you spend the most time, leaving the door open. Use comfortable bedding or blankets, and always present treats, toys, and food in the crate. The idea is to get them to go in by themselves and enjoy their time there. Never force your dog into the crate, you must introduce it as a comfortable place, and continue to do so. Forcing them in will cause even more anxiety and distrust. That means when you leave for work you can't just shove them in. After your dog has begin to spend their own time in the crate, have them spend short periods of time in it with the door closed, while slowly increasing your time away.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY CURE TIPS & TECHNIQUES

Don't always leave the house while they are in their crate, or they will automatically associate the crate with you leaving. If your dog can comfortably spend 30 minutes in the crate with the door closed, you can now experiment by leaving the house for short periods of time. Again, do not make a big deal of leaving or coming home, just go through the routine without showing emotion. You may need to follow Rule #10 to desensitize them to your "leaving routine", or they will become anxious every time it comes time to enter their crate. Keep in mind some dogs respond very well to crates, and some typically free-roaming large breeds, do not respond well at all. Through personal experience I've found Huskies, Malamutes, and some Shepherds have free roaming instincts that do not respond well to kennels and can lead to more problems. In this case it may be more ideal to use a spare bedroom or section of your home to create a safe space.

12. Give your dog a bedroom!
This worked amazingly well for many dogs! Instead of giving dog free reign of my entire home, or reducing his space to a kennel, I just used a spare bedroom that had nothing but his bed and his favorite toys. I introduced it as a safe space, left items of old clothing that smelled like me, and my dog would often sleep in there during the day even when I was home. If you have the space available this may work for you.

Depression Structure:
Grounding Dogs with separation anxiety need your help, and the first thing to do is to start having your dog do things respond to commands for everything he gets: food, attention, treats, play and walks all happen after he listens and responds to a command such as sit. This will calm him and help reassure him that you are leading the team. For complete guidelines click here.

Space
Separation anxiety dogs are often "owner addicts." They want to be leaning, touching, sitting on, gazing up at or sitting their owners every moment. This needs to change. Get a dog bed. It doesn't have to be fancy - a folded blanket will do and give him all his petting and attention there. Treats are given there. Meals are given there. Make this the best seat in the house. Do not call him off of the bed to come to you, and leave him be when he is on it. This may be hard for you at first but things have to change, right?

Teach & Train

Get the interaction you crave through training. Take a class, pick up a dog sport and find new ways to spend time with your dog, ways that don't involve you attending to his needy side. If you want him more confident, you need to build his confidence through daily, fun training sessions. Developing shared communication between the two of you is a gift only you can give your dog.

Teach your dogs as many commands as possible. Your pet should be able to "sit", "relax" & "stay" on command while you stroke and reassure him. One of the best ways to accomplish this is to join a group obedience class. Each member of your household should participate in a take charge way because it is impossible to have happy, well-adjusted family pet if family members are below it in the peck order. The point of this training is teaching anxious dogs to relax and give it confidence. Do the exercises in various rooms of the house and in the yard. Give out praise effusively and chew treats liberally.

Confinement
Many dogs can learn to be contentedly crated, as long as you take the time to make the crate a pleasant spot. Crating an anxious dog can prevent mishaps and calm him. If he is clean in his crate, the crate can be as large as you want.

Slow Start
Start slowly. Introduce crating with treats, feed him in the crate and then crate for short periods when you are home. If you only crate when you leave, that can create crate stress.

Exercise
Physical Long walks, solo fetch games up slight hills and swimming are all good ways to give yoru dog a work out. Playing wrestle-mania with a friend's dog works some dogs up, leaving them more excited and active. How do you know when you have found the right routine? When your dog is calmer after the session than before.

Mental Side
Mental exercise is just as important than physical, if not more. Games that build his self-control, focus and patience are key to him getting better when alone. Our new book, "My Smart Puppy," out next month, details many games you can play to build success and use that busy brain to its fullest.

Calm your Friend
Our advice? Leave and greet your dog the way you leave and greet your parents or spous - calm and matter of fact is perfect. Avoid long, drawn out, emotional partings because those only make matters worse for your dog. A good rule? Act the way you want your dog to act, he will follow your lead.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY CURE TIPS & TECHNIQUES

At the other end of the spectrum, skip yelling. As frustrating as this problem is, if you yell at your dog when you come home you will increase his stress about your coming home, making the anxiety more intense. Prevention is key, not punishment. Lastly, keep your routine the same seven days a week. If you give your dog 100% attention on Sunday, expect an increase in separation issues on Monday. Do him a favor and make his life predictable. Apart from using tried and true strategies for breaking a dog's separation anxiety, there are a number of useful tips and tricks that can help your dog. These small changes and practices can make a world of difference!

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY SYMPTOMS & SIGNS - BY WWW.PETCUBE.COM !

What Not to Do !!!
There are certain methods that definitely won't work: just ask the numerous pet experts and fellow pet parents. These practices are not only ineffective, they might make things worse - both for you and your pet.

Punishment
Most dog trainers agree: it isn't effective for treating separation anxiety and can even make the situation worse!

Another dog
Getting your dog a companion isn't a cure-all and might double your problems. Consult with a behaviorist or trainer before taking on responsibility for another dog.

Yell or make a fuss
Negative attention is still attention- and the last thing you need to do is to make your dog believe that being destructive is what it takes to be in the spotlight.

Obedience training
While formal training is typically always a good idea, your dog's separation anxiety might not be the result of disobedience or a lack of training.

The Calming Yo-Yo Exercise
The Calming Yo-Yo exercise is designed to teach a dog how to remain calm during short, controlled absences from its owner. This exercise is useful for dogs who suffer from very mild to severe cases of separation anxiety, or for dogs who just don't like their owners to leave the room. A professional diagnosis of canine separation anxiety is not necessary to begin this exercise, but if your dog has a strong reaction to this exercise, it would be wise to consult a competent veterinary behaviorist soon. The principles of the Calming Yo-Yo exercise are the same as for most realistic, sensible treatment protocols, which makes it easier to understand how those protocols work. The insights gained from this simple exercise make it less likely that serious errors will be made if or when more complex behavior modification procedures are attempted. What the exercise does is demonstrate to the dog that being calm is the quickest, most reliable way to bring an owner back. Being anxious, whining, barking, stamping paws, panting excessively, or straining at the restraint won't achieve the dog's goal.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY CURE TIPS & TECHNIQUES
Treating Minor Cases of Separation Anxiety
Rule out other causes. Notice when symptoms take place. If they occur when you are coming or going, separation anxiety could be the cause. But if your dog exhibits problem behaviors when you are just sitting put, it's most likely something else.

If your dog uses the bathroom where it's not supposed to while you are home the cause probably isn't separation anxiety.

Consider visiting a vet to rule out incontinence or digestion issues, or visit a trainer for help completing potty training.

Similarly, excessive barking or howling could be signs of incomplete training, especially if you didn't have a hand in training your dog when it was a puppy.

Most dogs go through a period of excessive chewing as juveniles. Do your best to make it understand which toys are for chewing and which items belong to you.

Make sure you don't leave shoes, clothes, or other tempting objects out during your dog's juvenile period, from a few months before its first birthday to a few months after.

Make leaving and arriving home routine and unexciting. Don’t make a fuss when leaving and don’t greet your dog immediately when you come back home. Give it a few minutes, then calmly pet it. High-arousal departures and arrivals can lead to an inability to deal with being alone.

Don't make your exit with lots of fanfare or with a big gestures.

Try to avoid giving recognizable cues, like grabbing your keys loudly, that signal you are leaving.

Take your dog on a long walk before you leave the house. Making sure your dog gets plenty of exercise helps to reduce anxiety, especially for larger breeds. Taking a long, brisk walk will tire it out and make it more likely to settle down. Engage in other playtime activities, such as fetching and other games that offer both physical and mental exercise. Make sure your dog gets at least 30 minutes of walking exercise every day. Go different places when you take it on walks so it's exposed to new sights and smells.

Leave an item carrying your scent with your dog. Your scent will help comfort your dog and will help keep it calm until you return. Dogs' primary sense is smell, and reassuring smells can offer safety cues. Leave an unwashed but unsoiled blanket, towel, or article of clothing with your dog before you go. If your dog is crate trained, leave the scent item in its crate with the dog.

How to Teach Dog to Stay Alone
If your dog goes into mourning every time you leave the room, it is important to teach her that your absence is not the end of the world. Start a training routine to help her get used to temporary separation. As with any training, it's important to work gradually and consistently. Start by asking your dog to "stay" in one room - preferably her "dog zone" while you are home with her. Gradually lengthen the distance and time of your separation until you can leave her alone for 20+ minutes without incident.

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Dogs know when you are thinking of leaving long before you do. Perhaps it is because you put on your shoes, pick up your purse or car keys or put on your dress clothes. If you can determine what the clues are that you give your dog, you can try to desensitize him to these clues by repeating them frequently but not leaving and by giving him a treat and praise when he behaves well. When you have made progress, make your departures quiet and quick. Try leaving through a back or side door. Departures should be quick and quiet. The Family should ignore the dog 20 minutes before you leave and 20 minutes after you get home.

DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY CURE TIPS & TECHNIQUES

If none of the dog separation anxiety tips work the first time, it doesn't mean they won't work the second time around. Experiment and try out different techniques until one of them proves to be a match. Anxious behavior is just behavior. It looks and sounds terrible, but it can't go on forever. Separation anxiety can be treated with the right method, and finding one is just a matter of trial and error. However, if your dog's separation anxiety disorder is extreme, seek professional help sooner rather than later!








JOBS
GET YOUR DOG BUSY!
JOBS TO PROVIDE YOUR DOG
TO FIGHT SEPARATION ANXIETY

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Providing lots of physical and mental stimulation is a vital part of treating many behavior problems, especially those involving anxiety. Exercising your dog's mind and body can greatly enrich his life, decrease stress and provide appropriate outlets for normal dog behaviors. Additionally, a physically and mentally tired dog doesn't have much excess energy to expend when he is left alone. To keep your dog busy and happy, try the following suggestions:

Give your dog at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity - for example, running and swimming every day. Try to exercise your dog right before you have to leave him by himself. This might help him relax and rest while you are gone.

Play fun, interactive games with your dog, such as fetch and tug-of-war.

Take your dog on daily walks and outings. Take different routes and visit new places as often as possible so that he can experience novel smells and sights.

If your dog likes other dogs, let him play off-leash with his canine buddies.

Frequently provide food puzzle toys. You can feed your dog his meals in these toys or stuff them with a little peanut butter, cheese or yogurt. Also give your dog a variety of attractive edible and inedible chew things. Puzzle toys and chew items encourage chewing and licking, which have been shown to have a calming effect on dogs. Be sure to provide them whenever you leave your dog alone.

Make your dog "hunt" his meals by hiding small piles of his kibble around your house or yard when you leave. Most dogs love this game!

Enroll in a reward-based training class to increase your dog's mental activity and enhance the bond between you and your dog. Contact a Certified Professional Dog Trainer for group or private classes that can give you and your dog lots of great skills to learn and games to play together. After you and your dog have learned a few new skills, you can mentally tire your dog out by practicing them right before you leave your dog home alone. Please see our article, Finding Professional Behavior Help, to locate a CPDT in your area.

Get involved in dog sports, such as agility, freestyle dancing with your dog or flyball.








So, Do Dogs Smile?
DOG ANXIETY AND FEAR
SUBORDINATION & HAPPINESS

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When treating a dog with separation anxiety, the goal is to resolve the dog's underlying anxiety by teaching him to enjoy, or at least tolerate, being left alone. This is accomplished by setting things up so that the dog experiences the situation that provokes his anxiety, namely being alone, without experiencing fear or anxiety. Dogs do show happiness outwardly, but not necessarily using their mouths. When a dog feels genuinely at ease, he may actually position his mouth in a way that truly resembles a smile. But he might make such a face when he's not really at ease, too.

Smiling Dog
Body language can be an effective gauge of how at ease a dog feels. Happy dogs have a general looseness to their bodies, and that applies to the mouth area, too. If the sides of your pooch's mouth point slightly higher than the rest of it, that often, but not always, signifies that all is wonderful in your dog's world for the moment. More telling is your dog's tongue. A loose hanging tongue combined with a mouth slightly ajar generally points to a good moods in a doggy, according to the Caring Hands Humane Society website. Although dogs don't actually smile like humans, they sometimes happen to make expressions that look like smiles.


Anxiety and Smiling
A smiley expression in a dog doesn't necessarily indicate happiness. If your dog's mouth is open just a tad, with the sides raised, he may indeed look like he's smiling, but he may actually be anxious, nervous or otherwise in distress. Signs of distress accompanying a stiff smile include heavy panting with the tongue in, whining and chattering teeth. Consult your vet.


Subordination and Smiling
A dog may also give the false impression of smiling in subordinate situations, according to the ASPCA. If a dog is threatened by another animal or human that he feels is higher in ranking, he may attempt to show his subordination by raising his lips in a nonaggressive display. It's a different baring of the teeth than an aggressive one, and the dogs know the difference. It has the appearance of a smile, but the poor pooch is scared. Look out for other "hints" of subordination, including crying, pushed back ears and a hanging head. Make sure the upper portion of the doggie's snout isn't crinkled. That sometimes is a belligerent body language signal to back off.








DOG FEAR CATEGORIES
DOG FEAR CATEGORIES

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A tail held in a low position indicates nervousness or fear. A dog with a low or tucked tail is showing that he is unsure or afraid of what's going on - and it also indicates that the dog could become defensive and lash out in an effort to protect itself. A fearful dog will sometimes wag only the tip of his tail in short, rapid bursts. If the tail is raised while shuddering, it is likely that the dog is becoming an active threat.

Dog and Puppy tail wag

Dogs wagging their tails to the left were found to be expressing negative emotions such as fear, anxiety and aggression, while dogs with tails wagging to the right were showing positive feelings like happiness, excitement and satisfaction. Rightward wagging communicates happiness. When good moods prevail, the left side of the brain takes over and controls the right side of the body, including the dominant tail movement direction. A leftward leaning indicates that fear and anxiety are the probable emotions ruling the situation.

Fear of Thunderstorm

Dog Bad habits

I have listed this problem here, not because it is a behavioral problem in the classical sense, but it is a real problem to the dog and something that the owner can do something about. Called a Thunderstorm Phobia or simply Storm Phobia, this condition occurs when a dog is overly frightened of one or more aspects of the storm causing him to display physical, psychological, and behavioral signs.

Fear of Children
Fear of Nail Trimming
Fear of Noises
Fear of Objects
Fear of Other Animals
Fear of People
Fear of Riding in Cars
Fear of Specific Places
Fear of the Veterinary Clinic
Neophobia (Fear of New Things)
Separation Anxiety

Bringing fearful dogs to the dog park to socialize them
Again, like dog-aggressive dogs, fearful dogs need calm, quiet, controlled environments with low stimulation levels to learn how to get over their fears. Fearful dogs could be afraid of too much noise, other dogs, sudden movements, other humans, trash cans or any number of things. If you have a dog that tends to be easily scared or nervous, a dog park is a nightmare. Think of it like this: if you were really afraid of spiders, what if someone dumped a bucket of spiders on your head and said, "See! It doesn't hurt!" It may not hurt, but it would completely freak you out! Same thing with bringing a dog that is scared or insecure to a place with too many new stimuli. It could lead them to become even more afraid, or worse, start lashing out to protect themselves from what scares them so much. To socialize a fearful dog, work with a trainer or take small-group classes. But avoid the dog park until your dog has gotten over her fears.








DOG SEPARATION ANXIETY & CRATES
SEPARATION ANXIETY & CRATES

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A crate can also be an effective preventive tool. Dogs who have been properly introduced to their crate tend to feel safe and secure in this private den. In some cases, dogs prefer the sanctuary of a crate to being left alone in a big open house. Since every dog is different, it's important to pay attention to exactly which options are comforting to your dog - and which are not before leaving him home alone.

Step One:
Predeparture Cues

To Crate or Not to Crate?
Crate training can be helpful for some dogs if they learn that the crate is their safe place to go when left alone. However, for other dogs, the crate can cause added stress and anxiety. In order to determine whether or not you should try using a crate, monitor your dog's behavior during crate training and when he is left in the crate while you are home. If he shows signs of distress - heavy panting, excessive salivation, frantic escape attempts, persistent howling or barking, crate confinement is not the best option for him. Instead of using a crate, you can try confining your dog to one room behind a baby gate. Unfortunately, sometimes separation anxiety just isn't preventable, especially with an older dog. Experience or genetics may have already triggered the onset. But, thanks to desensitization, crating techniques, and an understanding of the disorder, it's treatable. In fact, a diagnosis of separation anxiety in no way precludes a healthy and happy existence for your dog. With some extra effort, your relationship can be extremely satisfying for you both.








DOG TOYS
PETCUBE INTERACTIVE
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Petcube Lets You Play With Your Dog From Anywhere

DOG TOYS

If you have a pet and work full-time, you likely have some pet parent guilt about leaving them home alone all day. How do you prevent them from just sleeping all day, or worse tearing up your stuff? That's exactly what Petcube aims to change. It's a sleek gadget that connects with your smartphone, allowing you to both see and play with your pet no matter where you are.

DOG TOYS

the Petcube box contains a wide angle camera, microphone, and speaker, so from the app you can both see and talk to your pet. You'll just have to train them to come to the cube when you call. You can take photos and video directly from the app, which means you can capture all those silly moments even if you aren't home. But this isn't just a gadget for keeping an eye on your pet, you can also use the setup to play with them when you're not home.

DOG TOYS

The Petcube has a built-in laser pointer that you can control with the app. It's a game for both you and your pet! And if anyone in the office asks what you're doing on your phone during the day, just let them know you're exercising your dog or cat. No one can argue with that!

DOG TOYS

If you don't have a pet, never fear! You'll actually be able to play with your friends pets by connecting to their Petcube. The founders eventually hope to install Petcubes in animal shelters to connect pet lovers with dogs and cats that are available for adoption. We're fully in support of using technology to connect future pet owners with their furry friends!

DOG TOYS

To get a full look at Petcube, take a look at their video:

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WATCH DOG & PUPPY VIDEO !!!


DOG TOYS

DOG TOYS

DOG TOYS









SEPARATION ANXIETY IN DOGS MISCONCEPTIONS
MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT SEPARATION ANXIETY
IN DOGS

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MYTH: If a dog is afraid particularly of men, it must have been abused / beaten.
Not necessarily! Since behaviour is determined as a result of a combination of a dog's genes, experiences and learning, and the current environment, this is not always the case. Dogs with shy, reserved temperaments, dogs that have had a lack of social interaction, particularly in their early development periods, and dogs suffering from boredom and stress are amongst those that can display similar behaviours to dogs that have been abused.

MYTH: That guilty look isn't an expression of guilt - it's fear
All the logic lines up: Your dog was left alone and did something they weren't supposed to do, that they knew better than to do, and when they are called on it their face says it all. Perhaps you are already saying "No! Bad dog! Bad dog!" or some variation thereof. Disambiguating the "guilty look": salient prompts to a familiar dog behavior," focuses on how people interpret dog emotions through the scope of human emotion. More simply: People tend to misattribute dog emotions to human emotions. The "guilty" look is a prime example of this. We are kind of wired to see it this way, so it's nobody's fault. It seems unlikely that they have the same types of thinking about thinking that we do, because of their really different brains, but in most ways, dogs brains are more similar to ours than dissimilar. That first bit is especially important: thinking about thinking, known as executive function, because it means dogs aren't likely to reflect on their actions and decide they have done something wrong. When you adopted your dog, and suddenly you are living with a dog, within a week we have opinions about the dog's personality, what they are like and what they are thinking. It's a way to try to predict what's gonna happen next with an organism that we don't really know. So we use the language of human explanation, and we just put it on the dog.

MYTH: Getting a new dog can help treat separation anxiety
A lot of pet owners think that their dogs feel anxious because they have no one with them at home. So, as a solution, they get another dog. In certain cases, this can actually solve the problem, especially if a dog feels lonely. Any warm body, be it another dog or a human, can help soothe the dog's anxiety. However, there is always the chance that it won't work. Instead of solving the issue, you can end up with two dogs with separation anxiety. If you are considering getting the help of another dog, don't adopt right away. Ask one of your friends first if he can let his dog stay at your place for awhile. If your dog responds positively, then you can bring another dog at home.

MYTH: Destructive dogs are anxious dogs
When a dog is suffering from separation anxiety, he will look for objects and places that can give him comfort. Most of the time, this includes the scent of the owner. By instinct, he will go through his owner's belongings as well as the door where his owner has left him. However, you need to bear in mind that not all dogs that show destructive behaviors are anxious dogs. In some cases, it can be linked to being untrained, under-stimulated and boredom.

MYTH: Dogs with separation anxiety won't eat
Humans undergoing a lot of stress tend to lose appetite. However, for dogs, chewing can actually make them feel better. It helps them relieve tension and stress. They will gnaw on chew bones, treats and even their food dispenser. Keeping any of these things close by can help prevent destruction at home.

MYTH: Anxious dogs should never be put in a crate
You can consider this one a partial myth. While it is true that there are dogs who will try real hard to escape to the point of mutilating themselves, there are also dogs who find comfort in their crates. This goes particularly true with dogs who are used to sleeping in their crates at night and those who wouldn't mind spending a few hours inside it during the day.

MYTH: Allowing your dog to sleep with you can lead to separation anxiety
Letting your dog sleep with you will not directly trigger separation anxiety. However, allowing your dog to be close to you the entire time can build an intense familiarity and strong bond that can make it hard for him to be separated with you. Instead of sharing the same bed, consider putting a separate sleeping space for your dog. This doesn't mean that you need to keep him in a separate room or too far away from where you sleep. You can set up a bed for him next to yours. If he insists on getting up your bed, be consistent in putting him back to his own space. In case putting your dog in a separate room is inevitable, it's a good idea to set up a few cameras there.

MYTH: You should ignore your dog the minute you arrive
A huge number of pet owners believe that for someone to avoid triggering separation anxiety in dogs, he needs to ignore his pet 10 minutes before he leaves and 10 minutes after he arrives. Although logical, this approach actually triggers more anxiety in dogs, especially if they don't know exactly why they are being ignored. Instead of totally ignoring your pet, try to greet your dog in a controlled manner. Avoid making a big fuss when you come home.

MYTH: Dogs that are hyper-attached to their owners are more at risk of separation anxiety
There are dogs that just can leave their owners' side. They will follow their owners to their room, kitchen and even the bathroom. Because of how attached they are, it's easy to think that they are the ones who are likely to feel anxious when left behind. As a rule of thumb, keep in mind that not all dogs who are strongly attached to their owners suffer from separation anxiety. Dogs that don't constantly follow their owners aren't completely free from anxiety, too.

MYTH: Using special types of collars can alleviate anxiety in dogs
Using a collar infused with citronella can stop anxious dogs from barking. This, however, doesn't mean that they won't feel anxious anymore.

MYTH: Exercising dogs can help prevent separation anxiety
There's no doubt about how important regular exercise is for dogs. It can make them stronger, flexible and more focused. Unfortunately, its list of benefits doesn't include treating separation anxiety. If you want to really solve the issue, you have to know how to properly condition and desensitize your dog.

MYTH: You should let your dog stick close to you at home
People get dogs for companionship and there's nothing wrong with that. However, if you have a dog struggling with separation anxiety, you need to learn to put just the right amount of space between the two of you. This can set proper boundaries as well as let him find other things he can put his attention to.








COMFORTING A FEARFUL DOG MISCONCEPTIONS
COMFORTING A FEARFUL DOG
MISCONCEPTIONS

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What is Stress?
The question of stress is one that I have given some careful consideration to. Stress has many definitions, but here are a few pertinent ones: A physical, chemical, or emotional factor that causes bodily or mental tension and may be a factor in disease causation. The non-specific response of the body to any demand for change.Managing fear isn't simple. If you have a fearful dog and need help I suggest seeking out positive reinforcement trainers in your area. When it comes to helping a fearful dog it's important to keep your own behaviors in mind. While you won't reinforce fear by remaining calm & providing comfort you can make things worse by freaking out yourself. If you yourself panic when you meet a new dog your dog will start to pick up on that. If you are scooping your dog up every time they meet a new dog they may start to assume that hey there is something to be scared of, and they may begin to act more defensively when a new dog approaches. For long term solutions you are going to need to address the fear itself and come up with a way to help your dog through it. Dogs who are fearful, and therefore reactive or possibly aggressive.

Is Stress OK At All?
Clearly stress is a serious deal, but maybe not all bad. Prescott Breeden published a very nice post on Stress and Learning recently. His article deserves a careful read, in case you haven't read it already. Are you back now? Great! I won't synopsize the whole article, but the two relevant points are: a little stress can be beneficial to learning and the optimal amount of stress for learning varies inversely with the difficulty of the task. Some express their fear through barking and lunging, or even growling and snapping or worse. Others appear more typical for what people would expect out of a fearful dog: cowering, turning their head or body away, or trying to hide, for example.

DOG

The fear isn't going to get better by just ignoring it, and it can often get much worse. If you find yourself in a situation where both you & your dog are fearful the best solution may be to just walk away. If you can't control what's happening and you are unable to turn the situation into a positive experience sometimes leaving is the best solution. It's certainly not easy to do, and it can feel like a failure. But knowing when to say this isn't working can help get you out of a situation before it incites even more fear. As with managing fear in any aspect of life it's a judgment call, and there isn't always going to be a simple solution. A common way to help fearful dogs is by using counter conditioning. It's the process of changing a negative emotional response into a positive one, and it works well for many fears. It's not a quick process, but to truly help with fear you should be trying to think of ways to help your dog start to see those scary things as not so scary after all.

MYTH: We Each Define How we Provide Comfort Differently
So you asked a simple question on a dog forum: should I be comforting my fearful dog during a thunderstorm? You get a ton of answers from both sides, and you are probably feeling more confused and discouraged than you were to begin with. I mean it's a simple question after all, yet everyone answers it differently. The first problem with the question of comforting a fearful dog is the fact that we are not all on the same page when it comes to how we define comfort to begin with. The best way to address whether or not you should comfort your dog during X event is to think about what would help them out in the long run. Is this a one time situation that probably won't come up again? If that's the case sometimes the best way to provide comfort is to remove yourself from the situation.

DOG MISCONCEPTIONS

If it's a scary situation that will come up again you should be thinking of ways to help make your dog comfortable with it in the long run. If it's thunderstorms perhaps giving your a treat when you hear the boom of thunder will help them start to associate it as not being such a bad thing. Managing fear isn't simple, and a stranger on the internet isn't likely to provide you with the best answer when it comes to your dog. It's about knowing your dog and what they find comforting, and knowing how to keep them from going over threshold and panicking. Comfort a dog whose nervous around strangers is a lot different than the way I'd comfort a dog panicking during fireworks. Levels of fear vary, and so do the levels of comfort we provide.

MYTH: Comforting Your Dog Will Not Reinforce Fear
The most common misconception when it comes to comforting a fearful dog is that it will just reinforce the fear. I certainly understand where this concern comes from, but it's important to note the distinction between fear & behavior. Fear is the unpleasant emotion caused by the belief that something is dangerous. Behavior is the way in which one acts in response to a situation. When we talk about fear we are only talking about the unpleasant feeling that we are in danger, not the behaviors associated with it. We often get stuck in the mindset of thinking that providing comfort to a fearful dog is just reinforcing the fear, and that it's just going to make the fear worse.

DOG MISCONCEPTIONS

Think of it this way: if your dog is terrified of thunderstorms & you pet them during one it's not going to make their fear of storms worse. Petting during a storm is probably not going to be enough to help them be less fearful next time, but it can provide comfort in the meantime. As long as the comfort you are providing is actually comforting to your dog you are not going to be reinforcing their fear. Keep in mind that fear exists on a scale ranging from mild to severe. For dogs that are extremely fearful of a situation providing a little bit of comfort isn't likely to solve the underlying issue, but it's certainly not going to make it worse. In certain situations where our dogs get extremely fearful comforting them is the most humane thing to do, and if that's not possible by simply petting them sometimes removing yourself from the situation is the best choice. It's similar to the way we help our friends deal with scary stuff. If your friend is terrified of elevators you can try to help keep them calm by distracting them during the ride. Your comfort & support isn't making their fear of elevators worse, but it may help make it easier for them to deal with. Providing comfort to a fearful dog won't enforce their fear. When we choose not to provide our dogs with help & support in scary situations that fear can get much worse.

MYTH: Comforting Your Dog May Reinforce Behaviors
Another misconception I see regarding the idea of reinforcing fear by providing comfort is confusing fear with behaviors. We spoke about fear above - the emotional response of feeling like were in danger and how providing comfort won't make the fear itself worse. Now let's move onto behaviors. Fearful dogs can exhibit a variety of different behaviors when they are scared. They might exhibit the classical signs of fear such as pacing, shaking, whining and hiding. But scared dogs can also exhibit defensive behaviors such as growling or snapping. The best example of a fearful dog exhibiting defensive behaviors is resource guarding. It's when a dog gets defensive when you approach their stuff, most often their food. Laika had severe resource guarding years ago, and I'll be the first to admit I didn't see it as a fear based behavior at all to begin with. I thought she was just being a selfish jerk. After much research & with the help of a trainer we started to address Laika's resource guarding through counter conditioning & lots of patience. Dogs that guard their food aren't being territorial or dominant. They see you as a threat to their stuff and they are acting defensively out of fear. It's important to understand that behaviors such as resource guarding when your dog might be growling at your are actually fear based. In order to see long term results you need to address that fear and help them start to see you coming towards their food as no big deal.

DOG MISCONCEPTIONS

Another example of how we can reinforce fearful behaviors is how we respond when our dog meets strangers. Let's say your dog is scared of having new visitors over, so when your friend comes over your dog starts to act defensively by growling. If you start comforting your dog & petting her telling her it's all OK during this meeting they may think "OK then I'll just keep growling." Your dog will still be scared of strangers because you haven't helped address their fear, and since you comforted them while growling they may start to think of that behavior as acceptable. In other words nothing will change, and your dog will still be scared & probably growl the next time it happens. To help address my dogs fearfulness of strangers I like to make Laika's associations with new people positive. I will give them treats to give her, or tell them to kneel down & let her come to them. Since she's only slightly nervous around new people it's pretty easy and after 30 seconds they are usually her new best friend. With dogs with more severe fears you are going to have to work on it. You are going to need to find a method that helps your dog address their fear in a way they can manage, and one that will help them start to see that scary thing as no big deal.

MYTH: If a dog is afraid - particularly of men, it must have been abused / beaten
Not necessarily! Since behaviour is determined as a result of a combination of a dog's genes, experiences and learning, and the current environment, this is not always the case. Dogs with shy, reserved temperaments, dogs that have had a lack of social interaction - particularly in their early development periods, and dogs suffering from boredom and stress are amongst those that can display similar behaviours to dogs that have been abused.

MYTH: You Should Wake Them Up If they appear to be having a nightmare
Whether the dog's dream is an ongoing question, but till now there is no definite answer, the evidence points strongly in the direction that they behave. Dogs show REM moves the eye rapidly sleep, which is the kind of sleep that we have when dreaming. Dreaming is also linked with the process of getting the memories back, which is something the dogs have proven the ability to do. So let's know about the nightmares of dogs? For starters, we can't say that the dogs are able to have nightmares, given that we don't know about the dog's dream at all. The owners who recognize their dogs twitching and whining in their sleep, there Is a lot of stress in leaving your dog alone when they feel uncomfortable. Many owners take it upon themselves to avoid the dog free of its supposed sleepy horrors. However, this could be more harmful and stressful to your dog's health. Like humans, dogs also need a certain amount of deep sleep to maintain good mental health and normal development. Canines tend to nap between 14-16 hours every day. But in this deep sleep is very little. When your dog appears to be dreaming, it is having vital deep sleep that it requires. Disturbing their sleep could be unhealthy for them.

MYTH: Dogs that cower or duck when you reach toward them have been abused
You might think so, but in most cases this is a myth about dogs that has no basis in fact. One thing you have to remember is that, like their cousins the wolves, dogs are social creatures and in many cases they are submissive to what they consider authority. Ever heard of that pretty doubtful "alpha dog" concept? Dogs tend to accept their place in the pack, and in most cases, they perceive humans as the leaders of the local pack. This isn't always the case, and size doesn't necessarily matter - anyone who's ever owned a Pomeranian can tell you they will usually try to be the alpha, no matter how small they are.








PUPPY BODY LANGUAGE & SIGNS - FEAR, AGRESSION, ANXIETY
DOG FEAR, AGRESSION & ANXIETY
BODY LANGUAGE SIGNS

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So... what are the Dog Body Language signs for us to interpret as before-a-bite? Dogs can become aggressive for any number of reasons - fear, dominance, guarding possessions. No matter the reason for the dog aggression, the body language of a dog can let you know if he is about to bite. Knowing what to look for can help you prevent dog bites.

1. Growling and Snapping
Growling and snapping are probably the most obvious signs that a dog is about to bite. Dogs growl or snap to let you know they are unhappy or uncomfortable. If a dog growls or snaps at you when you approach him, it's time to give him some space. Growling and snapping can be helpful, too. Pay attention to the times your dog growls or snaps. Does it happen when you approach him when he's eating, when strangers approach, or when you touch him while he's asleep? Knowing what elicits the growling and snapping allows you to manage the problem and work on changing the behavior.



2. Wagging Tail
This is one of the signs that many people find surprising. Dog trainers often hear dog owners comment that their dog was wagging his tail right up until the moment he bit someone. But pay attention to the way your dog wags his tail. A happy dog may wag his tail and get his whole body involved. A dog who is about to bite is usually fairly rigid, and his tail will be pointed high and moving more quickly back and forth. This may be a sign of an impending dog bite.

3. Raised Fur
When dogs are afraid or overly stimulated, you may see the hair on their backs stand up. In some dogs, just the hair on the back of the neck between the shoulders stands up. Other dogs have it at the neck and also near their tails. Still other dogs may have a ridge of hair that stands up down the entire length of their backs. If you notice a dog has his hackles raised, it's a signal that he needs you to back off.

4. Rigid Body Posture
Often when a dog is about to become aggressive, his body language is a dead giveaway - no pun intended. A comfortable, happy dog usually has a relaxed body with his ears low and a happy, wagging tail. An aggressive dog is just the opposite. His entire body may go stiff, and his ears and tail are raised high. If you reach out to pet a dog, and his entire body freezes rather than wiggling to get closer, he is not happy with being touched. It's time to move away to make him more comfortable.

5. Lip Licking, Yawning and Averting Gaze
If you notice a dog is licking his lips - when food is not involved, yawning repeatedly, or turning his head to avoid meeting your gaze, he is trying to tell you something. Dogs engage in these behaviors to let you know they are uncomfortable with something going on around them. For instance, a dog who has never been around children may lick his lips or yawn when a child comes over to pet him. It does not necessarily mean that he is about to bite, but it is a warning that he is not comfortable. A dog who is uncomfortable, afraid, or stressed is more likely to bite. Your best bet when a dog uses one of these appeasement gestures is to try to alleviate his discomfort.

6. Cowering and Tail Tucking
Cowering and tail tucking are more overt signs than lip licking or yawning that you are dealing with a fearful dog. While fearful dogs don't always bite, fear does increase the likelihood. If you encounter a dog who cowers away from you with his tail tucked between his legs, back off. Let him approach you in his own time, and he will be less likely to feel the need to bite to defend himself.

7. Seeing the Whites of the Eyes
Many dog trainers refer to this as whale eye. You will see the whites of a dog's eye when he moves his head slightly but doesn't move his eyes. A half moon of white will show around the dog's eyes. Whale eye is a sign of anxiety in dogs. It's an expression many animal shelter workers are familiar with. Again, this doesn't necessarily mean that a dog is about to bite. It means that a dog is feeling anxious, and anxious dogs are more likely to bite. If you see a dog showing the whites of his eyes, it's a good idea to give him some space until he feels more relaxed.

Dog Gestures, Languages, Communicate with a Dog

This dog is frightened but is not submissive and may attack if pressed. A dog will generally give these signals when he is directly facing the individual who is threatening him.


Stressed and Distressed

Dog Gestures, Languages, Communicate with a Dog

This dog is under either social or environmental stress. These signals, however, are a general "broadcast" of his state of mind and are not being specifically addressed to any other individual.


Fearful and Worried

Dog Gestures, Languages, Communicate with a Dog

This dog is somewhat fearful and is offering signs of submission. These signals are designed to pacify the individual who is of higher social status or whom the dog sees as potentially threatening, in order to avoid any further challenges and prevent conflict.


Extreme Fear Total Submission

Dog Gestures, Languages, Communicate with a Dog

This dog is indicating total surrender and submission. He is trying to say that he accepts his lower status by groveling before a higher ranking or threatening individual in the hopes of avoiding a physical confrontation.

Dog Gestures, Languages, Communicate with a Dog

Fearful Body Language: The tail is low and possibly tucked. The tail could be straight down in a fast, stressed wag. The ears are generally back and hackles may rise in excited fear. The head is usually held low and there may be some crouching. In more severe fear cases, fearful dogs may role onto their backs and/or urinate from fear. This is the ultimate "no fight" communication from a dog. As fear escalates, dogs can move into either flight or fight response. In flight, the dog will be trying to exit in all directions in a panicked manner. If the dog cannot flight, fight may erupt with aggressive displays of teeth or vocals.

DOG COMMUNICATION BODY LANGUAGE

If this happens with a fearful dog, as a general rule putting more distance between the dog and the scary object will calm the dog down. Never back a fearful dog against the wall or into a corner where he cannot escape.

Aggressive Body Language: The head will be very high, with ears forward/erect. The corners of the mouth will also be forward. If barking, you can almost see the 'O' formed with the mouth. Aggressive dogs will often lean their entire body weight forward, even standing on their front tip toes to make themselves appear larger. The tail will be erect. Hackles may appear.

MYTH: Deaf dogs are more likely to experience separation anxiety
No significant differences in frequency of separation anxiety was noted between deaf and hearing dogs. The reasons for separation anxiety in deaf and hearing dogs is different. Primary cause of anxiety for deaf dogs is waking up or looking up from a really interesting dust bunny he is playing with and realizing that his person has disappeared, whether that's into a different room or from the house altogether. Deaf dog will go hunt for his person and, once found, will frequently return to what he was doing and relax. A hearing dog with separation anxiety, she suggests, is more related to being left alone. For deaf dogs, it's more of a case of "Where are you?" causing stress rather than, "Why am I alone?" To prevent "separation" anxiety in deaf dogs: when you leave the room or the house, notify your deaf dog that you are leaving. When this simple and additional communication occurs, she finds that deaf dogs do not exhibit behavior similar to separation anxiety. Of course, every dog is different, but this is a good rule of thumb.









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